Sighted persons ask: What is braille? Author Mugambi Paul

Fortunately, being blind myself and with my lived social interactions with different individuals and levels.
Many have asked me severally how does a blind person communicate, access or deliver information.
When I tell them that I am grateful for our hero and father Mr. Louis they are surprised.
They don’t know if it wasn’t for him, I would be hidden somewhere in a cage or even a beggar in one of the markets in my country of origin.
As a global citizen I pay tribute to Mr. Louis who ensured that those who have seeing difficulties can be able to participate in the competitive world in all spheres of life.
Braille is a system used by people who are visually impaired to write and read. The Braille system was invented by Louis Braille, who was blind at early ages but good at learning. In 1825, inspired by a military code used by soldiers to communicate at night without lights, he invented the nonlinear writing system. In Braille’s system, each letter consists of six dot positions arranged in two columns with three dots each. Different letters are represented by the numbers and positions of raised dots. It should be noted that the first ten letters of the alphabet in Braille system also represent 10 digits, namely, 1 to nine and 0. So how do you differentiate a digit or a letter in text? Well, there is a special symbol called “Number Follows”, which always precedes a symbol that indicating a digit. These is also another symbol called “Capital Letter” that functions similarly, indicating the following letter is in capital. Lets meeti in the disability Sausage YouTube channel for much more.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.
Australian Chief Minister Award winner
“excellence of making inclusion happen”

Why the down under Aare already in the new year 2021? Author MUGAMBI Paul

Why the down under Aare already in the new year 2021?
Author MUGAMBI Paul
Hi consumers of my platform and those who enjoy he disability sausage:
,
I want to wish you a happy New Year!
May 2021 be filled with lots of love, health, happiness, and achieved goals.
I truly wish that for you, readers and listeners.
But remember…
This won’t just randomly happen.
You need to plan for it, put in the effort, and keep working on yourself.
No one is going to hand success to you in 2021. It’s all you.
You have to be proactive about it.
One thing I always do at the end of the year to ensure I’m proactive about my goals, growth, and performance, is to take some time for planning & reflection.
First, I look back on the year to see what lessons I’ve learned, what I’ve done right, and where I can improve for the next year.
Here are a few questions I’ve asked myself in the past few days:
• What did I learn this year? How did this year make me stronger and better?
• What 3-5 tasks and projects gave me the best business/financial results?
• What were my main sources of negativity and unhappiness?
• What were my main sources of positivity and happiness?
These questions help me shine a light on what I should do more and less of in the next year.
This helps to avoid the same energy-drainers year after year, while it also helps to stay focused on the things that significantly add to my health, happiness, and business success.
Then, I take the time to think about the next year. I mean, how can you expect to have your most successful year if you don’t plan for it?
Therefore, I ask myself the following questions:
• What will my main intention be for this year?
• If I could only achieve one goal this year, what would it be?
• Which tasks, projects, and activities should I focus more on for optimal health, wealth, and business success?
• How can I make sure all of the above will actually be done and doesn’t just stay a wish? (for example, already plan certain tasks & activities in your schedule, reach out to an accountability partner, already commit to things by paying for it, signing up, making appointments, etc.)
These are the questions I’ve been asking myself these past days, and I highly encourage you to do something similar!
Remember, 2021 won’t magically become your most successful year.
You have to plan for it, put in the effort, and keep working on yourself.
You got this.
To Your Most Successful Year,

I believe in diversity and inclusion.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.
Australian Chief Minister Award winner
“excellence of making inclusion happen”

Why Kenya doesn’t deserve another Mathare Mental hospital! Author: Paul Mugambi

In 2017, the CRPD Committee adopted general comment No. 5 on Article 19 on living independently and being included in the community, which clearly stated the obligation of States Parties to adopt a plan for deinstitutionalization, including the closure of current institutions and not to build new ones. Yet, without quality community services and support for parents, institutions are seen to provide better care than children with disabilities would receive at home.
By drawing on the experiences of parents, advocates, NGOs, and public officials, this is due to the November pronouncement by Kenya that it has budgeted for a new modern mental health institution instead of strengthening families. In the latest Kenyan escapades, the duty bearers are ensuring that persons with psycosocial disabilities do not access community empowerment activities by pushing the agenda of institutionalization!
Is this what organizations of persons with disabilities in Kenya want?
Are these the thoughts of care giver of persons with intellectual and psycosocial disabilities?
Has the current Mathare hospital served its purpose and now we want a modern and larger institution?
It’s not just enough to take back the gains of the individuals, advocates and care givers of persons with disabilities.!
Let’s meet on disability sausage YouTube channel as we up pack why community related solutions are more beneficial than the idea of institutionalization of persons with psychosocial disabilities.
They are individuals with rights and deserve the best.
Defending the rights of the already marginalized groups with a sector is not an easy ride.
We need to have a debate!

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.
Australian Chief Minister Award winner
“excellence of making inclusion happen”