The triple tragedy after poverty and disability welcome Covid! Author Mugambi Paul

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The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.

 Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Australian Chief Minister Award winner

“excellence of making inclusion happen”

 

 

 

In low- and middle-income countries, 1 in every 5 people has a disability. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, households with disabilities spent a third more on healthcare than other households. During the COVID-19 crisis and subsequent strain on existing systems, people with disabilities living in poverty are among the most vulnerable to widened health and economic inequalities that risk deepening already disproportionate poverty.

In other words, While COVIDー19 has impacted us all, it has not impacted us equally. 71 million people, 1 in 5 of whom have disabilities, are set to be pushed back into extreme poverty.

People with disabilities are at immediate increased risk of acquiring infection due to barriers to accessing health information, difficulty maintaining social distance for those who require support for everyday activities or who live in institutions, and the high cost of hygiene products for those experiencing extreme poverty.

 

More broadly, people with disabilities experience disproportionate barriers to secure livelihoods and are more vulnerable to economic shocks. Users of assistive devices or medical services are at risk of having their needs deprioritised due to health system strain. And women with disabilities around the world are beginning to report heightened vulnerability to violence and difficulty meeting basic needs. As a public policy diversity and inclusion expert I believe We have a real opportunity to engage people with disabilities and place them at the center of our response and rebuilding efforts. Through listening to people with disabilities, and considering their specific needs and identified priorities, we can ensure the potential impacts of a global pandemic are reduced and lives are saved. “I look forward to the day when policy commitments will be reflected in the budget making processes and implementation.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.
Australian Chief Minister Award winner
“excellence of making inclusion happen”

In low- and middle-income countries, 1 in every 5 people has a disability. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, households with disabilities spent a third more on healthcare than other households. During the COVID-19 crisis and subsequent strain on existing systems, people with disabilities living in poverty are among the most vulnerable to widened health and economic inequalities that risk deepening already disproportionate poverty.
In other words, While COVIDー19 has impacted us all, it has not impacted us equally. 71 million people, 1 in 5 of whom have disabilities, are set to be pushed back into extreme poverty.
People with disabilities are at immediate increased risk of acquiring infection due to barriers to accessing health information, difficulty maintaining social distance for those who require support for everyday activities or who live in institutions, and the high cost of hygiene products for those experiencing extreme poverty.

More broadly, people with disabilities experience disproportionate barriers to secure livelihoods and are more vulnerable to economic shocks. Users of assistive devices or medical services are at risk of having their needs deprioritised due to health system strain. And women with disabilities around the world are beginning to report heightened vulnerability to violence and difficulty meeting basic needs. As a public policy diversity and inclusion expert I believe We have a real opportunity to engage people with disabilities and place them at the center of our response and rebuilding efforts. Through listening to people with disabilities, and considering their specific needs and identified priorities, we can ensure the potential impacts of a global pandemic are reduced and lives are saved. “I look forward to the day when policy commitments will be reflected in the budget making processes and implementation.