The missing 11 opportunities in 2020 for disabled Kenyans Author Mugambi Paul

Background:

Tribalism and Gender come up frequently in both social media and mainstream media discussions in Kenya.

But what about disability?
It’s a known fact that The largest minority group in Kenya constitute about 7 million.
but despite that huge number, many disabled people face challenges reaching their full potential in social, economic, cultural and political spheres.
How do we break the chains?
as a public policy scholar and being blind I would like to author the missed opportunity of the Kenyan disability movement.
This is to say I highly understand the barriers that disabled Kenyans face in sea, land and air.
This is coupled with inadequate policy and legislation execution.
I opine that three quarters of the disabled Kenyans are poor, and this is catastrophic
This problem cannot be address with the normalcy which is currently perpetuated by the current disability movement
We have to adapt new way of thinking and be ready to make the systems work for persons with disabilities.
Miss opportunities:

1. The treasury normally conducts public budget engagement every year both at national and county levels: the disability movement could have presented their own version of budget which could have been adopted by the budget committee.
2. BBI committee: the disability movement could have advocated for representation in the BBI task force team.
3. Housing agenda: the Kenyan disability movement could have demanded 15 % of the new housing schemes should be fully accessible.
4. Opportunity at the national employment authority: the Kenyan disability movement could have demanded a robust plan and execution of disability employment services targeting disabled persons.
5. Accessible toilets: the Kenyan disability movement could have emphasized at list enforcement of usage of accessible toilets in most government and private entities instead of the toilets being used us storage facilities.
6. Accessible bank notes: the Kenyan disability could have demanded the central bank to issue accessible bank notes instead of allowing the president to cheat the Blind persons like me as evidenced in June 1st, 2018.
7.
Organizational culture: the Kenyan disability movement should mirror itself and see if it’s being an enabler of inclusion or it’s a talk show entity.
This is to say Beyond just bringing diverse disabled people together, persistent initiatives, specific behaviours, and intentional practices that support inclusion are needed for tapping and invigorating the potential of diversity and for leading to disability inclusive organisational cultures.
Thus, having proper leadership commitment, accountability, and contextualization.
8. utilization of online and live streaming services during workshops and conferences: at this era of digitalization and the faster collection of both true and fake news the Kenyan disability movement could have had robust plans of ensuring combining the old way of board room meetings with technology in order to collect diverse views and opinions.
9. Identity registration: the Kenyan disability movement could collaborate with the interior ministry of the super CS Mating’I and ensure the disabled get the disabled card much faster just like the planned Identity card and passport issuance.
10. Bodaboda transport: 80 percent of disabled Kenyans are mostly likely to use bodaboda for accessing public places but the Knyan disability movement went mum as the interior ministry developed regulations. Obviously the bodaboda reforms will have adverse effects on the wanjikus with disabilities.
11. Secondary school transition: the Kenyan disability movement could have joined the ministry of education and campaigned for grater transition of learners with disabilities. Moreover, the disability movement could have pushed for the ministry to fund all student with disabilities joining form one.
Could the 4.811 students be learners with disabilities?
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Inside the Kenyan disability corridors of power Author Mugambi Paul

Over the past few years, the discourse agenda of many disabled Kenyans has been dominated by service delivery and public participation debate] Mugambi 2017] this is because both incredibly important issues. But amid these dominating subjects, have the voices of disabled Kenyans been hard?
Has Kenya improved its level of inclusiveness?
Globally, persons with disabilities are estimated to represent 15 per cent of the world’s population, but in many developing nations this percentage
can be significantly higher] world report 2011 UN enable 2011].
this is to say, population of 1.3 billion, disabled persons constitute an emerging market the size of China. Their Friends and Family add another 2.4 billion potential consumers who act on their emotional connection to PWD] Ilo 2017].
Together, PWD control over $8 trillion in annual disposable income] ILO 2016].
The aging Boomer population is adding to the number of the disabled daily. As Boomers’ physical realities change, their need and desire to remain active in society dovetails with the demands of PWD. This group controls a larger share of the national wealth than any previous generation. Does Kenya government know this?
Just like many developing nations Kenya is on automobile settings on matters disability inclusion.
Most public policies are well woven but poorly executed. This is quite evidenced by the rare and sometimes absence seen in leadership and decision-making roles, the visibility in
popular culture and media are low, absence of disabled representation in key policy decision organs and stakeholders, and recognition of the work as thought leaders and influencers is almost non-existent. What has been happening?
The Kenyan government has strongly concentrated on developing policies geared towards social safety nets. In other words, the Kenya government sees disabled persons as people who need care and do not deserve to contribute to the economy.
Debatably, if the Kenyan government could turn the coin, they would gain more tax collection from this single largest minority in Kenya.
This can be achieved once the government realizes and focusses on effective, first service and maximization of social assets] Whiteford 2018].
How will Kenya government meet the sustainable development goals 2030?
How will the vision 2030 be achieved?
How will the big 4 agenda be achieved?
The reality is disabled Kenyans have been left behind.
This has led to artist and disability activist to start to compose or entertain with the song “do not live us behind”
As evidenced in twitter tags and music.
Moreover, The work of the disability rights
movement often consists of them highlighting their absence from the public domain.
In other words, most regulations and legislation on disability are still shelved in the cabinet. this has led to continuous charity model of delivery of service with out clear roadmap towards right based approach. This is affirmed by the implementation of education policy practises etc
Needless to say, its popular for public and private organisations to claim that they are being inclusive, yet retention rates remain low for disabled people in most organisations, with very
few moving into positions of leadership or responsibility.

I observe, A key factor in understanding inclusion is that it lies in the eye of the beholder. Many organisations have good intentions on inclusion, yet their staff
members from minority groups don’t feel comfortable and leave within a short period. For other organisations inclusion is a reality, so long as everyone
fits in and conforms to company culture] eddy robber 1988].

It’s very easy to say you are being inclusive, it’s another matter to be viewed as being so by those who are the target for being included. I don’t want to sound like a broken glass “why should someone claim his or her organization, yet a disabled person can’t access a toilet?”
According to my findings Most people mean
well, but they forget their unconscious behaviours. Very few people are comfortable with stepping back to allow a person from a minority group (like a
disabled person) to take an opportunity over themselves. Even fewer seem comfortable with a disabled person being their supervisor.
Could this be one of the reasons of the low rate employment recorded by Kenyan public service report
in 2015?
There are those who consider inclusion to be not “seeing” a person’s difference. This isn’t inclusion, its assimilation.
There isn’t much point in having disabled employees to your team if they aren’t valued for their contribution. This seems like an unnecessary thing
to say, yet social media has heard many stories about disabled staff who are never sent the documents in a format they can read
and work on, or aren’t given time to hear what is happening via their interpreter, and even highly experienced employees who are never given the opportunity
to speak and share their views. They are, quite literally, token appointments.
As a public policy scholar and with lived experience on disability, I affirm that the focus must shift from charity model and have accommodation to a plan focused on specific actions to attract customers and talent in disabled persons markets.
Even the available market opportunities for the disabled are being snatched under our noses.
Why aren’t we represented in many government bodies?
Who is supposed to audit the leadership gaps in the disability sector?

All in all, many disabled people work in invisible ways, shifting ground from within existing business and government structures. This work is just as important, just
as necessary, as the work of those who use the public domain to challenge assumptions and perspectives on disabled people. Internal institutional barriers
need to be addressed as much as social assumptions and social policy. Without taking our place as 15% of Kenyan employment and leadership we won’t be in a position to
challenge the ableist structural barriers which deny an equitable disabled presence across the public and private domains.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.