Should the disabled Kenyans stop be being in Automobile state? Author Mugambi Paul

Majority of Kenyans still see disabled persons as objects of pity. I believe with a collective paradigm shift of mindset we can do it [UNDP 2018]. With the new decade we can stand up and say no to discrimination and harassment of disabled persons. [UN enable 2019]
needless to say, as a totally blind person myself, I am all too familiar with such dehumanizing treatment. Often disabled individuals are treated differently, simply because we look, act, move or communicate differently. But should our differences, stemming from disabilities that we did not choose, be an excuse or justification for others to treat us as lesser individuals?
Unfortunately, many of us, the disabled Africans keep silent as this evil is perpetuated.
This is done by either family members, friends, employers and even in the public spaces.
In liberal democracies, citizens have the right to equal treatment under the law, which means that governments should not differentiate among people without good reason to do so. This is known as the principle of non-discrimination.
That’s because true equality requires a government to actually dismantle structures that perpetuate group disadvantage, either by providing preferential treatment or special protection to those on the wrong side of invisible barriers.
During my tenure as a student leader at Kenyatta university we pushed the policy agenda for affirmative action in university admissions for students with disabilities.
although we din’t get to enjoy the fruits of our advocacy.
Am grateful that the future generation of students with disabilities from 2010 din’t have to pay the price. there were great lessons.
Search as not everyone understand the journey for social justice.
Secondly as a leader you have to sacrifice for the people you lead.
camping at Professor Jude Ong’ong’a and professor Katana DVC academics and registrar academics respectively, was the order of the day.
This was to ensure no disabled person misses the exam card.
With this not withstanding the employers in both public and private sectors in Kenya need to borrow a leaf.
None of these preferential treatment policies are a magic solution for ending group discrimination and segregation, but without affirmative action policy the number of students with disabilities in both public and private universities would be far less than they are today.

On the other hand, In Kenya we have lots of disability awareness campaigns which have highly been of great improvement in the area of advocacy.
In other words, at list the mainstreaming media and social media in Kenya has highly contributed to the improved changes not like when we were starting fighting for disability space.
Additionally, we used to be chased like wild dogs when we approached media gates and other public spaces as we sort for services.
It seemed all along Blind persons were associated with begging thus the maltreatment.
Thanks to the UNCRPD the tide has really changed though we still have a long way to realize the dreams of our forefathers like EDDY Robert of the famous quote “Disability is a club.”
The reality check on Kenya is that we have adopted a more contemporary position on disabilities with accompanying policies and legislation, the general population remains rooted in the medical/charity model of disability.
I can site many examples of how Kenyans see the disabled as objects of pity who require sympathy, help or fixing. These interactions dehumanize and segregate PWDs. When one lives solely in a world of handouts and tokenistic gestures of goodwill promoted by corporate social responsibility initiatives, no dignity is earned, nor will any respect be gained.
For instance,
as a Blind artist and also a professional diversity and inclusion expert many a times people want to pay less for my works in comparison with non-disabled persons [Riayan 2019].
Sometimes with out blinking they demand to be offered service for free.
You really wonder if a blind artist and consultant uses free energy and free provision of his or her needs in his or her life.
Another example is the corporate who allege to organize support for assistive devices or marathons. Do these events actually sustain the disabled persons? Do the activities benefit a few individuals with disabilities and then sing Hosana?
I vividly remember how a vision impaired was almost being lynched at a Muhindi shop in town. This incident happens when he was checking the prices of bags and shoes.
The owner thought the vision impaired individual was a thief.
As long as the disabled are viewed as lesser or alien, dehumanizing incidents like the one we experienced at the media gates, will continue to be a common occurrence. Many incidences of disability-related harassment and discrimination have gone, and will continue to go, unchallenged. Despite protective legislation, sadly, little can be done to address the dignity that has been willfully trampled upon.
As a public policy scholar, this leaves me to conclude that decency and respect for a fellow human being cannot be regulated through legislation alone.
I recognize and appreciate that my views on such matters are not
widely shared by everyone in disability movement nor in our society. I acknowledge
that there are many traditions in our society which reflect different
experiences and perspectives than my own. All the same, I am proud to be
guided by a strong code of conduct that embraces diversity with respect for
divergent differences of opinion, beliefs, identities, and other
characteristics. What I stand for demonstrates that as a blind person am from a diverse cross section of society.
As a global citizen who happens to be blind, I have had the privilege of travelling to many different countries. Of the many that I have visited, Australia and Israel stood out the most. Perhaps due to their experiences and effective implementation of the disability policies.
. In my many visits, I have yet to be discriminated against. I have been treated not only with dignity but have always been offered help respectfully
when needed.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

A letter to Louis Braille from Blind compatriot and Author Mugambi Paul.

Lon post alert.
Happy birthday Louis Braille. You are 210 years.
I celebrate your courage and hope that you bestowed upon the Blind, vision impaired, Deaf Blind and other interested sighted counterparts.
You invented a language which has ensured that we aren’t beggars on the Kenyan streets.
You ensured am not a Cobra a story for another day when underestimation was the order of the day.
#Soyinka Lempaa
Imagine am your cobra would you bring your shoes?
# Tshrooh Benz Mamake Ozil would you cofee me?
Or you shall be the best and enjoy my company like #njeri Kinuthia Hinga?

I pay tribute to you for ensuring we the “Blind” do not become illiterate.
It took 200 years for the United nations to have this commemoration. World Braille Day is observed to raise awareness of the importance of Braille as a means of communication as a full realization of the human rights of the blind and vision impaired persons.
More importantly, Sighted crusaders in this era of digitalization would like to see “Braille” become extinct but as for me and by “Tribe mates” we won’t allow.
We shall continue to demand for alternative mode of communication as enshrined in the article 7 of the Kenyan constitution and article 9 of the UNCRPD.
Even if we receive 2030 vision braille copy in May 2019 while the rest of the country read for themselves in 2008.
We shall not relent.
Article 21 of the UN Convention on the Rights of persons with disabilities obligates member states to ensure that information intended for the general public is in
accessible formats such as braille, and as per article 24 of the CRPD countries are to ensure that in the education system, students who are blind receive
their education in the modes that are most appropriate to their needs, such as braille from educators who are fluent in braille.
Why should the sighted dictate what the Blind and vision impaired language should be?
Imagine if the whole country would be Blind.
All of us would use braille! Big 4 agenda will reach the blind 2025.
Just like you back in our compass days we had to memorize what was being taught or read by Mighty volunteers at Kenyatta university.
Am grateful for those heroes and heroines who were our volunteers.
In other words, am yet to understand how we the “Blind” survived the hardship of the Kenyan education system.”.
Am not being proud here
Many blind and vision impaired persons passed with flying colors and defeated the sighted counterparts who had all access to information.
Imagine if we had equal opportunities what can the Blind and vision impaired persons do?
to say the truth sir Louise Braille many of Blind and vision impaired persons are either teachers or beggars in Africa.
It’s sad to say as the sighted teachers get free teaching aid the blind and vision impaired teachers have to buy braille copies. For those who decided teaching is not their cup of coffee like me this is one of our daily struggles.
No wonder most Blind and vision impaired persons are poor than our counterparts.
This electronic braille device am using today costed arm and a leg while you the sighted counterpart bought a kabloti somewhere in Juja.
Shall we be equal really?
Back to history, the braille system began to spread worldwide in 1868 when a British group, now known as the Royal National Institute for the Blind, promoted braille’s
acceptance. Eventually braille swept the world and brought literacy to the blind in every language.
Although in Kenya not many blind and vision impaired have access to braille or even information.
Marking the centennial of Braille’s death in 1952, the French government proposed relocating your grave from your hometown of Coupvray to The Pantheon in
Paris, where many of France’s most important historical figures are interred. Braille, however, you had requested that you be buried in Coupvray, and the town’s
officials were reluctant to let your body be taken away. So an unusual compromise was struck. Most of your earthly remains were entombed at The Pantheon,
but your hands remain buried at the Church Cemetery in Coupvray.

I promise to visit your historical site so that I will cool my nerves.

Unfortunately, many of Blind and visually impaired persons globally are currently facing
several great problems specially for survival of their existence in
society due to adopting highly negative attitude by concerned
Government authorities in Kenya at national and county levels.
But, in the end, all of us will surely win this battel for survival
for our existence. We shall never forget you. Your legacy on this language lives on.
I hope and trust the newly blinded and vision impaired persons present, and future will join this battle.
What is Braille? Braille is a tactile representation of alphabetical and numerical symbols using six dots to represent
each letter, number and even symbols. Braille is essential in the context of education, freedom of expression and opinion as well as social inclusion as
reflected in article 2 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
My dream as public policy scholar and braille consumer is well articulated by my friend #Christine Simpson, “Braille is now more widely appreciated and understood across the community. We see braille included on street signs in many cities; on lift buttons; on
directional signage at transport hubs and in many larger buildings; on pharmaceutical product labels; and increasingly at tourist attractions, museums
and other places of public interest. The portability of braille available thanks to braille enabled devices has also made braille usage more appealing
to students and those who need to access information while on the move.”
At list for the reader today know that in braille language A is written as dot 1.
B is written as dots 1 and 2.
C is written as dots 1 and 4.
The comment box is open.
Join me in opening and shaking the Blind concoction to celebrate this special day.

Why the disabled Kenyans should stop word romancing in quest for inclusivity. Author Mugambi Paul

Image

Over the past few months, Kenya social media sites within the disability sector has been filled with romantic words of how we us disabled persons should be defined.
Many of the social media users argued for or against the statement “persons living with disability”
Putting my scholarly lenses, I will fall into the trap of using legal instrument.
This is evidently best settled by the clear definition which is quite elaborate in the UNCRPD.
It begs the question whether I live with my impairment or not. Does this really matter?
The pertinent response should be if as and individual or group we are receiving efficient, timely service delivery.
This matter of romantic wording should stop instantly and let focus the energies towards demanding for more improved service delivery in both public and private sectors.
As a matter of fact, the disabled in Kenya are too euphemistic and this clearly waters down the advocacy agenda.
As a public scholar and also a consumer of disability services have put the shoes and thus found to jot my reflections.
This is well informed by the virtue of Some discriminatory experiences
I have encountered within the Kenyan public and private service provision.
I observe there are allot of grey areas we need to focus.
For instance, accessible communication and information, transport provision for disabled persons, inclusive education, demand for employment opportunism etc.
I opine that the Kenyan disability sector has lost its way by being caught
up in politics and the self-interest of higher-ups. As [Peter 2019] affirms the disability sector can redeem itself.
Several reforms need to take place in order to assure and uphold the rightful place and a just society for the disabled in Kenya.
There is a plausible and workable solution
within reach to overcome many of the failures and inefficiencies of disability service provision, and these solutions should be grasped with two hands so that we
can turn this around.
For example, if a follow up response for last year’s open letter on my blog would have changed the narrative.

“Open letter to the Newly NCPWD chair” Mugambi Paul


to put it differently, disabled persons have solutions to the obstacles they face on a daily basis.
“we are the drivers of our destiny”
More importantly, Kenya made several global commitments in 2018.
This has seen several initiatives being pursued by government, international non-governmental organizations, private business sectors and disabled persons organizations.
According to my web-based research most entities in Kenya performed well in meeting their obligations but is this impact felt on the ground?
needless to say, the disabled persons in Kenya have a responsibility of accountability by asking.
Are these global commitments being implemented to achieve the said target population?
Are the global commitments made by Kenya in line with the Complies with its Obligations Under the CRPD?
Are tangible outcomes being experienced by disabled persons at the grassroots?
Success story
Moreover, beyond individual organizations’ progress against their commitments, there is evidence by ministry of labor in Kenya that Global disability commitments has had a wider impact in raising awareness, and increasing
prioritization, in relation to disability inclusion. For sure, disability inclusion as key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.
some of the ministry of labor success story include:
Launch of the National Action Plan on the implementation of the Global Disability Summit Commitments 2018
Development and an advocacy toolkit that will be used to strengthen dignity and respect for all.
Lastly, Establishment and launch of the Inter Agency Coordinating Committee to coordinate and monitor the implementation of the National Action Plan on the
implementation of the Global Disability Summit Commitments 2018. On the other hand, much needs to be done
by the consortiums in the non-governmental organizations.
most of them are still grappling with teething issues and set ups.
We hope in 2020 more research and global commitments outcomes will be felt on the ground.

According to June 2019 Kenya investment report and state social enterprise reports they do not have any reference to inclusivity aspect of disabled persons.
The report just mentions the term disability only in the reference of the social protection aspect of the Uwezo program.
This literally shows Kenya still has a long way towards getting proper participation of persons with disabilities and inclusive reporting.
All in all, the disabled a person and their organizations need to enhance the collaborative accountability mechanisms which will aid towards the realization of achieving the global commitments.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Untold success story of the Cash transfer programme in Kenya Author Mugambi Paul

Rising inequality isn’t a new concern. Many countries in the global are facing this phenomenon.
Oliver Stone’s movie “Wall Street,”
with its portrayal of a rising plutocracy insisting that greed is good, was released in 1987. But politicians, intimidated by cries of “class warfare,”
have shied away from making a major issue out of the ever-growing gap between the rich and the rest.
The best argument for putting inequality on the back burner is the depressed state of the economy. Isn’t it
more important
to restore economic growth than to worry about how the gains from growth are distributed?
I will look at the social protection aspects in Kenya and how it has contributed to changing the lives of most vulnerable persons in the society.
Secondly, I will strive to highlight the misgivings of the global commitments.
To begin, the 2019 to 2020 Kenyan Budget raised the issue of implementing a Single Registry for all social protection programmes. This will improve the coordination of social
protection programmes, which have been highly fragmented leading to numerous inefficiencies. According to the social assistance project the ministry of labour and social services will highly improve the outcomes of the social protection programme by having the 3 cash transfer programmes in one registry. This is a great move which will reduce the flows experienced in the systems.
However, the Registry should not only create a data base of
beneficiaries from all programmes but should also track beneficiaries until they are able to graduate. As a public scholar I recommend the Ministry of labour and social services and its partners should develop A strategy for non-labour
constrained households who have the potential to graduate to entrepreneurship and gainful employment. This will help in eliminating increased dependency
on social safety nets.
Secondly, the government of Kenya has scaled up the uptake of the universal health cover though not much has been discussed on the inclusivity of disabled persons to this well intended programme.
However, Today, the risk of childbearing related deaths has become rare among Kenyans mothers. Infant deaths have also declined significantly, while more children
can now live beyond their fifth birthdays than before. Although non-communicable diseases are emerging and threatening the health of many people, the health
system has grown stronger and more resilient to be able to eliminate this threat. The county and national government need to enhance the human resource capacity in the health sector and reduce the cost of health by also adapting a single registry in both public and private hospitals which all the medics can access under privacy laws of the clients with out incurring extra charges as in the current situation. another aspect of promoting well being of citizens is the availability of water supply.
Scaling up urban projects to improve water and sanitation
The state of water and sanitation in Kenya is worryingly poor. Urban areas are prone to water borne diseases that break out almost every year. Recently,
Kenya experienced a Cholera outbreak that claimed more than 56 people, with the majority being Zin Nairobi.
is December 2019 Kirinyaga county is adding to the statistics.
Accordingly, the allocation to water and sanitation in the 2019 budget allocation was increased. in 2019. This is the highest level in five years, and though the nation has fiscal limitations, the allocation is justifiable to address water issues and
prevent disease outbreaks in the country. Despite the usual concerns on disbursements from the national treasury to the counties, the 2019 budget shows improvements, as 45% of the approved budget
was disbursed as of October 2019, compared to 2018 financial year. With such improvements, Kenya will be able to address its water and sanitation
problems in 2020.
On the other hand, the floods experienced in Kenya in November 2019 could have saved Kenyan millions of shillings if the ministry of water and irrigation had proper mechanism of conserving the rainwater.
Instead of the havoc caused and 152 lives lost we would have seen more water reservoirs being put in place.
The more challenging factor on this is that a dry spell will be kicking off and more request for food donation will take place as evidenced by the support by United states of America
https://www.nation.co.ke/news/Kenya-receives-Sh340m-food-aid-from-US/1056-5396952-egea2j/index.html

additionally, Social protection programmes have led to Kenyan households being able to afford more than one meal a day, achieve more diet diversity, afford more shoes
and clothes for their children, attain some level of education, and empower small scale farmers. However, recently there have been concerns among stakeholders
regarding the administration of these programmes, which the Government should aim to adequately address. These efforts should help reinstate donor confidence
in the administration of these programmes.
All in all, the government of Kenya has highly enhanced the development of well-crafted legal frameworks which now need to be executed for the benefit of the most marginalized and vulnerable members of our society.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

DREAM OF DISABLED KENYANS. A speech on 3rd December to commemorate the international day of persons with disabilities in Kenya. Author Mugambi Paul

As Lopita Nyong’o said “dreams are valid”

I am humbled and grateful as your Cabinet Secretary.
The Makueni governor,

My principle secretary,
NCPWD board and secretariat.,
The ministry of labor social services.
Distinguished disabled persons, wananchi hamjambo?

I’m preaching to the converted when I say that getting a job and having a job is an absolute game-changer in everybody’s life and that shouldn’t be any different for somebody who has a disability or somebody who lives without one.
The importance of the independence, the self-confidence, the skills and the connections to society and community that are created when you have a job are absolutely essential and not the least of which it means you have an income.
needless to say, we are committed as a Government around employment for all Kenyans but in my position as the Cabinet secretary for Labor and Social Services I’m very focussed on disability employment.
My one simple goal as the cabinet secretary responsible is to make sure we give Kenyans who have a disability access to the full suite of opportunities in the employment sector – whether it be self-employment, open employment, supported employment or other types of employment.
In other words, it is absolutely essential we continue to focus on that.
I want every Kenyan living with a disability who has the capacity to work to get a job.
In particular, I want to see more opportunities for every person who’s able to get into open employment, to actually be open employment.
I want to make sure that employers see employing a person with a disability as just a mainstream, everyday activity.
I want everybody who’s living with a disability to gain from the big for agenda plan by the president.

Furthermore, with respect to the world of work, Kenyans living with disabilities have historically faced serious challenges and barriers impeding their access to employment.
This represents a violation not only of their rights, but a loss for our societies and economies. Many persons with disabilities continue to face discrimination
with respect to opportunities and outcomes in the Kenya world of work.

According to Thorkil Sonne, Chairman of Denmark’s Council for Corporate Responsibility and Sustainable Development Goals (
“Results from many employers show that it makes good business sense to provide inclusive work environments for people with disabilities. You will get the
work done, and also harvest positive side-effects such as higher engagement, higher retention rate, joy of work, sense of purpose and improved management
skills in the workplace.”
Unfortunately, employment in Kenya does remain an issue for people with disability – I’m not telling you anything that you don’t know.its a proven fact that many employers in both public and private entities have continuously practiced marginalization and discriminatory tendencies [ILO 2017 Whiteford 2018]
For instance, some employers have failed to consult disable employees and thus arbitrarily transferring them.
This must stop since it causes mental distress and frustrate the employees with disabilities.
To make matters worse no provision of reasonable accommodation and measures are put into place.
As a government we shall take actions to ensure especially the public entities provide platform of consultation as envisaged in in the 2010 constitution. This is well supported by ensuring reasonable accommodation as enshrined in the UNCRPD and the public service disability mainstreaming regulations 2018.
My ministry will set the example by ensuring this is followed to the latter.
I also take note of Participation in the workforce for people with disability which is lower than those that live without a disability [daily nation 2015]
Participation rates for people without disability continues to improve in our workforce but participation rates for people with a disability hasn’t [Mugambi 2017[
In fact, at the moment there’s a 70-percentage point difference between the participation rate for people who are without disability and those with a disability.
Additionally, we are absolutely committed to make sure that we fix that problem and there is every reason that we can with the help of the people that are here in Makueni.
Improving employment outcomes is a high priority when it comes to disability and I’m sure that it’s absolutely the highest priority for Kenyan government.
But equally we understand that as Kenyan government there are things that we need to do, levers that we need to pull, policies that we need to put in place to ensure that we give you the best opportunity to deliver on behalf of the people in Kenya with disability.

Today, I wanted to talk about some of the key policy levers:
Social protection strategy.
NCPWD strategy
Persons with disability bill 2019.
Draft disability policy
National action plan on accessibility.
At the end of the day, my decisions are guided by what is best for the individual and that must be guided by the feedback that I get from individuals who live with disability and from people like you who engage on a day-to-day basis with the employment sector.
I hope the national employment authority, NCPWD, federation of Kenya employers and other stakeholders will be keen to realize this dream and vision of ensuring Kenyans with disabilities get to the job market.
Its clear in my mind employment of persons with disabilities is the most absolutely needful priority of all times.
We thank the NCPWD for the last 16 years for endeavoring to reach out to employers.
NCPWD through the disability mainstreaming have helped employers to get themselves up to speed in understanding what it is to employ somebody with a disability but, most importantly, to retain those people in the workforce.
Over the next 3 years, my ministry will collaborate with partners and ensure we commit to reducing the unemployment rate among Kenyans with disabilities.
This is through having substantial reforms which will ensure improved employment outcomes.

I am keen to hear back from you as to how you think things are going and what you would like to see us doing in the future so that we ensure that we maximize the opportunity for every Kenyan with a disability who wants to work to be able to get that job and keep it.
In other words, this will ensure disabled persons are at the co plans and get to participate in public policy reforms and implementation.
Moreover, A crucial element in all our efforts to increase the employment outcomes for people with disability is the attitude of employers.
It’s disappointing to see that whilst research points to the fact there is a desire for employers to employ people with disability, that desire doesn’t often translate into actual action.
A lack of confidence appears to remain in the wider employment sector about employing people with disability.
I want to work with you on how we encourage greater understanding in the employment sector about the huge benefits of employing somebody with a disability.
If we can just get the employers through the door, they will be able to understand that with the right support people with a disability can be some of the greatest employees that they will ever have.
I think that’s what we need to make sure to continue.
We can do better; we will do better and I’m sure working together that that outcome will actually be achieved.
We need to make sure we give people with disability access to the full suite of options for employment – be it self-employment, supported employment or mainstream private and public sector.
Lastly I promise Over the coming 12 months the Department will be working with all sectors, whether it be your sector, whether it be people with disability, whether it be the business community or county governments, to make sure that we develop a Disability Employment Strategy that starts to mainstream disability employment into everybody’s vocabulary.
Because clearly everybody benefits, absolutely everybody benefits, when more Kenyans are in working.
Lets all work towards achieving the global commitments we made in July 2018.
In conclusion can I just say thank you so much for the opportunity to be here today.
I hope you have a fantastic Christmas holiday.
Kindly do not drink and drive.
Kenya needs you more.
Happy new year 2020

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

“Open letter to the Newly NCPWD chair” Mugambi Paul

“Open letter to the NCPWD chair”
Mugambi Paul

This letter is sent to our newly Chair of the NCpwd:
Dear sir,
Kenyan persons with disabilities
want the same opportunities as everyone else in the community – somewhere to work, somewhere to live, somewhere to enjoy the company
of family and friends, the chance to follow their passions and interests. We want NCPWD that makes these things possible – not stands in their way.

Using the ideas that have been collected for the last 15 years.
I have come up with the three C’s: three useful targets to help get the NCPWD
back on track. 1. Control

Kenyan persons with disabilities must be in the driver’s seat. It is their experience and their views that must determine priorities and drive change. Choice and
control must not be undermined or restricted by poor policies and processes.
For instance, it should no longer be business as usual for the Blind and vision impaired persons to receive brailed version of vision 2030 after a decade when it was out.

No disabled representative is at the building bridge initiative! Persons with disabilities must be empowered by their experience in the NCPWD, not further disempowered
and marginalised. And above all we want good outcomes for everyone –not just those who are educated, or well-resourced or who have an advocate.

So how do we make this happen?
list of 5 items
• Quicker, simpler and easier processes. Simple and plain communication that is easy to understand, more so for persons with developmental disabilities and Deafblind etc

• More help for people, families and carers at every stage of the process including application for assistance, peer support and advocacy

• Fully functioning and fit for purpose IT system that works for both consumers and producers of disability services at the county and national levels.
participants and providers

• Focused and resourced attention on groups who need more support – such as those with complex needs, severe disabled persons, Blind and those who have never been hard.

• More staff to clear backlogs. And competent well-trained staff with the right experience and expertise
Additionally, a 51 per cent disability employment target across all levels of the NCPWD including senior leadership. Currently
just 25 per cent of the NCPWD workforce have a disability.
Furthermore, on the public service I believe more needs to be done to stop the disability community
being shut out of public sector jobs
.
The 5 % has the target did not go far enough, given the consistent decline of employees with disability
in the sector.
According to public service survey 2015 Kenya has not yet achieved even 1 % target of employment opportunities to persons with disabilities.
I opine that targets needed to be supported by a comprehensive strategy to address the “unacceptably low” employment rates of people with disability
across the APS and in mainstream employment more generally.
A Kenyan National Jobs Plan to fix systemic problems that people with disability face finding and keeping a job.

This plan would include measures to strengthen the transition of young people with disability from school into tertiary education and mainstream jobs,
and would integrate with the social security system to support people with episodic disability moving in and out of employment.
Moreover, a whole-of-government and whole-of-community approach is needed to enable employers to create meaningful, flexible and inclusive employment, make workplaces
more accessible, remove discrimination and build positive employer and community attitudes.

2. Certainty

Persons with disabilities, their families and carers want to know the NCPWD will be there for them when they need it. Those who have made applications want to know
services will be there when and how they need them. And for those who do not have an assistances, other programs and services must continue. No one should be left
without support because Kenyan government can’t get it together.
Instructively, Kenya has been on top from the global disability forums that no one should be left behind.
So how do we make this happen?
list of 5 items
• Full funding should be enshrined in the upcoming national and county budgets and persons with disabilities 2019 bill

• Active support and intervention to make sure people have a diverse range of quality services to choose from. Intervene early to prevent failure and lock
in crisis support so no-one falls through the cracks

• Independently let NCPWD become policy formulator and a facilitator instead of an implementor.
For instance, immediate action on the way NCPWD works with other systems like health, justice and transport. All levels of government must sit down and work out how to synchronize services instead of making disabled persons to suffer.

• Greater develop and resource of the Information, Linkages and Capacity Building program. This will ensure NCPWD funds the disability persons organization to further efforts of advocacy instead of fighting each other.

• New timeframes for entry into the NCPWD, plant and equipment approvals and plan reviews;

• More help for people to navigate the NCPWD and get their assistance plans into action including more support for advocacy; and

• Targeted outreach for people who require additional support such as children, people who are Blind, psychosocial support and or Culturally or
Diverse backgrounds.
list end
but also initiate or restoration of other programs and services
that support people with disability, their families and carers
list end this should be reflected in the county and national levels.

3. Community

The NCPWD was never intended to work in isolation. The gap in life outcomes between those with a disability and those without will never close without action
in all areas of life – employment, health, education and transport are all areas that need immediate action.

So how do we make this happen?
list of 3 items
• Greater attention and resourcing to the Kenyan National Disability Strategy

• Immediate action on employment, education, housing, transport and health. Targets must be set – and met.
More so the big four agenda.

• An immediate timeline for a board of trusty’s actions in issuance of
funding

I observe that All across the country persons with disabilities
, their families and carers and people who work in the sector have been holding formal and informal forums in the social media, mainstream media and public forums. events and coming together to demand
urgent change.
Obviously, many policy makers know what’s need to be fixed but they aren’t doing so.
As the chair you need to listen to us. After all, people with disability and their families know what is and what is not working when it comes to the NCPWD –
and we know how best to fix it.
Scholars and researchers have recommended
The disability persons organizations should join together with a government and work collaboratively so we can get the ncpwd working well for everyone who needs it.
This is very true in many countries.
NCPW is a body mandated to promote and protect equalization of opportunities and realization of human rights for disabled persons in Kenya to live dignified live.
as a public policy scholar, I affirm that and There is no question that when the NCPWD works it absolutely changes lives. We see its life-changing power every day. But, for too many people, the NCPWD
is not working well. It is too complex and too bureaucratic – and as a result some people are falling through the cracks while others are missing out altogether,
we know of some truly heartbreaking stories of people who are really being let down by the NCPWD. There are people with disability waiting two years
for a wheelchair, there are persons with disabilities waiting for the disability card for 7 months, there are blind persons awaiting a braille display but told to have a white cane etc
There are families pushed to breaking point without essential support for their child. There are people hospitalised as a direct result
of the stress of trying to work their way through a bureaucratic nightmare.

“Situations such as these cannot be allowed to continue. That is why, today I have written this letter. calling on the new chair to
listen to persons with disability and commit to getting the NCPWD working the way it should – the way it is mandated in respect to the UNCRPD, SDG and the Kenyan constitution.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Autism Is My Superpower By a Guest writer. Michael R. Whary

Autism Is My Superpower
It does not matter what sixty-six percent of people do in any particular situation.
All that matters is what you do.
John Elder Robison, Look Me in the Eye
My parents were concerned because my speech was not as advanced as other children
at age two and a half and I did strange things like lining up all my toys in rows
throughout the house, spinning around in circles, and throwing tantrums. In addition,
my motors skills such as running and hand strength were delayed. I also had a lot
of trouble with balance.
My neurologist recognized the signs immediately and informed my parents that I was
autistic. My parents asked what my long-term outlook might be and they were told
that I would most likely never be independent. They were told that because of my
lack of motor skills I probably would never be able to ride a bike, motorcycle, or
drive an automobile. This news made my parents very sad as they had lost my older
brother in childbirth two years earlier.
My parents immediately enrolled me in speech and occupational therapy classes. I
don’t remember much about it, but they said I went to classes five days a week for
four years. Early on my parents believed that if they could get me enough training
that somehow I would
outgrow or no longer be autistic. As I went to classes later I noticed that almost
all of the parents believed the same thing. It wasn’t just about helping their children
fit into society. It was also about trying to hide the autism from the world. A lot
of the kids sometimes felt like Rudolph in the movie
Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer
 when his dad tried to hide his red nose.
While my autism caused me to develop slower than other children in some areas it
also gave me some abilities that others didn’t have. I learned my alphabet at age
one and I could read at a fourth grade level by eighteen months. In preschool the
teacher always read a story before naptime to the class, but was so amazed at how
well I could read that I took over and was the official storyteller for my preschool.
It was easy for me to read the words on the page fluently, but I had difficulty having
a simple conversation.
My dad had been a star athlete in high school and college, but because of my delayed
motor skills I was not able to play organized sports early on. I really wanted to
follow in his footsteps because he enjoyed football so much, but it just wasn’t possible.
Instead I joined the Cub Scouts. It was so much fun, and at each meeting I learned
a new life skill, from cooking to tying knots to hiking. It was also the first time
that I spent a lot of time with neurotypical children. This was important because
I would copy how the other scouts acted and that’s how I learned to interact and
take part in organized events. All of the physical activity improved my motor skills
too.
I earned the Arrow of Light Award and the Cub Scout Super Achiever Award because
I had earned every pin that the Cub Scouts offered.
Since I had such a wonderful time in Cub Scouts I bridged over to Boy Scouts. It
was not an easy transition as Boy Scouts are “boy run.” This means that I was no
longer taking classes from patient adults, but being given orders from older scouts
who were in high school. It was difficult because I could not process what they wanted
me to do as quickly as regular developing children. I was sometimes overlooked for
leadership positions and not given a chance. I did come home very upset sometimes,
but I always remember my father saying, “If
it’s easy everyone would do it. It’s the hard that makes it great.” He always knew
what to say to motivate me. I doubled my efforts and slowly I was able to do the
jobs that were needed and in turn I was given positions of responsibility.
I believe that scouting is very good for autistic children because they learn hands-on
life skills through merit badges. An Eagle Scout must have twelve Eagle required
badges and twenty-one total merit badges to even be considered. The Eagle requirements
are very difficult. Everything from First Aid, Citizenship, Accounting, Family Planning,
and Physical Fitness are learned along the Eagle Trail. I currently have all of the
Eagle required badges and a total of forty-five merit badges. I enjoy learning new
things from the experts in the field who teach the merit badges. My favorite was
the Aviation merit badge. We went to an actual flight school and learned all about
navigation, instruments, weather conditions, and the different planes. We then got
to ride in a small plane and I even got to fly it for a little bit. It was amazing!
When I was thinking about an Eagle Scout project there were so many options to consider.
The churches all needed help with their facilities, and all of the fraternal organizations
like the Elk, Moose, and Veterans clubs had things I could have helped with, but
none of the options seemed quite right.
Then a little over a year ago I came down with a terrible fever and my mother took
me to the emergency room. The EMT who was there took my information and when they
were told I was autistic the doctor asked him to stay in case they needed to hold
me down while I got shots. I guess the doctor had experience with other children
on the spectrum. I calmly allowed them to give me the shots and the EMT and doctor
were both shocked when I didn’t put up a fight.
The EMT stayed with me and asked a lot of questions about being autistic. Then he
followed us out into the parking lot and explained why he was asking all the questions.
It seemed that his nephew had just been diagnosed with autism and he and his sister
were very upset. With a tear in his eye he told us that I was such a well-mannered
young man and in control of my surroundings, which gave him hope for his nephew’s
future. He said that I inspired him and he was so
happy that he met me.
As I thought about what he had said it came to me that maybe I could help other parents.
I could make them understand that autism is not something to be ashamed of and that
if their child is on the mid to higher end of the spectrum anything is possible.
I want parents to embrace their children for who they are and not carry the guilt
that they did something wrong. According to the CDC, one in forty-two boys in the
USA is somewhere on the autism spectrum. If I could inspire new parents who are so
devastated by the news then maybe I could make the world a better place.
Currently, I am a high school sophomore and enjoy playing the piano and the trumpet
in our marching band and jazz band. I’m also in ROTC and was honored by being inducted
into the Kitty Hawk Honor Society for members with good grades. I take advanced classes
and I am on track to graduate with honors. I currently have a 3.75 GPA. I threw shot
put and discus for my school’s track team and also ran the 100-meter dash. I will
be attending a university upon graduation. I am hoping to get accepted into the Wharton
Business School at Penn, or another Ivy League school, but if not then possibly Baldwin
Wallace University in Berea, Ohio. After graduation I would like to own my own business,
possibly in computers.
How would I define my autism? I was never considered an “Aspie” because of my diagnosis.
I use the word “autistic” because it is a word most people understand, but in the
end it is just a word. To be honest my answer may sound strange, but I am not defined
by my autism. I am Michael Whary. I cannot be defined by any set “definition.” What
I have learned is that no matter who you are or what disabilities you have to overcome
in this life if you want something badly enough anything is possible! God gave everyone
a special gift, a “superpower” if you will. Autism is mine. It has taught me to overcome
my physical, mental, and social difficulties.
Every year we celebrate my birthday with a cake and candles as most people do. When
I blow out the candles and make a wish it’s always the same, “I wish that all of
the suffering in the world would end and in so doing there would be peace on Earth.”
I thank the powers that be for giving me this life. I thank my parents for their
guidance, patience, love, and understanding. And I wish nothing but good things for
others on the autism spectrum.

The Road Map to Canaan for the disabled Kenyans after the Global summit

Global Disability Summit’s commitments need to be reflected in governments’ national policies.
The persons with disabilities in Kenya have seen a new dawn.
This is after the Kenyan government endorsed the Charter for Change during the Global Disability Summit, a “first of its kind” event organised by the UK Department
for International Development (DFID), along with the Government of Kenya and the International Disability Alliance. This is now a clarion call to the Kenyan government to ensure
that their strong stance and work on disability in international cooperation is reflected in our own national policies.
The Global Disability Summit, which took place on the 24th July in London, gathered over 700 representatives from Disabled Persons’ Organisations, Civil
Society, Governments, and the Private Sector. It aimed to mobilise new global and national commitments on disability, especially in regard to international
cooperation and development. It was preceded by the Civil Society Forum, which provided an opportunity to highlight current issues relevant to the global
disability movement and work on the realization of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) [1]
I opine that the disabled persons in Kenya have not achieved much from the 2003 ACT, draft national disability policy 2006, national action plan 2015 concluding observations 2015 made at the UNCRPD.
Despite the policies, regulations and constitutional provisions protecting persons with disabilities, marginalization and lack of voice continue to engulf the disabled person in Kenya.

Other policy makers argue that Kenya doesn’t lack good written policies but poor execution. This is also accompanied by due to slow pace of implementation and lack of capacity.
For instance, disabled musicians, sports men and women play to the second fiddle when being supported by the government.
Another example is the inaccessible government offices.
history all over the world has showed that positive change for disabled people comes when a strong and vibrant disabled people’s movement campaigns
effectively for justice. We know from experience that such change does not come from spontaneous innovation by ministers. We need development that does
not leave any disabled people – or anyone else – behind. The global summit commitments were loud and clear that the governments and development partners need to direct their energy of empowerment and strengthening the ability of disabled civil society in Kenya
this is by holding the Kenya government to account against the pledges they have made. After all Government acknowledges disability as a phenomenon that cuts across all spheres of society and which requires support from all actors.
Furthermore, the Kenyan parliamentarians with disabilities do not have any excuse of not pushing the repealing of the 2003 persons with disability act in order to aline it with the UNCRPD, the 2010 constitution, SDG and now the global summit chatter.
It is my humble submission that with the new cabinet secretary and principle secretary the Kenyan disability movement will have a disability bridge initiative in order to realize the set commitments through a tangible action plan.
Moreover, the Cabinet secretary can appoint a 5 persons task force for a period of 4 months to lay the new way of operatializing and prioritizing the disability commitments.
This can be achieved by ensuring budgeting and aligning functions to the relevant ministries and creating enabling environment for the new development partners as well as retaining the traditional partners.
. The task force can be mandated to ensure they deliver by having the public access of information which has been reviewed, assessed and published in accessible formats and on a regular basis.
This will promote transparency and accountability of the commitments made.
In addition, the plan should reflect the will of the disabled persons where they want all government and private institution to embrace disability inclusion.
The cabinet secretary can get a pull of resourceful persons from persons with disabilities.in order to enable the direct consumers who know where the shoe pinches.
“Nothing about us without us”

the CS and the principle sectretary should join the
International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt of the UK who stated:

“It is fantastic to see such ambitious commitments made from countries and organisations from around the world at today’s Global Disability Summit.

“But, if we are going to help people with disabilities to fulfil their true potential, today cannot just be about words – it has to be about action.

“That’s why we need to hold ourselves and our partners to account and make sure these commitments produce genuinely transformative results for people with disabilities world

Paul Mugambi is a senior public policy consultant and a social discourse commentator.