The dream of saving the disabled Kenyans Author Mugambi Paul.

We’ve come a long way, with disabled Kenyans having more opportunity than ever, but there’s still a long way to go.
Since 1992, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD) has been annually observed on 3 December around the world. The theme for this 2019
IDPD is ‘
Promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership: taking action on the 2030 Development Agenda’. The theme focuses on the
empowerment of persons with disabilities for inclusive, equitable and sustainable development as envisaged in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,
which pledges to ‘leave no one behind’ and recognizes disability as a cross-cutting issues, to be considered in the implementation of its 17 Sustainable
Development Goals.

My hope is that Kenya will reach a point where basic education about acceptance and inclusion is no longer imperative.

I hope we’ll reach a point where it’s commonly understood that people with disability have the same rights to independence, employment, respect and access
to facilities as everyone else.
And I believe finding jobs for the thousands of Kenyans with disability who dearly want work is an essential part of getting there.
As a public policy scholar, I observe, it’s difficult for a blind person to land a job, even with stellar qualifications. A blind person with an associate degree is statistically less likely
to be employed than a sighted high school dropout.

Often, employers who don’t have experience working with disabled persons can’t conceptualize
how a disabled candidate can perform the job’s duties.
It makes matters worse employers who have experienced working with disabled persons are the barriers of enabling the Kenyan disabled to be employed.
As Helen Keller once said, “The chief handicap of the blind is not blindness, but the attitude of
seeing people toward them.”
These ungrounded fears contribute to the persistently low employment rates for disabled people.
Statistically as research shows at list in a population of 10 disabled Kenyans 8 are not employed.

To shift attitudes and make a difference — more people with disability need to be supported in the workplace.
I opine that most employers do not know that disabled people aren’t in the workforce, meaning employers are missing out on the benefits of hiring people with disabilities, including improvements in profitability,
competitive advantage and innovation.

Moreover, I grew up in a rural set up. where my community never bought into who I was — and made my world not as accessible as they possibly could. I had a great struggle to accomplish my educational journey,
where I faced discrimination and not treated as a peer. I believe right now,
There are many people with disability hoping to engage in work and the community more broadly and receive the opportunities that I was given so naturally.

They deserve the opportunity to be employed and fulfil their potential as much as anyone else in the African community.

I know what I most want to achieve as I celebrated my 22nd Birthday of being Blind.
Secondly my dream is
What I most want is for the community to use IDPwD as a launching pad for further action.

At this year’s celebration I hope governments, individuals and organizations will take the opportunity to commit to one concrete action towards removing barriers to accessibility
and inclusion for disabled Kenyans.
This is not too much to ask!
Get your workplace to give a person with disability a job.

Look for ways you can make your organisation, building or website more accessible for people with disability.

Create a paid internship program to help people with a disability get the skills they need to find a permanent job.

Provide anti-discrimination and bullying training to your staff — particularly those in customer facing roles.

If I can convince one person to roll up their sleeves and create a job for a person with disability or improve accessibility and inclusion within the community
— I’ll be satisfied with my contribution as a public scholar and expert in diversity and inclusion.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Ableism and being ableist Author Mugambi Paul

Before you read this please keep in mind: my goal is not to demonize or shame people. A lot of the ableism I have encountered since I lost my “eye sight on 27th October 1997” are things
others with vision loss have been working to fix for generations. My ableist behaviours that I wasn’t aware of in the past can hopefully serve to open other
people’s eyes (blind pun unintentional). It was privilege that allowed me to ignore my lack of knowledge.
I used to be a shy and easy to inculcate ideas.

My goal here is to help and highlight ways that can become steps to build change. I hope that we, together, will be working towards understanding how us
actions and words establish an environment that puts up barriers, destroys ambition and steals independence.
Through this we can promote social inclusion.
What is being ableist or ableism? I will let you go to Urban Dictionary for a far better description than I could probably come up with:
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Ableism
.

Who does it? I know I have, my family, friends and of course random strangers do it. How does someone stop themselves from doing it? We, we can start
by not making assumptions, by asking questions, and recognizing that the person with the disability is the expert on their situation.

This is a huge subject, just like racism, sexism or any other form of bigotry – there are overt and covert ways it occurs. I don’t know enough to point
out all the different ways it happens. This paragraphs post isn’t going to be nearly long enough to cover more than some of my experiences (because that’s
what I know). Taking that in account, I want to explore it, make people aware and maybe stop someone from offending a person just because of their incorrect
assumptions.

Quick examples:

list of 5 items
1. It’s the person that thinks you can’t do something because you have you can’t see or have other ________ disability.
2. People that assume that when you blind you can’t even hear!
3. The person that just starts “helping” without knowing what you are doing or are able to do.
4The subtle and not so subtle ways people treat you differently.
5The people that think they are just more capable at doing things because you have ______. blind
6 The people that are sure they know a cure for my Blindness______.
list end7. Able bodied Actors and comedians, MC
‘s who act as Blind or other disabled individuals!

check out Nairobi Memoires and get the life time experiences recorded in 2015 2016

I know what I am capable of (most of the time) and at times acutely aware of what I can’t do. Part of learning to adjust to living with a disability is
figuring that out and building solutions to make stuff work for you. It is sometimes a real challenge to find an issue and then coming up with a solution.
Everybody with a disability or impairment does this, even those who discover that the best option for them is to choose not to do something.

On any given day, in the city of Nairobi I have been grabbed by strangers (at least twice) in an attempt to give unwanted and misguided assistance. They grab my arm to guide me, grab
my cane to steer me and try to pull me into the street while I am waiting for the light to change.
One day my Whitecane brokedown after the push and pull!
Sometimes people have good intentions but at list communicate!
Recently I was chosen to be part of a interview, a story for another day. Sometimes even in the job market when they see a blind or vision impaired person, they assume I couldn’t participate. Sometimes not given a chance to display the skills They thank me for my time and
sent me on my way. As someone that is Public scholar, I believe we have a long voyage.
, this reminds of what I will have to deal with.

Learning, problem solving, and dealing with a world not built to be accessible is hard and at times overwhelming. Then, you work through it and next time
it is hopefully easier. Having people that assume you can’t don’t make it any easier. Just dealing with people that make my mobility difficulties worse
can be exhausting. Finally, there is actually doing things I want/need to do.
I thank Canberrans for their humbleness and understanding.
You are guys from another planet.
I admire the communication when we meet.

To the Nairobians, the next time you encounter a person with a blind and vision impaired, don’t make any assumptions. Some of us have undergone through a pretty extensive training on using a white cane,
crossing a street and orienting ourselves while travelling.
Thanks to vision Australia and guide dogs am confident and I am able to travel with ease.

The same goes for people with hearing, physical, mental or any other disability. In some ways the folks with invisible disabilities have a much more difficult
existence. You look like you aren’t disabled to other people but meanwhile you are trying to find ways to make a world not designed to be accessible to
bend, and to not be a barrier to doing the things we want/need to do.

At the same time, about privilege. Some people have lived their lives without a vision impairment my way of adjusting may appear different
than someone that has dealing with this for years or a lifetime. None of it is wrong, the way you respond might be. Judgement, assumptions, and lack of
knowledge is what I feel are the greatest barriers.

Mugambi Paul is a public policy expert and diversity and inclusion.

Twelve Crimes of being disabled in Kenya Author: Paul M. Mugambi.

Twelve Crimes of being disabled in Kenya
Author: Paul M. Mugambi.

Twelve Crimes of being disabled in Kenya
Author: Paul M. Mugambi.

1. Only in Kenya where most government documents are written “physically challenged” in reference to persons with disabilities.
2. Only in Kenya both Government and private sector demand for a driving lisence even when they know Blind and Deaf-Blind persons will never drive on the Kenyan roads. Thus, denial of employment opportunity.
3. Only in Kenya we pay for the long and dreary processes of acquiring the disabled card while the national identity card is readily available and its free.
4.
Only in Kenya where government service providers one has to explain his or her disability before service is offered or denied. I wonder if other non-disabled citizens undergo this trauma.
5. Only in Kenya where Kenya revenue Authority demands renewal of tax exemption certificates to the disabled persons as if the permanent disabled persons got a miracle. You wonder why Kenya claims to be an IT herb while the KRA system can’t just update itself.
6. Only in Kenya where the invisible disabled persons are not recognized and lots of explanation is done.
7. Only in Kenya persons with disabilities have to organize themselves to educate service providers of their roles and responsibilities in service delivery to disabled persons.
8. Only in Kenya where most government offices are either inaccessible or located in inaccessible places.
9. Only in Kenya most government websites are in accessible and do not offer alternative formats in documentation.
10. Only in Kenya where most public and private adverts are written “Persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply” but they don’t take any extra measure to ensure disabled persons are brought on board.
11. Only in Kenya where disabled persons pay for the “disabled car sticker” for packing and even the disabled packing is already occupied by the non-disabled individuals.
12. Only in Kenya where disabled artists, musicians, sportspersons beg for government or private sector sponsorship to participate in both local and international events and obligations.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Paul Mugambi is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Reprogrammable braille could shrink books to a few pages”  

Reprogrammable braille could shrink books to a few pages
Elastic bits with memory could eliminate the need for gigantic volumes.

Jon Fingas, @jonfingas
07.24.18 in AV
Braille hdisplays have made the digital world more accessible to those with vision issues, but readers who prefer the portability of a book haven’t had
that upgrade. Even a typical book might require over a dozen volumes of braille paper, which rules out reading during a summer vacation. Harvard researchers
could shoon whittle that down to a far more convenient size, though, as they’ve crafted reprogrammable braille that could eliminate the need for unique
pages without the bulk of a display.
The concept is straightforward. The team compressed a thin, curved elastic shell using forces on each end, and then made indents with a basic stylus (similar
to how you print a conventional braille book). Once you remove the compression, the shell ‘remembers’ the indents. You can erase them just by stretching
the shell. It sounds simple, but it’s incredibly flexible: in its tests, Harvard could control the number, position and chronological order of the indents.
There’s no lattice holding it up, and it works with everything from conventional paper to super-thin graphene.
This is still rudimentary. While you can store memories in the shells, you can’t perform computing tasks with them. You’d need a more sophisticated platform
to control page changes. If that happens, though, braille books could be considerably more accessible. That could be helpful for long trips where you’re
searching for something to read, but it might also be incredibly valuable for schools that could easily send braille literature home with students.
Harvard’s concept for reprogrammable braille
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