The Deep Crises in the Kenyan disability sector Author Mugambi Paul.

Kenya is a country faced ultimately by many challenges as a developing nation.
Issues of disabled persons seem to be hanging in the Kenyan movie of activities.
No one or any institution seems to understand how to handle the first pace changes taking place in the global disability sector.
The disability sector seems to be blaming each other for the failures and the inadequacies felt by the wanjikus with disabilities.
Issues ranging from lack of representation in the building bridge initiative, lack of adequate data from the Kenyan bureau of statistics to delayed
Service delivery.
Let me not dwell on the Corana virus.
As a public policy scholar let be engrain me to the importance of collecting desegregated
data for disabled. Persons.
According to standard media, the release of additional census data by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS) should be a wake-up call to policy makers in both the county and national governments. The numbers present valuable information on trends and patterns within the country’s demographic that should inform policy decisions and resource distribution
This was after the realise of the numbers byt the Kenya bureau of statistics. Unfortunately, for disabled person it was a bitter peal to take having lots of expectations.
The data presented seem to have reduced the numbers of persons with disabilities.
What happened?
The reality check indicates the lack of proper representation and lack of technical knowhow of disability data desegregation took place.
did the disability sector participate in the cycle of activities at the Kenya bureau of statistics?
The data released seems to be negative.
Reasons?
First application and training of the use of the Washington group of questioners was not properly conducted.
Secondly no pilot activity was done on how to collect disability desegregated data.
Thirdly the training of enumerators was a second thought.
Fourthly, were the organization of disabled persons involved in the process?

Facts for consideration:
It is well known. That
An estimated one billion people worldwide live with disabilities. Of the world’s poorest people, one in five live with disabilities.
Notable, in developing nations like Kenya conditions where we lack material resources as well as opportunities to exercise power, reach our full potential, and flourish in various aspects of life. (WHO and World Bank, 2011).
Globally, People with disabilities were not listed as a priority in the Millennium Development Goals. This is also true in the Kenyan context where disabled persons are not listed in the big 4 agenda. As a result, there is exclusion from many development initiatives, representing a lost opportunity to address the economic, educational, social, and health concerns of millions of the Kenyan’s most marginalized citizens (UN, 2011). In contrast, for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, United Nations member states pledged to leave no one behind, recognizing that development programming must be inclusive of people with disabilities.
Expected irreducible minimum:
To ensure disability-inclusive development, disability data must capture the degree to which society is inclusive in all aspects of life: work, school, family, transportation, and civic participation, inter alia. Disaggregating disability indicators will allow us to understand the quality of life of people with disabilities, towards developing programs and policies to address existing disparities.
Opportunity for Kenya disability movement:
Kenyan disability movement should stop board room meetings among themselves and join where the cake is being mashed and prepared.
At the Global Disability Summit in July 2018, the World Bank announced new commitments on disability desegregated data support to countries.
Specifically, the Bank pledged resources to strengthen disability data by scaling up disability data collection and use, guided by global standards and best practices.
This commitment is aligned with the World Bank’s October 2015 pledge to support the 78 poorest countries in conducting household surveys every three years. Regular household surveys are an excellent option for disability measurement, as they can be stratified to oversample people who are more likely to experience limited participation in society. In multi-topic household surveys, disability data can be collected along with other socioeconomic data, enabling a richer analysis of the experiences of people with disabilities. Finally, regular household survey programs can measure the change over time and space in key indicators such as the frequency of types of disability, severity of disability, quality of life, opportunities and participation of people with disabilities, and rehabilitation needs. For example, the recently launched 50×30 initiative may offer a good opportunity to collect disaggregated farm- and rural-related indicators by disability status
The Kenyan disability sector should stop ghetorization of disability issues and we shall realize real mainstreaming when we speak to where barriers exist.
It is encouraging that more disabled persons in the social media are demanding a specific census for persons with disabilities.
Weather this will be executed time will tell.
All in all, we need a model survey for disabled persons in order to have proper planning and ensure we get the Kenyan national cake.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.