Will the “Disabled” Kenyans cry foul after being left in Coronavirus conversations? Author Mugambi Paul

In order not to live the disabled Kenyans who are the largest minority, who make up 15 % of the population.
I opine, disabled Kenyans they deserve not to be left behind.
There is an urgent need for Ministry of health in Kenya to address the rights and needs of disabled person throughout all COVID-19 planning and response.
In other words, for maximum community results in the recent updates from the national and county governments there is the need to close the glaring gap of inclusivity.

Available facts:
Children and adults with disabilities and older adults are 2-4 times more likely to be injured or die in a disaster due to a lack of planning, accessibility, and accommodation. Most people with disabilities are not inherently at a greater risk for contracting COVID-19, despite misconception that all people with disabilities have acute medical problems.
Kenyan government Actions taken now can make a big difference in COVID-19 outcomes
Additionally, the disability sector from both the state and non state actors need to raise the voice not just to remain mum.
Are disabled persons represented at the national emergency committee established by the president?
Are the needs of the disabled catered for in the contingency plans?

Lessons learnt:
One of the greatest lessons in the fight of HIV aids in Kenya is that the disabled persons were not involved nor consulted in the plans strategies for combating the menace.
It took few disability stakeholders to get the national aids control council to ensure inclusivity is realized.
When shall the disabled stakeholders learn not to be left behind?
Should the disability society be involved after the rest of the population? we
Moreover, USAID was very critical in supporting disabled stakeholders in achieving active disability engagements.
Worst still, many disabled persons weren’t aware of how to prevent themselves from the HIV AIDS infection. Many disabled Kenyans died, and many being taken advantage of by the society perceptions and behaviours [HI 2007]
This is because of the late response to the needs of disabled persons.
Several studies showed the greater involved of disabled Kenyans in awareness, contributed to reduction of stigma and discrimination associated with disability and HIV aids.
It also ensured representation in National aids committees, and prevention promoted reduction of spread of the disease. [NACC 2008, Liverpool 2007 HI 2007[.

Role of the disability sector:
Needless to say, disability stakeholders can play a crucial role by facilitating support to the ministry of health on inclusive strategies which will address the needs of the disabled Kenyans.

Legal Obligations and Training
On the other hand, Public and private agencies that provide services to persons with disabilities must be aware of their legal obligations and must train their employees appropriately. When public and private agencies and businesses are unclear about their legal responsibilities, there are no limitations in providing greater than minimum levels of support and services to persons with disabilities. Lack of understanding is NEVER an acceptable reason for failing to meet legal obligations, including throughout emergency circumstances.
Furthermore, the ministry of health has a has a legal obligation to provide equal access to public health emergency services to disabled Kenyans, including throughout a pandemic since our president issued an executive order
Coupled with the support one of the pillars of the big 4 agenda, of Kenyan 2010 constitution on right to access to health services and international conventions.

Needs of disabled Kenyans:

I observe disabled Kenyans require the same resources and assistance that all citizens deserve.
in other words, adequate information and instructions, social and medical services, and protection from infection by those who might contracted the virus. However, some disabled Kenyans may have needs that warrant specific reasonable accommodation by the public and private sectors that may not be necessary for Kenyans without disabilities. This is not much to ask since the current strategies by both national and county governments have not addressed the reasonable accommodations.

For instance, Communications Authority has approved sending of bulk information messages on coronavirus by the Ministry of Health to all subscribers of local mobile phone operators.
I beg to ask:
Are persons with intellectual impairment, Deaf, Blind, psychosocial disabilities able to consume this information?
1. Can the government provide alternative formats of communication in awareness raising? Disabled Kenyans need to be informed of why Ministry of health believe that certain actions are warranted, to be given an opportunity to ask questions and receive answers in an accessible format, and to be afforded the opportunity to object and propose alternative solutions.
2. Another example, the Bagathi hospital has been designated to be the official self-quarantine place.
Has it met accessibility standards?
Are the beds easily accessible and user friendly to Kenyans with mobility impairments?
Moreover, in some places, the distribution of protective equipment, food, and medical supplies might be warranted. If Point of Distribution locations are established, government and private stakeholders must address how these supplies and equipment will be distributed and accessed by disabled Kenyans, elderly and others who have difficulties in movement and lack means of travel. Disabled Kenyans have the right to receive services in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs.
All in all, the existing legal protections of disabled Kenyans remain in effect under all circumstances. These protections are not subject to waivers or exceptions, even during public health emergencies or declared pandemics.
I Hope there will be no contrition on this journey of ensuring disabled become part of the solutions.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

The Deep Crises in the Kenyan disability sector Author Mugambi Paul.

Kenya is a country faced ultimately by many challenges as a developing nation.
Issues of disabled persons seem to be hanging in the Kenyan movie of activities.
No one or any institution seems to understand how to handle the first pace changes taking place in the global disability sector.
The disability sector seems to be blaming each other for the failures and the inadequacies felt by the wanjikus with disabilities.
Issues ranging from lack of representation in the building bridge initiative, lack of adequate data from the Kenyan bureau of statistics to delayed
Service delivery.
Let me not dwell on the Corana virus.
As a public policy scholar let be engrain me to the importance of collecting desegregated
data for disabled. Persons.
According to standard media, the release of additional census data by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS) should be a wake-up call to policy makers in both the county and national governments. The numbers present valuable information on trends and patterns within the country’s demographic that should inform policy decisions and resource distribution
This was after the realise of the numbers byt the Kenya bureau of statistics. Unfortunately, for disabled person it was a bitter peal to take having lots of expectations.
The data presented seem to have reduced the numbers of persons with disabilities.
What happened?
The reality check indicates the lack of proper representation and lack of technical knowhow of disability data desegregation took place.
did the disability sector participate in the cycle of activities at the Kenya bureau of statistics?
The data released seems to be negative.
Reasons?
First application and training of the use of the Washington group of questioners was not properly conducted.
Secondly no pilot activity was done on how to collect disability desegregated data.
Thirdly the training of enumerators was a second thought.
Fourthly, were the organization of disabled persons involved in the process?

Facts for consideration:
It is well known. That
An estimated one billion people worldwide live with disabilities. Of the world’s poorest people, one in five live with disabilities.
Notable, in developing nations like Kenya conditions where we lack material resources as well as opportunities to exercise power, reach our full potential, and flourish in various aspects of life. (WHO and World Bank, 2011).
Globally, People with disabilities were not listed as a priority in the Millennium Development Goals. This is also true in the Kenyan context where disabled persons are not listed in the big 4 agenda. As a result, there is exclusion from many development initiatives, representing a lost opportunity to address the economic, educational, social, and health concerns of millions of the Kenyan’s most marginalized citizens (UN, 2011). In contrast, for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, United Nations member states pledged to leave no one behind, recognizing that development programming must be inclusive of people with disabilities.
Expected irreducible minimum:
To ensure disability-inclusive development, disability data must capture the degree to which society is inclusive in all aspects of life: work, school, family, transportation, and civic participation, inter alia. Disaggregating disability indicators will allow us to understand the quality of life of people with disabilities, towards developing programs and policies to address existing disparities.
Opportunity for Kenya disability movement:
Kenyan disability movement should stop board room meetings among themselves and join where the cake is being mashed and prepared.
At the Global Disability Summit in July 2018, the World Bank announced new commitments on disability desegregated data support to countries.
Specifically, the Bank pledged resources to strengthen disability data by scaling up disability data collection and use, guided by global standards and best practices.
This commitment is aligned with the World Bank’s October 2015 pledge to support the 78 poorest countries in conducting household surveys every three years. Regular household surveys are an excellent option for disability measurement, as they can be stratified to oversample people who are more likely to experience limited participation in society. In multi-topic household surveys, disability data can be collected along with other socioeconomic data, enabling a richer analysis of the experiences of people with disabilities. Finally, regular household survey programs can measure the change over time and space in key indicators such as the frequency of types of disability, severity of disability, quality of life, opportunities and participation of people with disabilities, and rehabilitation needs. For example, the recently launched 50×30 initiative may offer a good opportunity to collect disaggregated farm- and rural-related indicators by disability status
The Kenyan disability sector should stop ghetorization of disability issues and we shall realize real mainstreaming when we speak to where barriers exist.
It is encouraging that more disabled persons in the social media are demanding a specific census for persons with disabilities.
Weather this will be executed time will tell.
All in all, we need a model survey for disabled persons in order to have proper planning and ensure we get the Kenyan national cake.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

“DISABILITY LENCE” The unspoken truth of the Kakamega school tragedy! Author Mugambi Paul

In the recent past more schools in Kenya are reporting deaths and newly disabled pupils in unclear circumstances. Yet we have lots of resources’ and commitments towards achieving sDG number 4 and meeting the Kenya 2030 vision.
Kakamega school is not the last in this zero-game played by lack of observation of accessibility standards.
Kenya has lots of different pieces of legislations which needs harmonization and have a clear state organ to lead in implementation.
In September 2019 a classroom crushed at Precious Talents Top School in Nairobi killing 8.
Up to now no one has been convicted nor a report produced.
How many more should die or get disabled?
I opine that Schools have become death traps for future leaders and different influencers.
The unspoken truth is that the lack of observation of built accessibility standards seems to be the major setback towards this issue.
How many more will die or get disabled so that policy makers will protect the innocent lives?
Schools are meant to be safe heaven away from the harsh times in Kenya.
I believe the different policy makers seem not to grasp what is ailing lots of buildings in the country.
Kenya seems to be mark timing on the root course of collapsing of buildings and stampede in build environment.
The voice of the disabled:
the disability sector in Kenya have maintained the traditional tune of wait and see who will blink first.
I observe that more persons have become disabled in search kind of disasters.
How are disabled persons included in disaster management?
How are the newly disabled persons included in the new club membership?
What are the support measures put in place to ensure the persons who have acquired disabilities have a smooth ride of inclusion?
According to different studies, it is moment like this when the disabled persons organizations and allies of the disability sector are needed to raise the voice of accessibility.
It would be prudent to see policy makers within and without the disability sector setting record stay straight on having national accessibility standards.
One of the commitments made by the Kenyan government is about inclusive education in July 2019.
Could the stakeholders in the disability sector stand up and make a statement?
Shall we continue to be left behind?
Disability media reporting:
This is one of the major gaps in the media industry.
The exact desegregated data of the newly disabled persons is not given nor reported.
Recommendation:
The national construction authority needs to conduct an accessibility audit of all schools.
This will aid the non-compliant schools to be shut down by the ministry of education.
The national construction authority has the capacity in resource mobilization and expertise in built environment.
Moreover, what they might need capacity on is technical support on conducting inclusive audits.
When will the ministry of education issue a decree on accessibility standards in school just like the way the Cabinet secretary ordered pregnant girls to be admitted in form one?
All in all, as a public policy scholar I believe disability mainstreaming will be achieved when all institutions take responsibility and not to wait for a policing unit to actualize inclusion.
When we make built environment accessible for all it benefits everyone not the disabled only.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.