Why the disabled Kenyans should stop word romancing in quest for inclusivity. Author Mugambi Paul

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Over the past few months, Kenya social media sites within the disability sector has been filled with romantic words of how we us disabled persons should be defined.
Many of the social media users argued for or against the statement “persons living with disability”
Putting my scholarly lenses, I will fall into the trap of using legal instrument.
This is evidently best settled by the clear definition which is quite elaborate in the UNCRPD.
It begs the question whether I live with my impairment or not. Does this really matter?
The pertinent response should be if as and individual or group we are receiving efficient, timely service delivery.
This matter of romantic wording should stop instantly and let focus the energies towards demanding for more improved service delivery in both public and private sectors.
As a matter of fact, the disabled in Kenya are too euphemistic and this clearly waters down the advocacy agenda.
As a public scholar and also a consumer of disability services have put the shoes and thus found to jot my reflections.
This is well informed by the virtue of Some discriminatory experiences
I have encountered within the Kenyan public and private service provision.
I observe there are allot of grey areas we need to focus.
For instance, accessible communication and information, transport provision for disabled persons, inclusive education, demand for employment opportunism etc.
I opine that the Kenyan disability sector has lost its way by being caught
up in politics and the self-interest of higher-ups. As [Peter 2019] affirms the disability sector can redeem itself.
Several reforms need to take place in order to assure and uphold the rightful place and a just society for the disabled in Kenya.
There is a plausible and workable solution
within reach to overcome many of the failures and inefficiencies of disability service provision, and these solutions should be grasped with two hands so that we
can turn this around.
For example, if a follow up response for last year’s open letter on my blog would have changed the narrative.

“Open letter to the Newly NCPWD chair” Mugambi Paul


to put it differently, disabled persons have solutions to the obstacles they face on a daily basis.
“we are the drivers of our destiny”
More importantly, Kenya made several global commitments in 2018.
This has seen several initiatives being pursued by government, international non-governmental organizations, private business sectors and disabled persons organizations.
According to my web-based research most entities in Kenya performed well in meeting their obligations but is this impact felt on the ground?
needless to say, the disabled persons in Kenya have a responsibility of accountability by asking.
Are these global commitments being implemented to achieve the said target population?
Are the global commitments made by Kenya in line with the Complies with its Obligations Under the CRPD?
Are tangible outcomes being experienced by disabled persons at the grassroots?
Success story
Moreover, beyond individual organizations’ progress against their commitments, there is evidence by ministry of labor in Kenya that Global disability commitments has had a wider impact in raising awareness, and increasing
prioritization, in relation to disability inclusion. For sure, disability inclusion as key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.
some of the ministry of labor success story include:
Launch of the National Action Plan on the implementation of the Global Disability Summit Commitments 2018
Development and an advocacy toolkit that will be used to strengthen dignity and respect for all.
Lastly, Establishment and launch of the Inter Agency Coordinating Committee to coordinate and monitor the implementation of the National Action Plan on the
implementation of the Global Disability Summit Commitments 2018. On the other hand, much needs to be done
by the consortiums in the non-governmental organizations.
most of them are still grappling with teething issues and set ups.
We hope in 2020 more research and global commitments outcomes will be felt on the ground.

According to June 2019 Kenya investment report and state social enterprise reports they do not have any reference to inclusivity aspect of disabled persons.
The report just mentions the term disability only in the reference of the social protection aspect of the Uwezo program.
This literally shows Kenya still has a long way towards getting proper participation of persons with disabilities and inclusive reporting.
All in all, the disabled a person and their organizations need to enhance the collaborative accountability mechanisms which will aid towards the realization of achieving the global commitments.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.