Why disability sector should be the leader in employment of the disabled! . Author Mugambi Paul.

Many initiatives in Kenya are in place for advancing the rights of persons with disabilities.
Most of the initiatives are led by international bodies, government, disability persons organizations and also individuals with disabilities.
Like in many other areas, Kenya has put in place progressive policy and legal frameworks with the intention of improving lives of Persons with Disability
The question on the unemployment of disabled persons has not be answered.
Should we continue with the same old tricks of finding solutions?
Are there no innovative ways of enhancing employment of the disabled persons in Kenya?
When will we stop board room discussions and ensure the largest minority get at list 5 % of the constitution threshold of employment?
What are the outcome of the global commitments on inclusive work?
According to the KBS 67% of the disabled population lives in poverty (2.97 million people).
Should these alarming statistics ring the bell to policy makers?
Kenya has seen gazettement of directorship of boards in the recent past.
Additionally, jobs are being advertised left, right and centers,
How many disabled persons have been included?
As a public policy scholar, I opine that the design, development and Implementation of disability related policy and legal frameworks have been weak.
Am not surprised that we do not have a living disability policy since the draft came out in 2006.

In order to address the unemployment among the disabled the disability sector itself needs to internally examine itself and retrace the why discrimination and stigma is rampant.

I believe we all know Stigma and discrimination lead to humiliating stereotypes and prejudices.
My opinion is that the disability sector should be the first to lead the route towards reduction of unemployment among the disabled Kenyans.
This is because the disability sector understands better about the disabled Kenyans.
How we live in poverty, have limited opportunities for accessing education, health, suitable housing and limited employment opportunities.
Some of my suggestions ae radical in nature.
I believe disabled Kenyans want to be productive members of society. Sometimes the disability sector amazes me when they advertise positions while they have in their data base many qualified individuals with disabilities.
How many employees with disabilities are in this sector?

Its not much to ask for government and private sector to improve access to basic education, vocational training relevant to labour market needs and jobs suited to skills, interests and abilities, with adaptations as needed.
In addition, the disability sector should be quick to advocate for inclusive vocation and technical training where the government is pumping allot of resources at the constituency levels.
The disability sector should be the leader in dismantling other barriers like making the physical environment more accessible, providing information in a variety of formats, and challenging attitudes and mistaken assumptions about people with disabilities
In other words, the disability sector should lead by example by operationalizing these dreams.
My second recommendation is the disability sector should comprehensively take on board disabled persons in internship and progressively employ the disabled for positions based on performance and qualifications.
Through these the disability sector will enhance visibility and promote employment of individuals with disabilities.
The disability sector can use these great good practices I to preach to both public and private sector on employment of disabled persons.
All in all individuals with disabilities want to have a Productive and decent work which will enable them to realize their aspirations, improve their living conditions and participate more actively in society

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Why the Blind Kenyans have Join the Drinking Nation Courtesy Of the society and Union for the Blind Author: Mugambi Paul

According to world health organization 2019 2.2 billion people, which represents 25% of the world’s population, have some form of vision impairment. Half of them do not yet have access to services,
80% in Africa alone

It’s estimated that about one and a half million Kenyans are either blind or vision impaired.
Furthermore, Many places within the City of Nairobi and other major towns in Kenya remain virtually and visually inaccessible to disabled persons.
These include restaurants, offices, entertainment joints, offices and health facilities among others.
Such public places; buildings, social amenities and facilities lack disability accessible infrastructure like lifts, ramps and designated parking.
Most entertainment joints in the city and major towns are nowadays located in back streets buildings. This makes their accessibility by the blind a nightmare, more so without the assistance of sensitive well-wishers.
The blind, vision Impaired and other disabled citizens in Kenyas’ fight for their rights has been met with hard resistance, ironically by the very systems that have put in place by the government and non state actors to uphold their rights.
In fact, these systems have disenfranchised the public participation in decision making processes like law making, putting the blind, vision impaired and other disabled at risk of serious injuries in busy public facilities, It’s terrifying, to say the least.
Unfortunately, The blind and visually impaired take risk move around every day in the shared spaces, some being so unlucky to have sustained injuries or killed all together.
It is hazardous even around car packs and buildings entrances.
As a blind person navigating such spaces, you are surrounded by loud noises, and large objects moving around you, always living in fear of getting crushed.
Sometimes you fear that you will get killed on road or car park with people in shared spaces never watching out for disabled persons, especially the blind and vision impaired.
I remember recently, a rogue driver crushed my white-cane; how far do you think the car was, from me?
Additionally, The County of Nairobi designed accessible traffic lights project which hardly meet the universally accepted accessibility measures, the project is a disappointed to the blind and the visually impaired.
Evidently, I tried to engage persons manning one of the trial traffic lights which proved to be futile, owing to the signature bureaucracy perpetuated in the management of county disability affairs in Kenya.
Disabled persons organizations and other stakeholders need to petition the Nairobi county government to ensure absolute access of the by the blind and the vision impaired to exact drop off points.
This will be reduce or avoid all together calamities associated with inaccessibility, and save the blind and visually impaired on the cost incurred in mitigation of the inaccessibility.
It is absolutely sad to note that the Nairobi county government banned the use of motorcycles within the city without providing an alternative for the vulnerable persons, which again boils down to exclusion of the blind in decision making.
This whole state of affair results to most blind and vision impaired persons having additional psychosocial disability, making them feel like second-class citizens.
The Kenya union of the Blind which is supposed to be the chief advocate for the blind and visually impaired persons is now busy creating and promoting “a blind and visually impaired drinking nation”
In the union’s Embakasi headquarters area, they have invested on butchery and a bar.
I won’t be surprised the Kenya society for the blind joining in the same breath since already they have commercialized its premises with garages and restaurants.

the Kenya union of the blind and the Kenya society of the blind have absconded their advocacy role in favor of investment.

The blind and the visually impaired persons in Kenya have been discriminated for far too long. Time is now that they ought to arise and claim their place in the public space.
The blind and visually impaired persons need to lobby policy makers and other community leaders to ensure accessibility for disabled persons is achieved.
The society and policy makers need to understand blindness is also a mobility disability.
The Persons with Disabilities Act 2003 partly states that persons with disabilities are entitled to a barrier free and disability-friendly environment.
The proprietors of public buildings and transport must endeavor to comply with this law, and the relevant authorities need to enforce compliance fairly and objectively.
When shall we ever move from theory to practice?
The views expressed here are those of the author, they do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity and inclusion expert.

Why the Kenya Revenue Authority should partake responsibility of tax exemption for the disabled Kenyans!

During the past 3 decades in Kenya there have been numerous changes in our society with respect to the management and treatment of people with disabilities.
Of course, there ar numerous success stories of actual improved disability mainstreaming.
How did the changes occur?
Many legislative and societal changes have taken place for instance, the disability act of 2003, the UNCRPD 2006 and the 2010 constitution and several disability related regulations. Furthermore, these gains have been necessitated by the lobbing and advocacy by disabled persons and their organizations.
On the other hand, Disability mainstreaming and work to end discrimination against disabled persons have been on both government and non-state actors’ agendas for decades. Why is disability mainstreaming still important?
Some of us feel that “everyone” in government and non-state actors who include development and human rights organisations are well aware of the issues. But the truth is that in organisations without
any explicit focus on disability mainstreaming or disability social justice, the levels of awareness for disability-based discrimination (and the need to end it) tend to be uneven.
Am not surprised by the inaccessible built environment, inaccessible information or the negative attitudes which still exist among the Kenyan society.

Efforts to promote disability equality remain limited and often isolated. Some would prefer to drop “disability” altogether, busy as they feel with all those other
issues that must be “mainstreamed” – good governance, environmental protection, HIV/AIDS prevention, “you name it!”

most government and private entities normally pass on the back when dealing with disability matters!
I opine that ignorance in the Kenyan society is very expensive for disabled persons.
Why should and institution require permission to offer disabled person a service?

As citizens we do not require permission to get a passport, when one has Malaria a disabled person doesn’t require permission.
Why does Kenya revenue authority run away from its responsibilities?
As long as one has uploaded the right documentation there is no need of putting more barrier for the disabled persons.
Why are policy makers silent on this injustice?
Most top government policy makers and stakeholders have done benchmarking of disability services in other countries and they know how good and proper systems work for the people.
Why are they not actualizing simple and impactful solutions to the disabled persons?

. But there are at least five reasons why “disability mainstreaming” must continue:
list of 5 items
1. Organisations that are committed to universal human rights have a responsibility to ensure their work respects and promotes human rights. Disabled rights
are human rights, enshrined in widely accepted international treaties as the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities UNCRPD 2006.

Any rights-based approach that neglects disabled persons rights is inadequate.

2. International movements and campaigns rally large numbers of disabled people. Disabled persons make the largest minority group in the world

if government institutions who are the planners, implementers and evaluators ignore disabled interests and needs, and refrain from
engaging disabled persons as interlocutors, collaborators and allies.
They will never get it right!
3. Many development and human rights agencies are into education and campaigning – i.e., they attempt to spread ideas around, and to mobilise others to
join them in their cause. The messages they convey, implicitly or explicitly,
influence people’s minds: research has shown that campaigning can reinforce or weaken people’s value systems – broadly speaking, what they consider to
be “good” or “bad”, “right” or “wrong”. (See for example the gender mainstreaming angle.
Hence, it is important to avoid reinforcing values that condone discrimination and other violations against disabled persons
which would be in stark contradiction with the development and human rights goals most of us defend.
The disability organizations need to take lead in voicing what needs to be don on tax related concerns.
Disabled persons should not just be raising concerns on the social media but take the demands to the Kenya revenue authority.
The Kenya revenue authority need to work along side disabled persons in order to ensure smooth and faster process is achieved.
4. disability -based violence is not only one of the most pervasive human rights violations, it also jeopardises development. For example, large numbers of disabled persons have experienced delayed service delivery due to the bureaucratic processes. For instance, delayed in tax exemption renewal, with
dire consequences for their physical well-being, their mental health and their social status. Getting tax exemption is right, but y risk their
lives because of high cost of transport, psychological wellbeing. The Kenya revenue authority should know that most disabled persons are unemployed and for those who do not get access to the service
are likely to feel abused, something is deeply wrong.
Additionally, the Kenya economy is highly affected by wastage of hours on the road.
The tax exemption should have been simplified through decentralization of Kenya revenue authority services at the county.
In other words, if the digitalization process ways actualized the staff at Kenya revenue authority would be able to automatically issue exemption certificates without delay.
The disability mainstreaming focal point person at Kenya revenue has to actualize the dreams of disabled persons by ensuring the system works beyond himself or herself.
Are there government institutions, private sectors who have been given tax relief by the Kenya revenue authority for promoting disability employment and improving access for disabled persons in Kenya?
5. In terms of efficiency, any organisation has a responsibility to serve the disable persons who need their service.
Disabled persons should not be treated as second class citizen in government services.
Siting an example in 2019 May the Kenyan government in collaboration with world bank launched the braille version of the 2030 vision which in essence non blind persons read a decade ago. Is this fair?
The Kenyan policy makers need to stop the mancantile policy process and adapt solution-oriented policy and procedures.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Kenya society for the Blind need to be led by Blind and vision impaired persons Author Mugambi Paul

Kenya society for the Blind need to be led by Blind and vision impaired persons
Author Mugambi Paul

believe this as much today as we did in 1940. Unfortunately, too many Kenyan people
still take literally the parable that says when the blind lead the blind,
both will fall into the ditch. In 1950 our hope said that a literal
interpretation was wrong, and our experience now confirms it day after day,
year after year, decade after decade.
This is when the formation of Kenya Union of the Blind took place.
Unfortunately most never lived to see the fruits of there labour as veterans.
This affirmed by the heroes and heroines in the Blindness sector who have either gone ahead of us.
Some of these have provided great leadership and others have refused to pass on the baton to the generations to come.
I affirm that Kenya union of the Blind is one of the sleeping icons in the country.
As an advocacy organ it has not put any government institution relating to blindness to reform or become accountable to the Blind and vision impaired .
The heroes and heroines in the Blindness sector are turning in to their graves asking what happened?
As I was explaining earlier,
i but parables, stereotypes, and legal beliefs do not easily give way
even in the face of evidence refuting them. Unfortunately, the Blind and visually impaired persons have rendered the public space to be run by others who are not blind or vision impaired.
Kenya society for the Blind is one great example where the blind and vision impaired think they can find solace but it’s all in vain.
Kenya institute for the blind is facing similar predicament.
When was the position advertised?
Was it accessible to the blind and visually impaired persons?
Aren’t there Blind and visually impaired professionals.
Why are we silent on this?
In other words, many professionals who are not blind have mastered to speak on our behalf and have largely misrepresented the Blind and thus the once vibrant blind and vision impaired sector is crying for social justice to prevail.
The blind and vision impaired persons need to scrutinize the positions of the Chief executive officers of these government entities so that they do not become permanent and deny able blind and vision impaired persons from serving their own.

As a public policy scholar, I opine the blind and vision impaired persons need to rise and bring cows back home.
This is to say the blind and vision impaired need to make important decisions on how the blind related organizations ran by government and nonstate actors through having the say.
Secondly as a blind person I know the shoe since am the wearer.
No amount of professional who is neither Blind or vision impaired can understand or have the experience we have.
Thirdly, no wonder Central bank of Kenya and the Kenyan media have collaborated to cheat the public that bank notes are accessible to us the blind and vision impaired persons!
Let the Blind and vision impaired come of age and do the needful.
We are grateful for the support you have offered us,
Let now the Blind and the vision impaired persons be the leaders in the sectors.
Am not surprised that the little kid the Albinism family has been able to build away from home and has fortunately claimed the national cake at its best.
Unfortunately they left the Mother and father “Blind and vision impaired” to suffer.
Furthermore, without blind once built their identity not only on helping the blind but in speaking for us, making
all important decisions for us, and being the interpreters through which
Kenya would hear from its blind unfortunates. Thanks to Kenyan constituent which recognizes the people as the owners and proclamation of public participation and a country that encourages us to reach for our day in the sun as we
pursue the Kenyan dream.
Will the Blind and vision impaired generation not have chief executives who are blind?
Will the future blind and vision impaired generation just see us in the profession of begging and teaching?
I hope the Kenyan blind and vision impaired person now can start to speak for ourselves, direct the
programs that serve us, and tell our communities what we need and which
service providers are delivering it. We still need professionals who learn
to teach the alternative skills we need and to develop ever-more-helpful
equipment, but we do not need these men and women to speak for us but with
us, sharing in the collaboration that creates, maintains, and evaluates
quality services.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.