A letter to Louis Braille from Blind compatriot and Author Mugambi Paul.

Lon post alert.
Happy birthday Louis Braille. You are 210 years.
I celebrate your courage and hope that you bestowed upon the Blind, vision impaired, Deaf Blind and other interested sighted counterparts.
You invented a language which has ensured that we aren’t beggars on the Kenyan streets.
You ensured am not a Cobra a story for another day when underestimation was the order of the day.
#Soyinka Lempaa
Imagine am your cobra would you bring your shoes?
# Tshrooh Benz Mamake Ozil would you cofee me?
Or you shall be the best and enjoy my company like #njeri Kinuthia Hinga?

I pay tribute to you for ensuring we the “Blind” do not become illiterate.
It took 200 years for the United nations to have this commemoration. World Braille Day is observed to raise awareness of the importance of Braille as a means of communication as a full realization of the human rights of the blind and vision impaired persons.
More importantly, Sighted crusaders in this era of digitalization would like to see “Braille” become extinct but as for me and by “Tribe mates” we won’t allow.
We shall continue to demand for alternative mode of communication as enshrined in the article 7 of the Kenyan constitution and article 9 of the UNCRPD.
Even if we receive 2030 vision braille copy in May 2019 while the rest of the country read for themselves in 2008.
We shall not relent.
Article 21 of the UN Convention on the Rights of persons with disabilities obligates member states to ensure that information intended for the general public is in
accessible formats such as braille, and as per article 24 of the CRPD countries are to ensure that in the education system, students who are blind receive
their education in the modes that are most appropriate to their needs, such as braille from educators who are fluent in braille.
Why should the sighted dictate what the Blind and vision impaired language should be?
Imagine if the whole country would be Blind.
All of us would use braille! Big 4 agenda will reach the blind 2025.
Just like you back in our compass days we had to memorize what was being taught or read by Mighty volunteers at Kenyatta university.
Am grateful for those heroes and heroines who were our volunteers.
In other words, am yet to understand how we the “Blind” survived the hardship of the Kenyan education system.”.
Am not being proud here
Many blind and vision impaired persons passed with flying colors and defeated the sighted counterparts who had all access to information.
Imagine if we had equal opportunities what can the Blind and vision impaired persons do?
to say the truth sir Louise Braille many of Blind and vision impaired persons are either teachers or beggars in Africa.
It’s sad to say as the sighted teachers get free teaching aid the blind and vision impaired teachers have to buy braille copies. For those who decided teaching is not their cup of coffee like me this is one of our daily struggles.
No wonder most Blind and vision impaired persons are poor than our counterparts.
This electronic braille device am using today costed arm and a leg while you the sighted counterpart bought a kabloti somewhere in Juja.
Shall we be equal really?
Back to history, the braille system began to spread worldwide in 1868 when a British group, now known as the Royal National Institute for the Blind, promoted braille’s
acceptance. Eventually braille swept the world and brought literacy to the blind in every language.
Although in Kenya not many blind and vision impaired have access to braille or even information.
Marking the centennial of Braille’s death in 1952, the French government proposed relocating your grave from your hometown of Coupvray to The Pantheon in
Paris, where many of France’s most important historical figures are interred. Braille, however, you had requested that you be buried in Coupvray, and the town’s
officials were reluctant to let your body be taken away. So an unusual compromise was struck. Most of your earthly remains were entombed at The Pantheon,
but your hands remain buried at the Church Cemetery in Coupvray.

I promise to visit your historical site so that I will cool my nerves.

Unfortunately, many of Blind and visually impaired persons globally are currently facing
several great problems specially for survival of their existence in
society due to adopting highly negative attitude by concerned
Government authorities in Kenya at national and county levels.
But, in the end, all of us will surely win this battel for survival
for our existence. We shall never forget you. Your legacy on this language lives on.
I hope and trust the newly blinded and vision impaired persons present, and future will join this battle.
What is Braille? Braille is a tactile representation of alphabetical and numerical symbols using six dots to represent
each letter, number and even symbols. Braille is essential in the context of education, freedom of expression and opinion as well as social inclusion as
reflected in article 2 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
My dream as public policy scholar and braille consumer is well articulated by my friend #Christine Simpson, “Braille is now more widely appreciated and understood across the community. We see braille included on street signs in many cities; on lift buttons; on
directional signage at transport hubs and in many larger buildings; on pharmaceutical product labels; and increasingly at tourist attractions, museums
and other places of public interest. The portability of braille available thanks to braille enabled devices has also made braille usage more appealing
to students and those who need to access information while on the move.”
At list for the reader today know that in braille language A is written as dot 1.
B is written as dots 1 and 2.
C is written as dots 1 and 4.
The comment box is open.
Join me in opening and shaking the Blind concoction to celebrate this special day.

Untold success story of the Cash transfer programme in Kenya Author Mugambi Paul

Rising inequality isn’t a new concern. Many countries in the global are facing this phenomenon.
Oliver Stone’s movie “Wall Street,”
with its portrayal of a rising plutocracy insisting that greed is good, was released in 1987. But politicians, intimidated by cries of “class warfare,”
have shied away from making a major issue out of the ever-growing gap between the rich and the rest.
The best argument for putting inequality on the back burner is the depressed state of the economy. Isn’t it
more important
to restore economic growth than to worry about how the gains from growth are distributed?
I will look at the social protection aspects in Kenya and how it has contributed to changing the lives of most vulnerable persons in the society.
Secondly, I will strive to highlight the misgivings of the global commitments.
To begin, the 2019 to 2020 Kenyan Budget raised the issue of implementing a Single Registry for all social protection programmes. This will improve the coordination of social
protection programmes, which have been highly fragmented leading to numerous inefficiencies. According to the social assistance project the ministry of labour and social services will highly improve the outcomes of the social protection programme by having the 3 cash transfer programmes in one registry. This is a great move which will reduce the flows experienced in the systems.
However, the Registry should not only create a data base of
beneficiaries from all programmes but should also track beneficiaries until they are able to graduate. As a public scholar I recommend the Ministry of labour and social services and its partners should develop A strategy for non-labour
constrained households who have the potential to graduate to entrepreneurship and gainful employment. This will help in eliminating increased dependency
on social safety nets.
Secondly, the government of Kenya has scaled up the uptake of the universal health cover though not much has been discussed on the inclusivity of disabled persons to this well intended programme.
However, Today, the risk of childbearing related deaths has become rare among Kenyans mothers. Infant deaths have also declined significantly, while more children
can now live beyond their fifth birthdays than before. Although non-communicable diseases are emerging and threatening the health of many people, the health
system has grown stronger and more resilient to be able to eliminate this threat. The county and national government need to enhance the human resource capacity in the health sector and reduce the cost of health by also adapting a single registry in both public and private hospitals which all the medics can access under privacy laws of the clients with out incurring extra charges as in the current situation. another aspect of promoting well being of citizens is the availability of water supply.
Scaling up urban projects to improve water and sanitation
The state of water and sanitation in Kenya is worryingly poor. Urban areas are prone to water borne diseases that break out almost every year. Recently,
Kenya experienced a Cholera outbreak that claimed more than 56 people, with the majority being Zin Nairobi.
is December 2019 Kirinyaga county is adding to the statistics.
Accordingly, the allocation to water and sanitation in the 2019 budget allocation was increased. in 2019. This is the highest level in five years, and though the nation has fiscal limitations, the allocation is justifiable to address water issues and
prevent disease outbreaks in the country. Despite the usual concerns on disbursements from the national treasury to the counties, the 2019 budget shows improvements, as 45% of the approved budget
was disbursed as of October 2019, compared to 2018 financial year. With such improvements, Kenya will be able to address its water and sanitation
problems in 2020.
On the other hand, the floods experienced in Kenya in November 2019 could have saved Kenyan millions of shillings if the ministry of water and irrigation had proper mechanism of conserving the rainwater.
Instead of the havoc caused and 152 lives lost we would have seen more water reservoirs being put in place.
The more challenging factor on this is that a dry spell will be kicking off and more request for food donation will take place as evidenced by the support by United states of America
https://www.nation.co.ke/news/Kenya-receives-Sh340m-food-aid-from-US/1056-5396952-egea2j/index.html

additionally, Social protection programmes have led to Kenyan households being able to afford more than one meal a day, achieve more diet diversity, afford more shoes
and clothes for their children, attain some level of education, and empower small scale farmers. However, recently there have been concerns among stakeholders
regarding the administration of these programmes, which the Government should aim to adequately address. These efforts should help reinstate donor confidence
in the administration of these programmes.
All in all, the government of Kenya has highly enhanced the development of well-crafted legal frameworks which now need to be executed for the benefit of the most marginalized and vulnerable members of our society.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

The dream of saving the disabled Kenyans Author Mugambi Paul.

We’ve come a long way, with disabled Kenyans having more opportunity than ever, but there’s still a long way to go.
Since 1992, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD) has been annually observed on 3 December around the world. The theme for this 2019
IDPD is ‘
Promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership: taking action on the 2030 Development Agenda’. The theme focuses on the
empowerment of persons with disabilities for inclusive, equitable and sustainable development as envisaged in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,
which pledges to ‘leave no one behind’ and recognizes disability as a cross-cutting issues, to be considered in the implementation of its 17 Sustainable
Development Goals.

My hope is that Kenya will reach a point where basic education about acceptance and inclusion is no longer imperative.

I hope we’ll reach a point where it’s commonly understood that people with disability have the same rights to independence, employment, respect and access
to facilities as everyone else.
And I believe finding jobs for the thousands of Kenyans with disability who dearly want work is an essential part of getting there.
As a public policy scholar, I observe, it’s difficult for a blind person to land a job, even with stellar qualifications. A blind person with an associate degree is statistically less likely
to be employed than a sighted high school dropout.

Often, employers who don’t have experience working with disabled persons can’t conceptualize
how a disabled candidate can perform the job’s duties.
It makes matters worse employers who have experienced working with disabled persons are the barriers of enabling the Kenyan disabled to be employed.
As Helen Keller once said, “The chief handicap of the blind is not blindness, but the attitude of
seeing people toward them.”
These ungrounded fears contribute to the persistently low employment rates for disabled people.
Statistically as research shows at list in a population of 10 disabled Kenyans 8 are not employed.

To shift attitudes and make a difference — more people with disability need to be supported in the workplace.
I opine that most employers do not know that disabled people aren’t in the workforce, meaning employers are missing out on the benefits of hiring people with disabilities, including improvements in profitability,
competitive advantage and innovation.

Moreover, I grew up in a rural set up. where my community never bought into who I was — and made my world not as accessible as they possibly could. I had a great struggle to accomplish my educational journey,
where I faced discrimination and not treated as a peer. I believe right now,
There are many people with disability hoping to engage in work and the community more broadly and receive the opportunities that I was given so naturally.

They deserve the opportunity to be employed and fulfil their potential as much as anyone else in the African community.

I know what I most want to achieve as I celebrated my 22nd Birthday of being Blind.
Secondly my dream is
What I most want is for the community to use IDPwD as a launching pad for further action.

At this year’s celebration I hope governments, individuals and organizations will take the opportunity to commit to one concrete action towards removing barriers to accessibility
and inclusion for disabled Kenyans.
This is not too much to ask!
Get your workplace to give a person with disability a job.

Look for ways you can make your organisation, building or website more accessible for people with disability.

Create a paid internship program to help people with a disability get the skills they need to find a permanent job.

Provide anti-discrimination and bullying training to your staff — particularly those in customer facing roles.

If I can convince one person to roll up their sleeves and create a job for a person with disability or improve accessibility and inclusion within the community
— I’ll be satisfied with my contribution as a public scholar and expert in diversity and inclusion.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.