The dream of saving the disabled Kenyans Author Mugambi Paul.

We’ve come a long way, with disabled Kenyans having more opportunity than ever, but there’s still a long way to go.
Since 1992, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD) has been annually observed on 3 December around the world. The theme for this 2019
IDPD is ‘
Promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership: taking action on the 2030 Development Agenda’. The theme focuses on the
empowerment of persons with disabilities for inclusive, equitable and sustainable development as envisaged in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,
which pledges to ‘leave no one behind’ and recognizes disability as a cross-cutting issues, to be considered in the implementation of its 17 Sustainable
Development Goals.

My hope is that Kenya will reach a point where basic education about acceptance and inclusion is no longer imperative.

I hope we’ll reach a point where it’s commonly understood that people with disability have the same rights to independence, employment, respect and access
to facilities as everyone else.
And I believe finding jobs for the thousands of Kenyans with disability who dearly want work is an essential part of getting there.
As a public policy scholar, I observe, it’s difficult for a blind person to land a job, even with stellar qualifications. A blind person with an associate degree is statistically less likely
to be employed than a sighted high school dropout.

Often, employers who don’t have experience working with disabled persons can’t conceptualize
how a disabled candidate can perform the job’s duties.
It makes matters worse employers who have experienced working with disabled persons are the barriers of enabling the Kenyan disabled to be employed.
As Helen Keller once said, “The chief handicap of the blind is not blindness, but the attitude of
seeing people toward them.”
These ungrounded fears contribute to the persistently low employment rates for disabled people.
Statistically as research shows at list in a population of 10 disabled Kenyans 8 are not employed.

To shift attitudes and make a difference — more people with disability need to be supported in the workplace.
I opine that most employers do not know that disabled people aren’t in the workforce, meaning employers are missing out on the benefits of hiring people with disabilities, including improvements in profitability,
competitive advantage and innovation.

Moreover, I grew up in a rural set up. where my community never bought into who I was — and made my world not as accessible as they possibly could. I had a great struggle to accomplish my educational journey,
where I faced discrimination and not treated as a peer. I believe right now,
There are many people with disability hoping to engage in work and the community more broadly and receive the opportunities that I was given so naturally.

They deserve the opportunity to be employed and fulfil their potential as much as anyone else in the African community.

I know what I most want to achieve as I celebrated my 22nd Birthday of being Blind.
Secondly my dream is
What I most want is for the community to use IDPwD as a launching pad for further action.

At this year’s celebration I hope governments, individuals and organizations will take the opportunity to commit to one concrete action towards removing barriers to accessibility
and inclusion for disabled Kenyans.
This is not too much to ask!
Get your workplace to give a person with disability a job.

Look for ways you can make your organisation, building or website more accessible for people with disability.

Create a paid internship program to help people with a disability get the skills they need to find a permanent job.

Provide anti-discrimination and bullying training to your staff — particularly those in customer facing roles.

If I can convince one person to roll up their sleeves and create a job for a person with disability or improve accessibility and inclusion within the community
— I’ll be satisfied with my contribution as a public scholar and expert in diversity and inclusion.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Why disability sector should be the leader in employment of the disabled! . Author Mugambi Paul.

Many initiatives in Kenya are in place for advancing the rights of persons with disabilities.
Most of the initiatives are led by international bodies, government, disability persons organizations and also individuals with disabilities.
Like in many other areas, Kenya has put in place progressive policy and legal frameworks with the intention of improving lives of Persons with Disability
The question on the unemployment of disabled persons has not be answered.
Should we continue with the same old tricks of finding solutions?
Are there no innovative ways of enhancing employment of the disabled persons in Kenya?
When will we stop board room discussions and ensure the largest minority get at list 5 % of the constitution threshold of employment?
What are the outcome of the global commitments on inclusive work?
According to the KBS 67% of the disabled population lives in poverty (2.97 million people).
Should these alarming statistics ring the bell to policy makers?
Kenya has seen gazettement of directorship of boards in the recent past.
Additionally, jobs are being advertised left, right and centers,
How many disabled persons have been included?
As a public policy scholar, I opine that the design, development and Implementation of disability related policy and legal frameworks have been weak.
Am not surprised that we do not have a living disability policy since the draft came out in 2006.

In order to address the unemployment among the disabled the disability sector itself needs to internally examine itself and retrace the why discrimination and stigma is rampant.

I believe we all know Stigma and discrimination lead to humiliating stereotypes and prejudices.
My opinion is that the disability sector should be the first to lead the route towards reduction of unemployment among the disabled Kenyans.
This is because the disability sector understands better about the disabled Kenyans.
How we live in poverty, have limited opportunities for accessing education, health, suitable housing and limited employment opportunities.
Some of my suggestions ae radical in nature.
I believe disabled Kenyans want to be productive members of society. Sometimes the disability sector amazes me when they advertise positions while they have in their data base many qualified individuals with disabilities.
How many employees with disabilities are in this sector?

Its not much to ask for government and private sector to improve access to basic education, vocational training relevant to labour market needs and jobs suited to skills, interests and abilities, with adaptations as needed.
In addition, the disability sector should be quick to advocate for inclusive vocation and technical training where the government is pumping allot of resources at the constituency levels.
The disability sector should be the leader in dismantling other barriers like making the physical environment more accessible, providing information in a variety of formats, and challenging attitudes and mistaken assumptions about people with disabilities
In other words, the disability sector should lead by example by operationalizing these dreams.
My second recommendation is the disability sector should comprehensively take on board disabled persons in internship and progressively employ the disabled for positions based on performance and qualifications.
Through these the disability sector will enhance visibility and promote employment of individuals with disabilities.
The disability sector can use these great good practices I to preach to both public and private sector on employment of disabled persons.
All in all individuals with disabilities want to have a Productive and decent work which will enable them to realize their aspirations, improve their living conditions and participate more actively in society

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Twelve Crimes of being disabled in Kenya Author: Paul M. Mugambi.

Twelve Crimes of being disabled in Kenya
Author: Paul M. Mugambi.

Twelve Crimes of being disabled in Kenya
Author: Paul M. Mugambi.

1. Only in Kenya where most government documents are written “physically challenged” in reference to persons with disabilities.
2. Only in Kenya both Government and private sector demand for a driving lisence even when they know Blind and Deaf-Blind persons will never drive on the Kenyan roads. Thus, denial of employment opportunity.
3. Only in Kenya we pay for the long and dreary processes of acquiring the disabled card while the national identity card is readily available and its free.
4.
Only in Kenya where government service providers one has to explain his or her disability before service is offered or denied. I wonder if other non-disabled citizens undergo this trauma.
5. Only in Kenya where Kenya revenue Authority demands renewal of tax exemption certificates to the disabled persons as if the permanent disabled persons got a miracle. You wonder why Kenya claims to be an IT herb while the KRA system can’t just update itself.
6. Only in Kenya where the invisible disabled persons are not recognized and lots of explanation is done.
7. Only in Kenya persons with disabilities have to organize themselves to educate service providers of their roles and responsibilities in service delivery to disabled persons.
8. Only in Kenya where most government offices are either inaccessible or located in inaccessible places.
9. Only in Kenya most government websites are in accessible and do not offer alternative formats in documentation.
10. Only in Kenya where most public and private adverts are written “Persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply” but they don’t take any extra measure to ensure disabled persons are brought on board.
11. Only in Kenya where disabled persons pay for the “disabled car sticker” for packing and even the disabled packing is already occupied by the non-disabled individuals.
12. Only in Kenya where disabled artists, musicians, sportspersons beg for government or private sector sponsorship to participate in both local and international events and obligations.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Paul Mugambi is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.