A letter to Louis Braille from Blind compatriot and Author Mugambi Paul.

Lon post alert.
Happy birthday Louis Braille. You are 210 years.
I celebrate your courage and hope that you bestowed upon the Blind, vision impaired, Deaf Blind and other interested sighted counterparts.
You invented a language which has ensured that we aren’t beggars on the Kenyan streets.
You ensured am not a Cobra a story for another day when underestimation was the order of the day.
#Soyinka Lempaa
Imagine am your cobra would you bring your shoes?
# Tshrooh Benz Mamake Ozil would you cofee me?
Or you shall be the best and enjoy my company like #njeri Kinuthia Hinga?

I pay tribute to you for ensuring we the “Blind” do not become illiterate.
It took 200 years for the United nations to have this commemoration. World Braille Day is observed to raise awareness of the importance of Braille as a means of communication as a full realization of the human rights of the blind and vision impaired persons.
More importantly, Sighted crusaders in this era of digitalization would like to see “Braille” become extinct but as for me and by “Tribe mates” we won’t allow.
We shall continue to demand for alternative mode of communication as enshrined in the article 7 of the Kenyan constitution and article 9 of the UNCRPD.
Even if we receive 2030 vision braille copy in May 2019 while the rest of the country read for themselves in 2008.
We shall not relent.
Article 21 of the UN Convention on the Rights of persons with disabilities obligates member states to ensure that information intended for the general public is in
accessible formats such as braille, and as per article 24 of the CRPD countries are to ensure that in the education system, students who are blind receive
their education in the modes that are most appropriate to their needs, such as braille from educators who are fluent in braille.
Why should the sighted dictate what the Blind and vision impaired language should be?
Imagine if the whole country would be Blind.
All of us would use braille! Big 4 agenda will reach the blind 2025.
Just like you back in our compass days we had to memorize what was being taught or read by Mighty volunteers at Kenyatta university.
Am grateful for those heroes and heroines who were our volunteers.
In other words, am yet to understand how we the “Blind” survived the hardship of the Kenyan education system.”.
Am not being proud here
Many blind and vision impaired persons passed with flying colors and defeated the sighted counterparts who had all access to information.
Imagine if we had equal opportunities what can the Blind and vision impaired persons do?
to say the truth sir Louise Braille many of Blind and vision impaired persons are either teachers or beggars in Africa.
It’s sad to say as the sighted teachers get free teaching aid the blind and vision impaired teachers have to buy braille copies. For those who decided teaching is not their cup of coffee like me this is one of our daily struggles.
No wonder most Blind and vision impaired persons are poor than our counterparts.
This electronic braille device am using today costed arm and a leg while you the sighted counterpart bought a kabloti somewhere in Juja.
Shall we be equal really?
Back to history, the braille system began to spread worldwide in 1868 when a British group, now known as the Royal National Institute for the Blind, promoted braille’s
acceptance. Eventually braille swept the world and brought literacy to the blind in every language.
Although in Kenya not many blind and vision impaired have access to braille or even information.
Marking the centennial of Braille’s death in 1952, the French government proposed relocating your grave from your hometown of Coupvray to The Pantheon in
Paris, where many of France’s most important historical figures are interred. Braille, however, you had requested that you be buried in Coupvray, and the town’s
officials were reluctant to let your body be taken away. So an unusual compromise was struck. Most of your earthly remains were entombed at The Pantheon,
but your hands remain buried at the Church Cemetery in Coupvray.

I promise to visit your historical site so that I will cool my nerves.

Unfortunately, many of Blind and visually impaired persons globally are currently facing
several great problems specially for survival of their existence in
society due to adopting highly negative attitude by concerned
Government authorities in Kenya at national and county levels.
But, in the end, all of us will surely win this battel for survival
for our existence. We shall never forget you. Your legacy on this language lives on.
I hope and trust the newly blinded and vision impaired persons present, and future will join this battle.
What is Braille? Braille is a tactile representation of alphabetical and numerical symbols using six dots to represent
each letter, number and even symbols. Braille is essential in the context of education, freedom of expression and opinion as well as social inclusion as
reflected in article 2 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
My dream as public policy scholar and braille consumer is well articulated by my friend #Christine Simpson, “Braille is now more widely appreciated and understood across the community. We see braille included on street signs in many cities; on lift buttons; on
directional signage at transport hubs and in many larger buildings; on pharmaceutical product labels; and increasingly at tourist attractions, museums
and other places of public interest. The portability of braille available thanks to braille enabled devices has also made braille usage more appealing
to students and those who need to access information while on the move.”
At list for the reader today know that in braille language A is written as dot 1.
B is written as dots 1 and 2.
C is written as dots 1 and 4.
The comment box is open.
Join me in opening and shaking the Blind concoction to celebrate this special day.