The Deep Crises in the Kenyan disability sector Author Mugambi Paul.

Kenya is a country faced ultimately by many challenges as a developing nation.
Issues of disabled persons seem to be hanging in the Kenyan movie of activities.
No one or any institution seems to understand how to handle the first pace changes taking place in the global disability sector.
The disability sector seems to be blaming each other for the failures and the inadequacies felt by the wanjikus with disabilities.
Issues ranging from lack of representation in the building bridge initiative, lack of adequate data from the Kenyan bureau of statistics to delayed
Service delivery.
Let me not dwell on the Corana virus.
As a public policy scholar let be engrain me to the importance of collecting desegregated
data for disabled. Persons.
According to standard media, the release of additional census data by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS) should be a wake-up call to policy makers in both the county and national governments. The numbers present valuable information on trends and patterns within the country’s demographic that should inform policy decisions and resource distribution
This was after the realise of the numbers byt the Kenya bureau of statistics. Unfortunately, for disabled person it was a bitter peal to take having lots of expectations.
The data presented seem to have reduced the numbers of persons with disabilities.
What happened?
The reality check indicates the lack of proper representation and lack of technical knowhow of disability data desegregation took place.
did the disability sector participate in the cycle of activities at the Kenya bureau of statistics?
The data released seems to be negative.
Reasons?
First application and training of the use of the Washington group of questioners was not properly conducted.
Secondly no pilot activity was done on how to collect disability desegregated data.
Thirdly the training of enumerators was a second thought.
Fourthly, were the organization of disabled persons involved in the process?

Facts for consideration:
It is well known. That
An estimated one billion people worldwide live with disabilities. Of the world’s poorest people, one in five live with disabilities.
Notable, in developing nations like Kenya conditions where we lack material resources as well as opportunities to exercise power, reach our full potential, and flourish in various aspects of life. (WHO and World Bank, 2011).
Globally, People with disabilities were not listed as a priority in the Millennium Development Goals. This is also true in the Kenyan context where disabled persons are not listed in the big 4 agenda. As a result, there is exclusion from many development initiatives, representing a lost opportunity to address the economic, educational, social, and health concerns of millions of the Kenyan’s most marginalized citizens (UN, 2011). In contrast, for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, United Nations member states pledged to leave no one behind, recognizing that development programming must be inclusive of people with disabilities.
Expected irreducible minimum:
To ensure disability-inclusive development, disability data must capture the degree to which society is inclusive in all aspects of life: work, school, family, transportation, and civic participation, inter alia. Disaggregating disability indicators will allow us to understand the quality of life of people with disabilities, towards developing programs and policies to address existing disparities.
Opportunity for Kenya disability movement:
Kenyan disability movement should stop board room meetings among themselves and join where the cake is being mashed and prepared.
At the Global Disability Summit in July 2018, the World Bank announced new commitments on disability desegregated data support to countries.
Specifically, the Bank pledged resources to strengthen disability data by scaling up disability data collection and use, guided by global standards and best practices.
This commitment is aligned with the World Bank’s October 2015 pledge to support the 78 poorest countries in conducting household surveys every three years. Regular household surveys are an excellent option for disability measurement, as they can be stratified to oversample people who are more likely to experience limited participation in society. In multi-topic household surveys, disability data can be collected along with other socioeconomic data, enabling a richer analysis of the experiences of people with disabilities. Finally, regular household survey programs can measure the change over time and space in key indicators such as the frequency of types of disability, severity of disability, quality of life, opportunities and participation of people with disabilities, and rehabilitation needs. For example, the recently launched 50×30 initiative may offer a good opportunity to collect disaggregated farm- and rural-related indicators by disability status
The Kenyan disability sector should stop ghetorization of disability issues and we shall realize real mainstreaming when we speak to where barriers exist.
It is encouraging that more disabled persons in the social media are demanding a specific census for persons with disabilities.
Weather this will be executed time will tell.
All in all, we need a model survey for disabled persons in order to have proper planning and ensure we get the Kenyan national cake.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Disability charity boss jailed after stealing from pension fund | Guest author Steven Morris

Patrick McLarry was guilty of ‘appalling dishonesty and a breach of trust’, the judge said. Photograph: Ben Mitchell/PA
Patrick McLarry was guilty of ‘appalling dishonesty and a breach of trust’, the judge said. Photograph: Ben Mitchell/PA
The former head of a charity has been jailed for five years after he admitted defrauding a pension scheme for workers with disabilities and using the money
to buy houses in England and France.

Patrick McLarry took more than £250,000 from the pension scheme of Yateley Industries for the Disabled and used it to buy homes for himself and his wife
and pay off a debt for a pub lease.

The charity was so badly affected by the sophisticated fraud that it came within days of closing and service users and staff have been left traumatised.

Sentencing him at Winchester crown court, the judge, Andrew Barnett, described the fraud as “an appalling dishonesty and breach of trust”.

He said: “You quite deliberately and in a very calculating way milked the fund of a considerable amount of money which was spent for your own needs and
your wife’s.”

Linda Matthews, the chief executive of the charity, said in a statement read to court that the pension scheme faced “significant difficulties” because
of the stolen funds and had led to “immense stress and anxiety” for staff and users.

Alex Stein, prosecuting, said McLarry carried out the fraud by setting up a new company to manage the pension fund, of which he was one of only two directors
and in the habit of authorising decisions.

He also set up a third company, which used the cover of trading in antiques to transfer the stolen money to France in order to buy two properties abroad
before creating a fictional loss to explain the missing funds. Stein said outside court: “This was a complex, sophisticated fraud undertaken over a number of years against vulnerable victims. Mr McLarry held himself
out as a pillar of the community, a legitimate businessman and a man with an MBE.

“It took a persistent and tenacious investigation to uncover one of the most substantial pension frauds prosecuted to date.”

Nicola Parish, the executive director of The
Pensions
Regulator, which brought the prosecution, said: “McLarry tried every trick in the book to hide his actions and squander the pension pots of those he was
responsible for but we were able to uncover the truth and bring him to justice.

“We will now work to seize assets from McLarry so that as much of the money as possible is returned to its rightful owners, who will rightly rely on it
to deliver their pensions in retirement.”

McLarry, from Bere Alston village near Plymouth in Devon, was also previously convicted of failing to disclose his bank statements to the regulator’s investigators.

McLarry’s wife, Sandra, 59, was initially charged with four counts of money laundering but at an earlier hearing the prosecution said it would not proceed
with the charges and offered no evidence. She was found not guilty.

Hampshire-based Yateley Industries has a onsite factory that trains and employs about 60 people with disabilities. It focuses on specialised packing, including
machine shrink-wrapping and boxing.

The work and pensions secretary, Therese Coffey, said: “Defrauding disabled people of their hard-earned pension savings is a despicable crime. I welcome
today’s sentence.

“This government will ensure that individuals who pocket people’s retirement funds feel the full force of the law. To protect savers further we are introducing
new laws, with a maximum jail term of seven years, for those who wilfully or recklessly endanger pensions.”

As 2020 begins… we should take great lessons and ensure we don’t enhance disability corruption.
For those who have been corrupt repent and repent time is coming when you will cry alone.
The friends and colleagues you have been eating with will no longer be with you.
Imagine the lives of the marginalized disabled persons you have ruined and denied them the opportunity to thrive or enjoy life just like you.

Crime,

Inside the Kenyan disability corridors of power Author Mugambi Paul

Over the past few years, the discourse agenda of many disabled Kenyans has been dominated by service delivery and public participation debate] Mugambi 2017] this is because both incredibly important issues. But amid these dominating subjects, have the voices of disabled Kenyans been hard?
Has Kenya improved its level of inclusiveness?
Globally, persons with disabilities are estimated to represent 15 per cent of the world’s population, but in many developing nations this percentage
can be significantly higher] world report 2011 UN enable 2011].
this is to say, population of 1.3 billion, disabled persons constitute an emerging market the size of China. Their Friends and Family add another 2.4 billion potential consumers who act on their emotional connection to PWD] Ilo 2017].
Together, PWD control over $8 trillion in annual disposable income] ILO 2016].
The aging Boomer population is adding to the number of the disabled daily. As Boomers’ physical realities change, their need and desire to remain active in society dovetails with the demands of PWD. This group controls a larger share of the national wealth than any previous generation. Does Kenya government know this?
Just like many developing nations Kenya is on automobile settings on matters disability inclusion.
Most public policies are well woven but poorly executed. This is quite evidenced by the rare and sometimes absence seen in leadership and decision-making roles, the visibility in
popular culture and media are low, absence of disabled representation in key policy decision organs and stakeholders, and recognition of the work as thought leaders and influencers is almost non-existent. What has been happening?
The Kenyan government has strongly concentrated on developing policies geared towards social safety nets. In other words, the Kenya government sees disabled persons as people who need care and do not deserve to contribute to the economy.
Debatably, if the Kenyan government could turn the coin, they would gain more tax collection from this single largest minority in Kenya.
This can be achieved once the government realizes and focusses on effective, first service and maximization of social assets] Whiteford 2018].
How will Kenya government meet the sustainable development goals 2030?
How will the vision 2030 be achieved?
How will the big 4 agenda be achieved?
The reality is disabled Kenyans have been left behind.
This has led to artist and disability activist to start to compose or entertain with the song “do not live us behind”
As evidenced in twitter tags and music.
Moreover, The work of the disability rights
movement often consists of them highlighting their absence from the public domain.
In other words, most regulations and legislation on disability are still shelved in the cabinet. this has led to continuous charity model of delivery of service with out clear roadmap towards right based approach. This is affirmed by the implementation of education policy practises etc
Needless to say, its popular for public and private organisations to claim that they are being inclusive, yet retention rates remain low for disabled people in most organisations, with very
few moving into positions of leadership or responsibility.

I observe, A key factor in understanding inclusion is that it lies in the eye of the beholder. Many organisations have good intentions on inclusion, yet their staff
members from minority groups don’t feel comfortable and leave within a short period. For other organisations inclusion is a reality, so long as everyone
fits in and conforms to company culture] eddy robber 1988].

It’s very easy to say you are being inclusive, it’s another matter to be viewed as being so by those who are the target for being included. I don’t want to sound like a broken glass “why should someone claim his or her organization, yet a disabled person can’t access a toilet?”
According to my findings Most people mean
well, but they forget their unconscious behaviours. Very few people are comfortable with stepping back to allow a person from a minority group (like a
disabled person) to take an opportunity over themselves. Even fewer seem comfortable with a disabled person being their supervisor.
Could this be one of the reasons of the low rate employment recorded by Kenyan public service report
in 2015?
There are those who consider inclusion to be not “seeing” a person’s difference. This isn’t inclusion, its assimilation.
There isn’t much point in having disabled employees to your team if they aren’t valued for their contribution. This seems like an unnecessary thing
to say, yet social media has heard many stories about disabled staff who are never sent the documents in a format they can read
and work on, or aren’t given time to hear what is happening via their interpreter, and even highly experienced employees who are never given the opportunity
to speak and share their views. They are, quite literally, token appointments.
As a public policy scholar and with lived experience on disability, I affirm that the focus must shift from charity model and have accommodation to a plan focused on specific actions to attract customers and talent in disabled persons markets.
Even the available market opportunities for the disabled are being snatched under our noses.
Why aren’t we represented in many government bodies?
Who is supposed to audit the leadership gaps in the disability sector?

All in all, many disabled people work in invisible ways, shifting ground from within existing business and government structures. This work is just as important, just
as necessary, as the work of those who use the public domain to challenge assumptions and perspectives on disabled people. Internal institutional barriers
need to be addressed as much as social assumptions and social policy. Without taking our place as 15% of Kenyan employment and leadership we won’t be in a position to
challenge the ableist structural barriers which deny an equitable disabled presence across the public and private domains.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Why disabled academicians in Kenya have botched the fellow disabled! Author Mugambi Paul

Approximately 15% of the world’s population lives with some form of disability, according to a 2011 World Health Organization report.
Its expected by July 2020 the Kenya bureau of statistics will author new numbers.
Going by the world report and UN estimate we are 6 million with disabilities.
Historically, Disabled persons worldwide have become conscious
Of their rights] un 2018].
for instance, for disabled Kenyans in particular, decolonization held additional possibilities and potential. National independence promised
not just majority rule but also an all-inclusive citizenship and the commitment to social justice. Among the blind and visually impaired of Kenya, such collective
aspirations led to the birth of the Kenya Union of the Blind in 1959. In 1964, after years of futile correspondence with government officials, the Union
organized a street march to the prime minister’s office to attract attention to its grievances. The result was a government panel, the Mwendwa Committee
for the Care and Rehabilitation of the Disabled, whose published report became the blueprint for social and rehabilitation programs.
More importantly, in the early 90’s evolution of disability persons organizations led to high demand for government to put in place legislative measures.
Therefore, Kenya was not left behind and thus a formation of a taskforce in 1993by the longest serving attorney general in Kenya Mr Amos Wako.
It seems to be a torturous journey to achieve mere policy or regulations concerning disabled Kenyans.

Moreover, it took 10 years to have the persons with disabilities act of 2003.
This seemed to be an act of charity just because the then president Kibaki had joined the club [Eddy Robert 1874]

Unfortunately, even to date the national disability policy still remains in draft format!
Where did we go wrong?
Academicians with disabilities are strangely not in the scene.
To put it differently not much academic research has been conducted.
the Kenyan disability discourse need to be changed by scholars.
I observe that researchers need to establish what has worked in promoting disability right in Kenya.
What circumstances ensured change of policies or regulations?
What are lessons learnt?
The current dispensation of the disability agenda is either led by disability elitist, technocrats who are either nor committed to the realization of the disability inclusive agenda.
Other stakeholders are disabled persons who have wealth of lived experiences and who most have pursued different careers other than contributing to this discourse.
Should disabled academicians continue being at the periphery?
What’s need to be done:
As scholars with disabilities and who have lived experience of disability we need to where the academic lenses and fertilize the disability agenda in Kenya.
There exists lots of gaps which I believe can be addressed by research and can shape the public policies intended to serve persons with disabilities.
Am not surprised that Kenya has not yet understood which model of service to pursue. Either the current model of charity which has contributed to the disempowerment of disabled persons in Kenya or the social model which empowers and enables the disabled persons to make their choices and live in dignity.
Additionally, the definition of and understanding the path to pursue on it her disability inclusion or special needs is an area yet to be resolved.
As a disabled person who is a Blind and also a scholar, I wouldn’t like the notion of imagining that a certain entity or institution owns any disabled person.
The truth of the matter we us disabled person were born free it’s the society which has chained us. I am a believer in disability inclusion therefore I do not expect disabled to be directed or lamped into a single source of service delivery.
Best practise:
I assert with the new executive order by the interior ministry on issuance of passport, national identity card and birth certificate of ensuring Kenyans get within one day model,
This offers a rare of hope and should spread to all government entities for effective service delivery.
More importantly, disabled Kenyans have been marginalized in many fronts more especially in getting relevant documentation.
Are we expecting change?
The Kenyan society needs to affirm that all services need to be inclusive as much as possible.
In other words, the different stakeholders need to acclimatize with the reality that Kenyans want effective, easy and accessible service delivery.
This will aid towards meeting realization of vision 2030, sustainable development goals and the global commitments 2018.
Through search processes we can have lots of contribution in having a new dispensation of disability in Kenya.
Nevertheless, with achievement of great strides, the best practises which might arose from implementation of the new directive by the ministry of interior can facilitate the improved versions of regulations targeting disabled persons.
On the other hand, As I had said in my previous articles the reappealing the 2003 act will take place in 2021 and it seems my words will pass.
All in all, academicians with disabilities need to rise up and contribute to the direction and shape the opinions of transforming Kenya.
This can be done in different models and mediums.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Why the Kenya Revenue Authority should partake responsibility of tax exemption for the disabled Kenyans!

During the past 3 decades in Kenya there have been numerous changes in our society with respect to the management and treatment of people with disabilities.
Of course, there ar numerous success stories of actual improved disability mainstreaming.
How did the changes occur?
Many legislative and societal changes have taken place for instance, the disability act of 2003, the UNCRPD 2006 and the 2010 constitution and several disability related regulations. Furthermore, these gains have been necessitated by the lobbing and advocacy by disabled persons and their organizations.
On the other hand, Disability mainstreaming and work to end discrimination against disabled persons have been on both government and non-state actors’ agendas for decades. Why is disability mainstreaming still important?
Some of us feel that “everyone” in government and non-state actors who include development and human rights organisations are well aware of the issues. But the truth is that in organisations without
any explicit focus on disability mainstreaming or disability social justice, the levels of awareness for disability-based discrimination (and the need to end it) tend to be uneven.
Am not surprised by the inaccessible built environment, inaccessible information or the negative attitudes which still exist among the Kenyan society.

Efforts to promote disability equality remain limited and often isolated. Some would prefer to drop “disability” altogether, busy as they feel with all those other
issues that must be “mainstreamed” – good governance, environmental protection, HIV/AIDS prevention, “you name it!”

most government and private entities normally pass on the back when dealing with disability matters!
I opine that ignorance in the Kenyan society is very expensive for disabled persons.
Why should and institution require permission to offer disabled person a service?

As citizens we do not require permission to get a passport, when one has Malaria a disabled person doesn’t require permission.
Why does Kenya revenue authority run away from its responsibilities?
As long as one has uploaded the right documentation there is no need of putting more barrier for the disabled persons.
Why are policy makers silent on this injustice?
Most top government policy makers and stakeholders have done benchmarking of disability services in other countries and they know how good and proper systems work for the people.
Why are they not actualizing simple and impactful solutions to the disabled persons?

. But there are at least five reasons why “disability mainstreaming” must continue:
list of 5 items
1. Organisations that are committed to universal human rights have a responsibility to ensure their work respects and promotes human rights. Disabled rights
are human rights, enshrined in widely accepted international treaties as the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities UNCRPD 2006.

Any rights-based approach that neglects disabled persons rights is inadequate.

2. International movements and campaigns rally large numbers of disabled people. Disabled persons make the largest minority group in the world

if government institutions who are the planners, implementers and evaluators ignore disabled interests and needs, and refrain from
engaging disabled persons as interlocutors, collaborators and allies.
They will never get it right!
3. Many development and human rights agencies are into education and campaigning – i.e., they attempt to spread ideas around, and to mobilise others to
join them in their cause. The messages they convey, implicitly or explicitly,
influence people’s minds: research has shown that campaigning can reinforce or weaken people’s value systems – broadly speaking, what they consider to
be “good” or “bad”, “right” or “wrong”. (See for example the gender mainstreaming angle.
Hence, it is important to avoid reinforcing values that condone discrimination and other violations against disabled persons
which would be in stark contradiction with the development and human rights goals most of us defend.
The disability organizations need to take lead in voicing what needs to be don on tax related concerns.
Disabled persons should not just be raising concerns on the social media but take the demands to the Kenya revenue authority.
The Kenya revenue authority need to work along side disabled persons in order to ensure smooth and faster process is achieved.
4. disability -based violence is not only one of the most pervasive human rights violations, it also jeopardises development. For example, large numbers of disabled persons have experienced delayed service delivery due to the bureaucratic processes. For instance, delayed in tax exemption renewal, with
dire consequences for their physical well-being, their mental health and their social status. Getting tax exemption is right, but y risk their
lives because of high cost of transport, psychological wellbeing. The Kenya revenue authority should know that most disabled persons are unemployed and for those who do not get access to the service
are likely to feel abused, something is deeply wrong.
Additionally, the Kenya economy is highly affected by wastage of hours on the road.
The tax exemption should have been simplified through decentralization of Kenya revenue authority services at the county.
In other words, if the digitalization process ways actualized the staff at Kenya revenue authority would be able to automatically issue exemption certificates without delay.
The disability mainstreaming focal point person at Kenya revenue has to actualize the dreams of disabled persons by ensuring the system works beyond himself or herself.
Are there government institutions, private sectors who have been given tax relief by the Kenya revenue authority for promoting disability employment and improving access for disabled persons in Kenya?
5. In terms of efficiency, any organisation has a responsibility to serve the disable persons who need their service.
Disabled persons should not be treated as second class citizen in government services.
Siting an example in 2019 May the Kenyan government in collaboration with world bank launched the braille version of the 2030 vision which in essence non blind persons read a decade ago. Is this fair?
The Kenyan policy makers need to stop the mancantile policy process and adapt solution-oriented policy and procedures.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Why the Disabled Kenyan man missed the Land comission job!

Disabled persons all over the world face surmountable challenges in accessing participation in all spheres of life.
Siting example of Kenya it has been a long struggle for advocacy of both individuals and institutions to recognize persons with disabilities.
Disabled persons are 15 per cent of the world’s population, that’s one billion people, and yet, they are significantly more unemployed and under-employed
As expected, the constitution of Kenya is clear on matters representation and appointments in the public and private sector.
As evidenced by Section 54(2) of the Kenya constitution 2010 requires the state to ensure that at least 5 % of the members of the public in elective
and appointive
bodies are persons with disabilities. The sustainable development goals (SDGs), to which Kenya is party, in target 8.5, the world hopes that by 2030 achieve
full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and
equal pay for work of equal value. Despite existing domestic and global legal frameworks, access to the labor market remains a daunting challenge for
persons with disabilities. This may be attributed to accessibility related challenges, inadequate quality education stigma and lack of a comprehensive
strategy to empower and absorb persons with disabilities into the job market.
Additionally, disabled persons have been underemployed, and employers have immensely refused to adapt reasonable accommodation measures which could have enhanced the productivity of individuals with disabilities.
On the other hand, People with disabilities represent a significant untapped source of talent for employers and a market segment for businesses that includes not only the
person with a disability but their family members and friends. Businesses and employers are recognizing that disability inclusion in the workplace represents
a competitive advantage that has been overlooked for too long.
ILO 2005 in one of its studies stated clearly that with proper accesses and provision of reasonable accommodation disabled persons can stay for long in a particular job than the non-disabled counterparts thus high productivity and prophitability of the organizations
This reduces even the expenses of hiring new staff and reduces staff turnover.

Moreover, the situation is further aggravated by lack of an elaborate and sustainable
social security mechanism for this historically marginalized group.
The big question is what it shall take for the Kenyan government to effectively address the problem of accessibility and provision of reasonable accommodation to the labor market for persons
with disabilities?
The Kenyan 2018 public service disability mainstreaming policy articulates clearly the measures which all public entities should follow in promoting the welfare of disabled persons and promoting reasonable accommodation.
If all government entities adapt this approach all disabled persons in Kenya will stop lamentation.
Of course, this is
is the only sure way of granting persons with disabilities a chance to live an independent, dignified and respectable life.
The jury is out there, disabled persons are still hoping to see which government agency is executing the provisions of the constitution, UNCRPD, public service policy etc.

Unfortunately, this has not been the case for the most appointments in the recent past of Kenyan story.
For instance, after the expiry of the first land commission,
It was expected a new team will be brought on board.
Unfortunately, the disabled person who made it to the finals was not nominated to serve on the commission.
This is to show how Kenya has not recognized the importance of having a disabled commissioner.
To put it differently, disabled persons have been denied the opportunity of voicing the voice of the largest minority group.
Its not that the disabled persons don’t have concerns on the land matter but it is clear that disabled are the most disadvantaged on land matters.
Disabled persons have lost land to family, relatives and friends, they are also disinherited by the relatives, land taken away without their consent etc.
Regrettably, no human rights body nor the disability movement advocated for the disabled person to be taken on board. Even after the gazettement of the current list no one came to voice the agenda. Where is the so-called disability caucus group?
Why did the chairperson of the gender commission who doubled as the task force chair didn’t voice this discrepancy?
Will the disabled individuals be locked out of the upcoming IEBC commission job?
The jeury is out there.

For a thriving and leadership someone could have taken responsibility of this Agenda. pick me up!
Disable persons organization and disabled persons and allies need to rise up and advocate for better appointments and representation.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

The Blocks to Disability Leadership and the mercantile economy of Kenya Author Mugambi Paul

Should disability leaders give up their work?

What world you do when you are in an office and all documents are inaccessible?
What would you do if you turned up for work and you had to climb a 3-meter brick wall to get into the office?
Ask the Nyeri law courts.
What about if everyone conducted team meetings
using PowerPoint and print materials?
How would you feel if you complained and nobody seemed to care?
The Kenyan public space has basically normalized this habit.
Yet, Kenya is the signatory and has domesticated the UNCRPD.
Kenya is known worldwide to have progressive laws and policies.
Imagine if we would have at list 10 % implementation of accessibility!
Let me give an example of the normalcy which occurs daily.

Some contemporaries of mine went to work the other day.

No big deal, hey. Lots of people go to work every day.

The difference is these colleagues are disability leaders. They are well respected in their various fields and regularly lead the public conversation about
disability. They are somehow not tough people I know, allot much gets in their way.
They mostly forget to bring the cows home by not demanding what’s is rightfully and constitutionally there’s.
!
This is to say, most of the public and private conferences in Kenya are held inaccessible areas.
Mostly, the disability leaders aren’t able to transact their work obligations as expected because the workshops and business areas are normally inaccessible. Very inaccessible. Should I say even the Kenyan parliament is among the list?
A place where the largest minority or marginalized group are supposed to find solace.
Should we continue with boardroom discussion on how to make accessibility real?
Or just continue with our social media rhetoric discussions?
Should we wait for another Kibaki moment to actualize the dreams of our heroes and heroines in the disability world?
Where is the accessibility voice space?
Who should be bringing the sector in to order?
The government and human rights bodies in Kenya “hamwoni hi ni dhuluma?” What I am
particularly annoyed by isn’t the inaccessibility, well actually that does annoy me, rather I’m very annoyed that a bunch of disability leaders have continued this trend to
work expecting to perform at their usual high standard, and they are unable to do so.

Most of them can’t live the venues or have alternative mode of communication.
That’s why in Kenya we are still talking in boardrooms about accessibility.
If one day the disability leaders walked out in protest of inaccessible venues and products it will be the turning point.
Through a social media survey, I actually noted that some disabled leaders aren’t involved by public and private entities into workshops.
They are normally left out and remain in offices.
There bosses tend to claim they are stubborn when they demand for reasonable accommodation.

How many local and international conferences have taken place in Kenya and accessibility becomes an afterthought?

This is a total distress and lack of engagement.
This affirms why disabled persons are not represented in most of the forums and become last to be remembered.

How is that the answer? Should disability leaders be giving up their work, or should conferences and workplaces be more committed to ensuring accessibility?

Newsflash: accessibility isn’t an extra or a nice thing to have, its mandatory if you want disabled people in the room. If you think diversity is of any
value at all then accessibility is part of your regular processes, it’s just how you operate. You budget for it, make it happen, build it in from the outset.
You choose venues that work, and make sure there are rapid responses to any issues that arise. You don’t argue and able plain and put the onus back onto
the disability leader to get less disabled, you take responsibility for making accessibility happen and you fix it quickly when it doesn’t.
which government building in Kenya is accessible for the disabled persons?
Most importantly, you make sure the people designing the access are those who know about access and have professional experience in accessibility.
This means they will also be disabled people. These access experts should be paid for their work, just like your sound technicians and caterers.
Obviously, lack of recognition of disabled experts has been normalized by the system, which we need to break.
and that makes it unusual. Most incidents of inaccessibility happen to individuals, often in workplaces that aren’t supportive or have managers who think
they know better, or they are single barriers affecting individuals at offices, seminars rather than everyone, so we never hear about them.
Mostly when organizers realize their mistake.
They normally result in a formal apology during the final plenary. Unfortunately, most of the disability leaders accept and move on.
Additionally, most apologies do not include a commitment to recruit disabled people onto the organising committee in the
future, nor did they include a reference to the same situation happening at the previous conference and this incident being a repeat.

There are still significant barriers to disability leadership.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.