“DISABILITY LENCE” The unspoken truth of the Kakamega school tragedy! Author Mugambi Paul

In the recent past more schools in Kenya are reporting deaths and newly disabled pupils in unclear circumstances. Yet we have lots of resources’ and commitments towards achieving sDG number 4 and meeting the Kenya 2030 vision.
Kakamega school is not the last in this zero-game played by lack of observation of accessibility standards.
Kenya has lots of different pieces of legislations which needs harmonization and have a clear state organ to lead in implementation.
In September 2019 a classroom crushed at Precious Talents Top School in Nairobi killing 8.
Up to now no one has been convicted nor a report produced.
How many more should die or get disabled?
I opine that Schools have become death traps for future leaders and different influencers.
The unspoken truth is that the lack of observation of built accessibility standards seems to be the major setback towards this issue.
How many more will die or get disabled so that policy makers will protect the innocent lives?
Schools are meant to be safe heaven away from the harsh times in Kenya.
I believe the different policy makers seem not to grasp what is ailing lots of buildings in the country.
Kenya seems to be mark timing on the root course of collapsing of buildings and stampede in build environment.
The voice of the disabled:
the disability sector in Kenya have maintained the traditional tune of wait and see who will blink first.
I observe that more persons have become disabled in search kind of disasters.
How are disabled persons included in disaster management?
How are the newly disabled persons included in the new club membership?
What are the support measures put in place to ensure the persons who have acquired disabilities have a smooth ride of inclusion?
According to different studies, it is moment like this when the disabled persons organizations and allies of the disability sector are needed to raise the voice of accessibility.
It would be prudent to see policy makers within and without the disability sector setting record stay straight on having national accessibility standards.
One of the commitments made by the Kenyan government is about inclusive education in July 2019.
Could the stakeholders in the disability sector stand up and make a statement?
Shall we continue to be left behind?
Disability media reporting:
This is one of the major gaps in the media industry.
The exact desegregated data of the newly disabled persons is not given nor reported.
Recommendation:
The national construction authority needs to conduct an accessibility audit of all schools.
This will aid the non-compliant schools to be shut down by the ministry of education.
The national construction authority has the capacity in resource mobilization and expertise in built environment.
Moreover, what they might need capacity on is technical support on conducting inclusive audits.
When will the ministry of education issue a decree on accessibility standards in school just like the way the Cabinet secretary ordered pregnant girls to be admitted in form one?
All in all, as a public policy scholar I believe disability mainstreaming will be achieved when all institutions take responsibility and not to wait for a policing unit to actualize inclusion.
When we make built environment accessible for all it benefits everyone not the disabled only.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

The cost of remaining mum on Kenyans living with disabilities and individuals with chronic illness Author Mugambi Paul

Research shows that most chronic illnesses can affect every single part of individuals life, but it doesn’t really look like it. Some chronic illnesses have constant pains and fatigue among individuals [WHO 2011].
On the other hand, I have engaged several individual in the social media platforms.
This has led me to learn several lessons
You might not know a person is suffering if you don’t communicate ]HI 2011].
I classify some of these individuals as having invisible disabilities.
This is to say invisible disabilities mean that often times,
people don’t believe that actually individuals can be sick. This leads to people saying common things that, despite usually having good intentions, can come off as rude,
dismissive, and ableist.

The one I’ve heard the most is something that has undoubtedly been said to every person with an invisible disability or illness – the dreaded ‘but you
don’t look disabled nor sick!’. This happens all too often as an offhand comment, but it’s also been followed by heartbreaking situations like eventually losing friends
who haven’t believed that chronic illness or having impairment was real because people don’t look or act sick in the way they think one should be?
So, to give you a bit of a crash course, here’s some examples of what NOT to say to people with chronic illness.

‘But you don’t look sick!’

Yep, I know – but I am. These five words reduce health down to appearance, which is not the case at all. You might be saying this with the best intentions
(hopefully shock, because someone look ~too stunning~ for someone who’s actually very ill) but what it actually does is hits on one of the biggest fears of chronically
ill people – that people don’t believe them.
Actually,
Personally, whenever someone says this, it just reminds me of the many times people haven’t believed I can’t see because I didn’t *look* Blind. You might mean it supportively,
but all I hear is doubt.
This is because am super in mobility and orientation especially in familiar territories.
Sometimes it’s an anxious moment for me when individuals with out disabilities just plainly discuss behind my back “look at him, he is just pretending, he is comfortable” not knowing I have to go an extra mile to orient myself, secondly he or she doesn’t know that I have to do it since I don’t have alternative.
Additionally, I note that Not all illnesses are visible.
I can guarantee you; every chronically ill person has tried absolutely everything they physically and financially can. I cannot think of one person who’s
simply said, ‘ah bugger, I’m chronically ill. I’m not going to bother trying things to feel better!’
Trust me, some have tried it all; all the doctors’ and specialists’ suggestions, and yes, a bunch of the tinfoil hat ones too (desperation and lack of medical
answers make for strange bedfellows).

Examples of suggestions of what my friends the blind community and other persons with disabilities have tried including: various supplements, Chinese herbs, marijuana, LSD, ketamine, essential
oils, drinking their own urine, crystals, B12 shots, spirulina, charcoal, detoxes and juice fasts, prayer and religion – the list goes on,
as a blind fellow you can guest which one of them, I have tried I’ll let you ponder on which).

And before you ask, yes
You have seen many disabled persons, the chronic ill persons going to work, or you saw a photo of one catching up with a friend on the weekend. That’s irrelevant to whether he or she look ‘okay’ to you now
He or she still remains ill, and he or she maintains his or her impairment since they do not disappear.
According to several studies they indicate the nature of chronic illness is, sadly, extremely can be unpredictable. One can have totally manageable levels of pain and fatigue one day, and barely able to
walk the next. Sometimes it’s because one accidentally overexerted himself and went over my limits, but sometimes symptoms flaring can be completely random.
If you find it annoying, just try to imagine how frustrating it is for individuals with chronic illnesses. Regardless, some have always sick and in pain – some days some are just able to manage
it (and hide it!) better than others.

‘You just need to snap out of it and push through.’

‘Pushing through’ actually makes someone, and many others with chronic pain and illness, worse.
In Kenya and other developing countries there is no particular policy framework addressing concerns of persons with chronic illnesses although a mention here and there on different framework.
Most families carry the burden of taking care of chronic ill individuals and this affects the economic and social wellbeing of the society at large. The resources used to trat could have been used for other functions [ILO 2017, undp 2016].
Its high time we have particular social protection measure to address persons who have chronic illnesses.
Moreover, one of the major experientials in the disability world and chronic illness which seems to be similar is the way the society expects us to push ourselves beyond our limits
Obviously its so great to push beyond limit but this doesn’t apply to all persons. What the society doesn’t understand persons with disabilities and individuals with chronic illnesses are not a homogenous group.
one is sick or disabled every single day, and know their body and their limits better than anyone – so telling one to ‘push through’ is actually
the worst possible advice. When you’re talking to someone with disability or a chronic illness, remember just because you’d be able to manage something, doesn’t mean
they can or should. Don’t assume someone’s health and limits for them. It totally removes their agency as a human being.
Besides having a disability some individuals might also be having chronic illnesses.
‘You’re too young to be sick!’ or sometimes for disabled persons they say woyee woyee how comes he is blind?

Yep! He or she is young! And sick or having a disability! It sucks. But sickness and chronic illness isn’t exclusively the domain of the elderly; people of all ages can get sick. The society needs to understand that Doesn’t
make their experiences less valid, or their identities abnormal. They just sick in a cool young person way, I guess. I don’t know – it’s a weird thing to
say, so just don’t.

‘If you stopped talking about it all the time and looked on the bright side, you’d feel better.’

I do! To be totally frank, as a blind fellow if I didn’t look on the optimistic side, I wouldn’t be alive right now. Being blind for 23 years now it’s not a walk in the park.
It takes strong will to be in this unjust society.
This also applies to other fellow disabled persons.
Needless to say,
Being chronically ill is also tough as hell, and many chronic
illnesses have strong ties to mental illness. One has to look on the bright side A LOT, otherwise their depression and just the daily battle of being sick
would drag one down and some can’t be able to get out of their beds.

All in all, people should be able to talk about their lived experience as much as they deem appropriate, and disability and chronic illness is not spoken about
enough. Let them vent, let us explain, let them talk about their day!

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Untold success story of the Cash transfer programme in Kenya Author Mugambi Paul

Rising inequality isn’t a new concern. Many countries in the global are facing this phenomenon.
Oliver Stone’s movie “Wall Street,”
with its portrayal of a rising plutocracy insisting that greed is good, was released in 1987. But politicians, intimidated by cries of “class warfare,”
have shied away from making a major issue out of the ever-growing gap between the rich and the rest.
The best argument for putting inequality on the back burner is the depressed state of the economy. Isn’t it
more important
to restore economic growth than to worry about how the gains from growth are distributed?
I will look at the social protection aspects in Kenya and how it has contributed to changing the lives of most vulnerable persons in the society.
Secondly, I will strive to highlight the misgivings of the global commitments.
To begin, the 2019 to 2020 Kenyan Budget raised the issue of implementing a Single Registry for all social protection programmes. This will improve the coordination of social
protection programmes, which have been highly fragmented leading to numerous inefficiencies. According to the social assistance project the ministry of labour and social services will highly improve the outcomes of the social protection programme by having the 3 cash transfer programmes in one registry. This is a great move which will reduce the flows experienced in the systems.
However, the Registry should not only create a data base of
beneficiaries from all programmes but should also track beneficiaries until they are able to graduate. As a public scholar I recommend the Ministry of labour and social services and its partners should develop A strategy for non-labour
constrained households who have the potential to graduate to entrepreneurship and gainful employment. This will help in eliminating increased dependency
on social safety nets.
Secondly, the government of Kenya has scaled up the uptake of the universal health cover though not much has been discussed on the inclusivity of disabled persons to this well intended programme.
However, Today, the risk of childbearing related deaths has become rare among Kenyans mothers. Infant deaths have also declined significantly, while more children
can now live beyond their fifth birthdays than before. Although non-communicable diseases are emerging and threatening the health of many people, the health
system has grown stronger and more resilient to be able to eliminate this threat. The county and national government need to enhance the human resource capacity in the health sector and reduce the cost of health by also adapting a single registry in both public and private hospitals which all the medics can access under privacy laws of the clients with out incurring extra charges as in the current situation. another aspect of promoting well being of citizens is the availability of water supply.
Scaling up urban projects to improve water and sanitation
The state of water and sanitation in Kenya is worryingly poor. Urban areas are prone to water borne diseases that break out almost every year. Recently,
Kenya experienced a Cholera outbreak that claimed more than 56 people, with the majority being Zin Nairobi.
is December 2019 Kirinyaga county is adding to the statistics.
Accordingly, the allocation to water and sanitation in the 2019 budget allocation was increased. in 2019. This is the highest level in five years, and though the nation has fiscal limitations, the allocation is justifiable to address water issues and
prevent disease outbreaks in the country. Despite the usual concerns on disbursements from the national treasury to the counties, the 2019 budget shows improvements, as 45% of the approved budget
was disbursed as of October 2019, compared to 2018 financial year. With such improvements, Kenya will be able to address its water and sanitation
problems in 2020.
On the other hand, the floods experienced in Kenya in November 2019 could have saved Kenyan millions of shillings if the ministry of water and irrigation had proper mechanism of conserving the rainwater.
Instead of the havoc caused and 152 lives lost we would have seen more water reservoirs being put in place.
The more challenging factor on this is that a dry spell will be kicking off and more request for food donation will take place as evidenced by the support by United states of America
https://www.nation.co.ke/news/Kenya-receives-Sh340m-food-aid-from-US/1056-5396952-egea2j/index.html

additionally, Social protection programmes have led to Kenyan households being able to afford more than one meal a day, achieve more diet diversity, afford more shoes
and clothes for their children, attain some level of education, and empower small scale farmers. However, recently there have been concerns among stakeholders
regarding the administration of these programmes, which the Government should aim to adequately address. These efforts should help reinstate donor confidence
in the administration of these programmes.
All in all, the government of Kenya has highly enhanced the development of well-crafted legal frameworks which now need to be executed for the benefit of the most marginalized and vulnerable members of our society.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

2 disability experts paints a grim picture on the BBI report “why the disabled Kenyans always fall into cracks” Authors: DR Siyat Abdi and Mugambi Paul.

According to the World Bank, WHO and the United Nations One billion people, or 15% o

f the world’s population, experience some form of disability.
Persons with disabilities, on average as a group, are more likely to experience adverse socioeconomic outcomes than persons without disabilities. Such as less education, poorer health outcomes, lower levels of employment, and higher poverty rates.

Barriers to full social and economic inclusion of Kenyans with disabilities include inaccessible communication, navigating the physical environments, inaccessible transportation, the unavailability of assistive devices and technologies, non-adapted means of communication, gaps in service delivery, utter unemployment inequality and generally discriminatory prejudice and stigma in Kenyan society.

From our professional lenses and in-depth analysis, we observe that the voice of this largest minority was never hard on the BBI 156-page report.
Notwithstanding, understanding the influence of different stakeholders in public policy making is very Critical “Carolyne 2016].
Although the BBI Taskforce had lots of public network in executing some of the insisted public approaches [Carolyne 2017], the task force did a total disservice and provided just a window dressing of Kenyans with disabilities.

In our collective opinion, the first omission and a major setback was the lack of representation of persons with disability in the BBI task force for persons living with disabilities.
This affirms the incessant notion of the government of Kenya of not ensuring article 54 of the 2010 Kenyan Constitution is realized.
Our expectations were high, and therefore, we expected the Taskforce would provide a clear direction on accessible representation that responds to the needs of persons with disability.

Secondly, on behalf of all Kenyans with disabilities who are the largest minority, we affirm the term “Disability” appeared 9 times in the BBI Report.
This was not in reference to any commitments to the 9-point agenda in their Terms of Reference but giving basic information of the experiential circumstances people with disability find themselves in Kenya.
In other words, the task force deliberated on the historical background on issues regarding persons living with disabilities without offering any commitment on how the nation will address the historical and traditional social injustices encountered by person with disabilities in Kenya.
Instead, the Taskforce echoed the common cliché we are used to by outlining traditional principles which clinically failed to work in the past.
No doubt, the BBI task force affirms what Paul Mugambi said in one of his articles, emphasising why the disability movement in Kenya must change tact once and for all!
http://www.mugambipaul.com/2019/11/17/why-the-disability-movement-in-kenya-should-stop-crying-faw/.
Increasing inclusivity on a political, economic, social, religious, cultural, youth, and gender basis is not Inclusivity devoid of disability.
How long are we going to continue being marginalised both in the national government and in the Counties?

It is worth noting the reflective theoretical commitment of Kenya to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development goals.
It affirms clearly that disability cannot be a reason or criteria for lack of access to development programming and the realization of human rights.
Additionally, the SDGS framework have already been integrated in both short- and long-term Kenyan plan strategies, but limited wheels of implementations are in actions.
Its significant, to pronounce that the SDG framework has seven targets, which explicitly refer to persons with disabilities, and six further targets on persons in vulnerable situations, which again include persons with disabilities.
The SDGs address essential development domains such as education, employment and decent work, social protection, resilience to and mitigation of disasters, sanitation, transport, and non-discrimination – all of which are important obligations for the Kenyan government.

Unfortunately, the BBI task force team clearly seem to have been communicating to persons with disabilities in the charity model.
This is to mean the expressions reference to persons living with disabilities seem to be a separate group from Kenyans and this shows that there was exclusion in addressing persons with disabilities in the BBI report.
Thirdly, the term inclusion appeared 24 times.
The only relevant was the 22nd mention.
The cruel irony is that Article 174(e) of the Constitution provides that one of the objectives of devolution in Kenya is ‘to protect and promote the interests and rights of minorities and underserved or discriminated-against communities.’
It is for this reason that the Taskforce strongly feels that measures leading to greater inclusion, equality, equity, and basic fairness at the National level should be mirrored in the Counties, both in law, policy and administration.”
Do you think people with disability will enjoy this commitment?

Fourthly, the term Physical access has been mentioned twice and the 2nd one is relevant to persons with disabilities.
Increase physical access for people with disabilities into buildings, particularly public ones, and transport.
This shows the limitation of the BBI report since it’s not just enough to talk of physical access of built environment and transport only.
Kenyans living with disabilities still need more in area of universal and accessible housing, employment opportunity, and access to building (public and social facilities), communication and access to adaptive technology among many other disability services.
Fifthly, the term “has access” has been mentioned 42 times in the report.
The only relevant area is the 2nd mention. “
The aim should be for all Kenyans to have to cover the same distances to access public services.”
The access to information seems to be one of the major recommendations for the BBI task force but they avoided to demand for alternative accessible formats which could have ensured those with vision loss (blind), those with cognitive disability and other print disabled access information.
The BBI task force would have well utilized the Marrakesh treaty as a benchmark on access to information with excellent literature support from the United Nation Convention for the Rights of Persons with Disability (UNCRPD).

The BBI report missed opportunities to present across several mechanisms on enhancement of rights of people with disability in Kenya:
For instance, we anticipated that they would have an opportunity to present a structured Social protection systems that would be barrier-free and inclusive, and in a manner which ensures that everyone has equal opportunities to access social protection schemes, which may require special measures for particular categories of the population who may face additional barriers, such as persons with disability and the elderly Kenyans.
They missed to articulate the structure and design implementation of social protection, taking into account Human rights principles and standards at every stage of the schemes in the context of the level of marginalisation experiences of persons with disability both in the national government and in the Counties.
We welcome the Taskforce proposal to change the County Executive, including, but not limited to, the running mate of every candidate for the position of Governor.
While it is commendable to suggest consideration of the opposite gender, window of opportunity should have been given for any governor to decide their running mate, and if possible opportunity to make informed decision to pick a person with a disability as a Deputy Governor.
Another missed opportunity was to empower the National council for People with Disability NCPWD to be elevated a disability commission instead of a semiautonomous body incapable of servicing people with disability.
This could be either through a referendum or by legislation which could have subsequently ensured that the disability commission is well resourced and has the capacity to provide appropriate disability services based on social model and ensure the realization of disability rights.

On a positive note, the beauty of the BBI report is the importance of public participation and engagements. We hope people with disability will be fully engaged in decisions that matter to them.

In conclusion, the BBI report seem to have nailed the coffin for persons with disabilities by claiming that people with disabilities in Kenya are bunch of winchers, always complaining of injustices.
It seems the task force doesn’t understand that people with disabilities in Kenya are tired of the prolonged injustices experienced.
Yes, we must complain and continuously complain because we don’t expect civil and political elections of representatives in Party primaries and nominations to be fair; free and transparent elections in the context of persons with disability.
We must raise our voice because we are severely marginalised both in the national government and in the Counties in terms of employment and social services.
We cannot be satisfied with the BBI solution of just using reputable private recruitment companies to help, but to put in place recruitment legislations that give Kenyan people with disability opportunity to exercise their skills and talents to maintain their livelihood.
What the Kenyan people with disabilities need is real tangible implementation of legal and policy frameworks and ensuring persons living with disabilities actually access all government and private services just like any other Kenyan.

The views expressed here are for the authors and do not represent any agency or organization.

DR Siyat Abdi
Is a independent disability consultant.
Mugambi Paul is a
Public policy diversity and inclusion expert.

Public participation event

address to the public on importance of engaging disabled persons

Why the Kenyan census 2019 remains a mystery to the many poor and disabled Kenyans! Author Mugambi M. Paul

Over 1 billion people globally, including 494 million in Sub-Saharan Africa (roughly 45% of the population), lack government-recognized proof of identification [UN 2017.] This hampers their access to critical financial and social services and raises barriers to exercising political and economic rights. Obviously, several studies have shown that lack of desegregated
data among the disabled persons has greatly impacted negatively towards lives of the disabled community [world bank 2011].
According to [KBS 2009] Kenyans with disabilities make up 3.8 %.
However, these statistics are debatable and disabled persons organizations have argued that proper mechanisms were not in place.
Will the 2019 August census in Kenya be different?
The answer lies on the shoulders of the Kenya neural of statistics.
They have been able to adapt the Washington set of questions, but this will be put in to test during the data collections.
However, in the development of the censor’s committees still disabled persons organizations nor the county disability officers are not represented.
This is a great setback of ensuring inclusivity and raising the voice of persons with disabilities.
The policy makers need to adopt measures urgently at the ministry of interior to ensure disability representatives are added. This should not just be for quantity but provide quality and real representation in public participation.
Additionally, the county governments need to be keen on what the data of persons with disabilities mean in matters of service delivery and enhancement of proper support for persons with disabilities ]2010 Kenyan constitution]. It’s prudent to mention that the county governments are the service providers in their own counties.
persons with disabilities and thee organizations need to knock on the county government to ensure that the census collected becomes meanful in service delivery and planning.
At list a third of the counties have enacted county disability laws but are yet to implement.
I take note that Persons with disabilities face several challenges in receiving identification documents and presenting these documents to access services.
There is no exact information to show how many disabled persons have received particular government or private sector services.
What is emerging clearly as a public policy scholar I uphold Kenya should adapt to data driven analysis.
is in order to fight poverty.
Thus having need evidence-based thinking and plenty of good data.
The Kenyan census should be huge part of this phenomenon. Although it can be easy to overlook, it’s actually incredibly important because this data will inform the Kenyan government decisions that will shape millions of lives.
Recognizing this, I believe Kenya has a chance of its new census data to be more accurate, comprehensive, and granular than in the past. Will the Kenya beural of statistics switch to digital tablets? Will the Kenya bural of statistics use satellite imagery to make sure households in rural areas don’t go undiscovered and uncounted? The jury is out there.
I look forward for a disability desegregated data at the county levels.

I trust The government is now seriously committed to a “leave no one behind” ethic, which means counting every single person in the population. That includes people who are sometimes called “the invisible” — those who live in slums, disabled persons , who are homeless, or who are institutionalized.

These people are harder to reach, but without counting them and identifying which places they’re concentrated in and which services they lack, it’s difficult to design targeted interventions that will actually help them. Kenya and other African countries are increasingly treating this kind of data-driven approach as crucial to their development.
The Kenya bural of statistics must adapt many new ways which Kenya is leveraging data. That includes a biometric national ID system the so called Hudumanumber. (more than 30 million Kenyans have registered for it so far.
I suggest that Kenya adapts a digital address system (whereby every five square meters in the country will have its own unique address).
This way government can target services to people, once you know where they are.
How do you count “the invisible”?

Kenya’s census will take place in August 2019 for 3 days not a lot of time to survey a population of approximately 50 million people. But I believe the preparations begun well in advance, and this time, they will include a lot of help from new technology.

For the first time, will the enumerators use digital tablets to survey the population?I opine that through this they will be able to have answers to be checked for inconsistencies or omissions in real time. Will the Kenyan bural of statistics use Electronic maps?
This will help enumerators make sure they’re counting everyone in their demarcated area. GPS will pinpoint and record the exact location where each interview will be conducted.

Meanwhile, will the Kenyand government officials use satellite imagery to identify all housing structures in the country?
I affirm that if the enumerators go out into the field, an image showing which locations they’ve covered will be overlaid on top of the satellite imagery.
This will allow the officials to determine which areas may have been missed.

Usually it’s in rural areas, enumerators may not have known people are living there.
The Hudumanamba enrollment should be a wake-up call before the census begins.
Most developed and developing nations are increasingly looking to leapfrog challenges with traditional ID systems by moving to digital identification systems through the use of new technologies. Kenyan government has not been left behind since it’s a leader in digital Enovation in Africa.
The Kenyan government has introduced Hudumanamba system for its all citizens and the diaspora populations.
Digital identification systems are attractive to governments due to potential benefits of universal coverage and unique authentication. Were persons with disabilities, organizations for persons with disabilities consulted on the process?
It seems the government of Kenya denied its citizens the public participation
And say on this agenda. This has led to a court case making it voluntary to register for Hudumanamba.
On the other hand, Kenyans who need services might find themselves at catch 22 when the hudumanamba services will be rolled out.

Digital identification systems use a range of technologies include biometrics scanners, facial recognition, artificial intelligence, and other emerging mobile technologies.
The rapid moves towards digital identification systems raises both opportunities and challenges in ensuring that persons with disabilities can register for, receive, and use their unique identification. Will the disabled persons stop using the disabled cards?
Will the registration of newly disabled persons be conducted after the Huduanamba registration?
What’s the link between the registration for disabled persons and the hudumanamba roll out?
It seems the Kenyan government still stand accused of enhancing bureaucracy towards achievement of vital services to persons with disabilities with this unlinked processes and procedures.

Hudumanamba card is speculated it will offer alternative mechanisms to ensure that the lack of breeder documents (e.g. birth certificates) do not hamper individuals’ abilities to receive important credentials and open pathways to receiving economic and social services. At the same time, they need to be carefully designed to ensure accessibility and inclusion. Some of the Problems that emerged during the Hudumanamba registration included when persons with disabilities were unable to provide biometric data. e.g. due to lack of an iris or fingerprints), algorithms did not recognize certain facial features, or most hudumanamba centers fail to provide accessible accommodations and exceptions.
For instance, lack of alternative formats for the information, which was being gathered to the Blind, vision impaired, intellectual impaired and the Deafblind,
Another example is the inaccessible venues for the hudumanamba registration.
This was also coupled by Lack of staff training, and awareness of disability issues.
Furthermore, many disabled persons allegedly reported mistreatment during the process.
Thus, having significant challenges in the process of registration.
Will the Kenya bural l of statistics take lessons for the upcoming census?
The jury is outside!
All in all, the globe is embracing the digitalization of government services.
Disabled persons are not to be left behind.
Solution is to ensure we have inclusive policy and regulations
Thus, enabling the policy implementation to cater for the needs and priorities of disabled persons.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

“Open letter to the Newly NCPWD chair” Mugambi Paul

“Open letter to the NCPWD chair”
Mugambi Paul

This letter is sent to our newly Chair of the NCpwd:
Dear sir,
Kenyan persons with disabilities
want the same opportunities as everyone else in the community – somewhere to work, somewhere to live, somewhere to enjoy the company
of family and friends, the chance to follow their passions and interests. We want NCPWD that makes these things possible – not stands in their way.

Using the ideas that have been collected for the last 15 years.
I have come up with the three C’s: three useful targets to help get the NCPWD
back on track. 1. Control

Kenyan persons with disabilities must be in the driver’s seat. It is their experience and their views that must determine priorities and drive change. Choice and
control must not be undermined or restricted by poor policies and processes.
For instance, it should no longer be business as usual for the Blind and vision impaired persons to receive brailed version of vision 2030 after a decade when it was out.

No disabled representative is at the building bridge initiative! Persons with disabilities must be empowered by their experience in the NCPWD, not further disempowered
and marginalised. And above all we want good outcomes for everyone –not just those who are educated, or well-resourced or who have an advocate.

So how do we make this happen?
list of 5 items
• Quicker, simpler and easier processes. Simple and plain communication that is easy to understand, more so for persons with developmental disabilities and Deafblind etc

• More help for people, families and carers at every stage of the process including application for assistance, peer support and advocacy

• Fully functioning and fit for purpose IT system that works for both consumers and producers of disability services at the county and national levels.
participants and providers

• Focused and resourced attention on groups who need more support – such as those with complex needs, severe disabled persons, Blind and those who have never been hard.

• More staff to clear backlogs. And competent well-trained staff with the right experience and expertise
Additionally, a 51 per cent disability employment target across all levels of the NCPWD including senior leadership. Currently
just 25 per cent of the NCPWD workforce have a disability.
Furthermore, on the public service I believe more needs to be done to stop the disability community
being shut out of public sector jobs
.
The 5 % has the target did not go far enough, given the consistent decline of employees with disability
in the sector.
According to public service survey 2015 Kenya has not yet achieved even 1 % target of employment opportunities to persons with disabilities.
I opine that targets needed to be supported by a comprehensive strategy to address the “unacceptably low” employment rates of people with disability
across the APS and in mainstream employment more generally.
A Kenyan National Jobs Plan to fix systemic problems that people with disability face finding and keeping a job.

This plan would include measures to strengthen the transition of young people with disability from school into tertiary education and mainstream jobs,
and would integrate with the social security system to support people with episodic disability moving in and out of employment.
Moreover, a whole-of-government and whole-of-community approach is needed to enable employers to create meaningful, flexible and inclusive employment, make workplaces
more accessible, remove discrimination and build positive employer and community attitudes.

2. Certainty

Persons with disabilities, their families and carers want to know the NCPWD will be there for them when they need it. Those who have made applications want to know
services will be there when and how they need them. And for those who do not have an assistances, other programs and services must continue. No one should be left
without support because Kenyan government can’t get it together.
Instructively, Kenya has been on top from the global disability forums that no one should be left behind.
So how do we make this happen?
list of 5 items
• Full funding should be enshrined in the upcoming national and county budgets and persons with disabilities 2019 bill

• Active support and intervention to make sure people have a diverse range of quality services to choose from. Intervene early to prevent failure and lock
in crisis support so no-one falls through the cracks

• Independently let NCPWD become policy formulator and a facilitator instead of an implementor.
For instance, immediate action on the way NCPWD works with other systems like health, justice and transport. All levels of government must sit down and work out how to synchronize services instead of making disabled persons to suffer.

• Greater develop and resource of the Information, Linkages and Capacity Building program. This will ensure NCPWD funds the disability persons organization to further efforts of advocacy instead of fighting each other.

• New timeframes for entry into the NCPWD, plant and equipment approvals and plan reviews;

• More help for people to navigate the NCPWD and get their assistance plans into action including more support for advocacy; and

• Targeted outreach for people who require additional support such as children, people who are Blind, psychosocial support and or Culturally or
Diverse backgrounds.
list end
but also initiate or restoration of other programs and services
that support people with disability, their families and carers
list end this should be reflected in the county and national levels.

3. Community

The NCPWD was never intended to work in isolation. The gap in life outcomes between those with a disability and those without will never close without action
in all areas of life – employment, health, education and transport are all areas that need immediate action.

So how do we make this happen?
list of 3 items
• Greater attention and resourcing to the Kenyan National Disability Strategy

• Immediate action on employment, education, housing, transport and health. Targets must be set – and met.
More so the big four agenda.

• An immediate timeline for a board of trusty’s actions in issuance of
funding

I observe that All across the country persons with disabilities
, their families and carers and people who work in the sector have been holding formal and informal forums in the social media, mainstream media and public forums. events and coming together to demand
urgent change.
Obviously, many policy makers know what’s need to be fixed but they aren’t doing so.
As the chair you need to listen to us. After all, people with disability and their families know what is and what is not working when it comes to the NCPWD –
and we know how best to fix it.
Scholars and researchers have recommended
The disability persons organizations should join together with a government and work collaboratively so we can get the ncpwd working well for everyone who needs it.
This is very true in many countries.
NCPW is a body mandated to promote and protect equalization of opportunities and realization of human rights for disabled persons in Kenya to live dignified live.
as a public policy scholar, I affirm that and There is no question that when the NCPWD works it absolutely changes lives. We see its life-changing power every day. But, for too many people, the NCPWD
is not working well. It is too complex and too bureaucratic – and as a result some people are falling through the cracks while others are missing out altogether,
we know of some truly heartbreaking stories of people who are really being let down by the NCPWD. There are people with disability waiting two years
for a wheelchair, there are persons with disabilities waiting for the disability card for 7 months, there are blind persons awaiting a braille display but told to have a white cane etc
There are families pushed to breaking point without essential support for their child. There are people hospitalised as a direct result
of the stress of trying to work their way through a bureaucratic nightmare.

“Situations such as these cannot be allowed to continue. That is why, today I have written this letter. calling on the new chair to
listen to persons with disability and commit to getting the NCPWD working the way it should – the way it is mandated in respect to the UNCRPD, SDG and the Kenyan constitution.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.