The missing 11 opportunities in 2020 for disabled Kenyans Author Mugambi Paul

Background:

Tribalism and Gender come up frequently in both social media and mainstream media discussions in Kenya.

But what about disability?
It’s a known fact that The largest minority group in Kenya constitute about 7 million.
but despite that huge number, many disabled people face challenges reaching their full potential in social, economic, cultural and political spheres.
How do we break the chains?
as a public policy scholar and being blind I would like to author the missed opportunity of the Kenyan disability movement.
This is to say I highly understand the barriers that disabled Kenyans face in sea, land and air.
This is coupled with inadequate policy and legislation execution.
I opine that three quarters of the disabled Kenyans are poor, and this is catastrophic
This problem cannot be address with the normalcy which is currently perpetuated by the current disability movement
We have to adapt new way of thinking and be ready to make the systems work for persons with disabilities.
Miss opportunities:

1. The treasury normally conducts public budget engagement every year both at national and county levels: the disability movement could have presented their own version of budget which could have been adopted by the budget committee.
2. BBI committee: the disability movement could have advocated for representation in the BBI task force team.
3. Housing agenda: the Kenyan disability movement could have demanded 15 % of the new housing schemes should be fully accessible.
4. Opportunity at the national employment authority: the Kenyan disability movement could have demanded a robust plan and execution of disability employment services targeting disabled persons.
5. Accessible toilets: the Kenyan disability movement could have emphasized at list enforcement of usage of accessible toilets in most government and private entities instead of the toilets being used us storage facilities.
6. Accessible bank notes: the Kenyan disability could have demanded the central bank to issue accessible bank notes instead of allowing the president to cheat the Blind persons like me as evidenced in June 1st, 2018.
7.
Organizational culture: the Kenyan disability movement should mirror itself and see if it’s being an enabler of inclusion or it’s a talk show entity.
This is to say Beyond just bringing diverse disabled people together, persistent initiatives, specific behaviours, and intentional practices that support inclusion are needed for tapping and invigorating the potential of diversity and for leading to disability inclusive organisational cultures.
Thus, having proper leadership commitment, accountability, and contextualization.
8. utilization of online and live streaming services during workshops and conferences: at this era of digitalization and the faster collection of both true and fake news the Kenyan disability movement could have had robust plans of ensuring combining the old way of board room meetings with technology in order to collect diverse views and opinions.
9. Identity registration: the Kenyan disability movement could collaborate with the interior ministry of the super CS Mating’I and ensure the disabled get the disabled card much faster just like the planned Identity card and passport issuance.
10. Bodaboda transport: 80 percent of disabled Kenyans are mostly likely to use bodaboda for accessing public places but the Knyan disability movement went mum as the interior ministry developed regulations. Obviously the bodaboda reforms will have adverse effects on the wanjikus with disabilities.
11. Secondary school transition: the Kenyan disability movement could have joined the ministry of education and campaigned for grater transition of learners with disabilities. Moreover, the disability movement could have pushed for the ministry to fund all student with disabilities joining form one.
Could the 4.811 students be learners with disabilities?
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

The dream of saving the disabled Kenyans Author Mugambi Paul.

We’ve come a long way, with disabled Kenyans having more opportunity than ever, but there’s still a long way to go.
Since 1992, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD) has been annually observed on 3 December around the world. The theme for this 2019
IDPD is ‘
Promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership: taking action on the 2030 Development Agenda’. The theme focuses on the
empowerment of persons with disabilities for inclusive, equitable and sustainable development as envisaged in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,
which pledges to ‘leave no one behind’ and recognizes disability as a cross-cutting issues, to be considered in the implementation of its 17 Sustainable
Development Goals.

My hope is that Kenya will reach a point where basic education about acceptance and inclusion is no longer imperative.

I hope we’ll reach a point where it’s commonly understood that people with disability have the same rights to independence, employment, respect and access
to facilities as everyone else.
And I believe finding jobs for the thousands of Kenyans with disability who dearly want work is an essential part of getting there.
As a public policy scholar, I observe, it’s difficult for a blind person to land a job, even with stellar qualifications. A blind person with an associate degree is statistically less likely
to be employed than a sighted high school dropout.

Often, employers who don’t have experience working with disabled persons can’t conceptualize
how a disabled candidate can perform the job’s duties.
It makes matters worse employers who have experienced working with disabled persons are the barriers of enabling the Kenyan disabled to be employed.
As Helen Keller once said, “The chief handicap of the blind is not blindness, but the attitude of
seeing people toward them.”
These ungrounded fears contribute to the persistently low employment rates for disabled people.
Statistically as research shows at list in a population of 10 disabled Kenyans 8 are not employed.

To shift attitudes and make a difference — more people with disability need to be supported in the workplace.
I opine that most employers do not know that disabled people aren’t in the workforce, meaning employers are missing out on the benefits of hiring people with disabilities, including improvements in profitability,
competitive advantage and innovation.

Moreover, I grew up in a rural set up. where my community never bought into who I was — and made my world not as accessible as they possibly could. I had a great struggle to accomplish my educational journey,
where I faced discrimination and not treated as a peer. I believe right now,
There are many people with disability hoping to engage in work and the community more broadly and receive the opportunities that I was given so naturally.

They deserve the opportunity to be employed and fulfil their potential as much as anyone else in the African community.

I know what I most want to achieve as I celebrated my 22nd Birthday of being Blind.
Secondly my dream is
What I most want is for the community to use IDPwD as a launching pad for further action.

At this year’s celebration I hope governments, individuals and organizations will take the opportunity to commit to one concrete action towards removing barriers to accessibility
and inclusion for disabled Kenyans.
This is not too much to ask!
Get your workplace to give a person with disability a job.

Look for ways you can make your organisation, building or website more accessible for people with disability.

Create a paid internship program to help people with a disability get the skills they need to find a permanent job.

Provide anti-discrimination and bullying training to your staff — particularly those in customer facing roles.

If I can convince one person to roll up their sleeves and create a job for a person with disability or improve accessibility and inclusion within the community
— I’ll be satisfied with my contribution as a public scholar and expert in diversity and inclusion.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.