My third eye on Kenya’s disability movement

It has been argued from different quarters that the attitude of entitlement without responsibility has contributed to apathy among persons with Disabilities.
Kenyan persons with Disabilities should be encouraged to become proactive in ensuring good governance practices and use their creativity to ensure that they find their rightful
space in policy and decision making.
Failure to do this will mean that they have accepted to continually be marginalised.
Accountability is critical in ensuring that political leaders and all duty bearers honour their commitments and shows how different programme actions and
investment of public funds translate into tangible results and long-term outcomes that directly benefit persons with Disabilities . Accountability mechanisms should allow for grievances to be voiced and remedies provided and, as a responsive function, should help to improve how policy
or service delivery can be adjusted to make it more effective.
Efforts should be made to build capacity for persons with Disabilities to claim their rights and engage as active citizens.

An effective accountability mechanism is one that has the ability to transparently show the linkages between national and county levels with strong feedback
information loops.

This accurate and timely information has the potential to help in supporting national and county recommendations, actions and approaches aimed at reaching
the goals that support persons with Disabilities meet their aspirations and live a prosperous life.

Working with persons with Disabilities , especially in complex processes like planning, budgeting and monitoring, is crucial if development policies are to be truly
relevant to those they are meant to serve.
Sometimes participation and collaboration becomes difficult when review processes are complex and hard to interpret.

Persons with Disabilities should demand leaders to provide information in alternative format that is interactive and language that they can understand. All this is enshrined in Kenyan constitution and the UNCRPD.

An environment in which feedback is shared should also be considered.

If possible it should be easy to access without necessarily incurring costs.

Political leaders can only be said to be accountable if they listen and respond to the needs of persons with Disabilities people in a clear manner, explain action taken to
rectify whatever recommendations made and a guarantee that it will not be repeated.

This can be through actions like legislative reforms, innovative planning processes and prioritised funds allocation.

In conclusion, non-discriminative feedback mechanisms and effective follow-up processes is a means of verifying that an effective accountability mechanism
is in place.
The Constitution of Kenya has already defined duties, responsibilities and rights, so what is critical is to create strong linkage and integration both
at national and county levels because decisions are made through a network of actors.
For instance in the recently held general elections the Disability community was duped by the independent electro commissionin many ways.
There were no braille ballots at all. To make matters worse 17 counties left out the nominees with disabilities and for the 30 counties that had still had anomalies. Its still gloomy for women with disabilities as history has shown us they are often left out by women with out disabilities as they champion the women agenda and more sore the 2 third gender rule.
Never the less its important to note at the high level UNCRPD forum in August 2015 Kenya nation proclaimed that they provide free legal service when the rights of persons with disabilities have been ignored plus they provided accessible ballot in 2013.
We are yet to see the steps in which the state law office takes this matter in to consideration.
The litmus test that Kenyan persons with Disabilities should use is whether political leaders have put accountability mechanisms and pathways in place that are inclusive,
accessible, collaborative and responsive clearly showing how they will be structured and work in practice.

NB The views expressed here do not represent any agency or organization they are based on 17 years experience as a disability practitioner and human rights defender.

Appeal for Employment for PWDs at all County Levels

Leaders of devolved units and county assemblies should embrace disability inclusion by becoming role models in labour practices by ensuring that persons with different disabilities get share of the county cake distribution at all key positions in both the county assembly and executive levels.

I do heare by affirm that, as major employers and service providers, county governments have a constitutional mandate of article 54, UNCRPD article 27 moral authority and also significant impact on the lives of persons with disabilities.

This is by using fair employment practices and ensuring non-discriminatory service provision to locals and ensuring access to services. County governance is going to be the major driver of Kenya’s political and economic development, considering that crucial sectors of the economy and social/public services are under their jurisdiction.

I affirm the public service commission observations made in its study report of 2014 that persons with disabilities were left out by the national and county governments. With this not withstanding, all this levels of government never met the minimum constitutional threshold of 5 % opportunities but a mere below 1 % was what has been achieved.

since the introduction of devolution in 2013 greater participation, accountability and transparency in local governance and economic

development has been observed though allot needs to be done especially in provision of opportunities to persons with disabilities.

Devolution has provided a platform and an empowering voice to the historically marginalised population in the country.

The Kenyan Constitution envisions, among others, inclusiveness and protection of the marginalised as part of our national values and principles of governance.

International labor organization indicate in its different publications that political participation, especially by persons with disabilities, may lead to qualitative and substantive changes in governance, change of attitudes contributing to creation
of an environment that is more sensitive and responsive to people’s needs. For instance workers with disabilities are prone to work extra hard and ensure they meet targets.

Recently, the United disabled persons of Kenya the umbrella advocacy body for persons with disabilities, said the country has a long way to go to achieve disability mainstreaming in political representation following
the outcome of the August 8 2017 elections. Only 7 persons with disabilities were elected. two have been elected MP, two MCAs and one woman representative.
Earlier in the year, the National Gender and Equality Commission released a report on the status of equality and inclusion. It stated that persons with
disability have been discriminated against in the electoral processes, with their political representation being minimal or totally absent because of cultural
and structural barriers. The report noted that in 2013, across all legislative bodies, only a single woman with disability was elected to the national assembly. A man with disability
was elected to the Senate, five to the National Assembly, and 10 to the county assemblies.

Nominations remedied the situation: The senate ended up with three out of 67 members (4.5 per cent); National Assembly had nine out of 349 members (2.6
per cent), while county assemblies had 71 out 2,222 members (3.2 per cent).

Its still not yet Uhuru for persons with disabilities since the gains made in 2013 especially at the nomination at the county levels seems to be drained by the powers that be.

In the nomination 2017 it was a madden issue where 17 counties din’t nominate any person with a disability. The remaining 30 counties either also never followed the right procedure or they even some counties had fake persons with disabilities.
We should continuously question why society keeps acting as a barrier to the effective participation of persons with disability in all spheres of life. All of us have to consciously and directly challenge the stereotypes we hold towards persons with disability.

The government and its organs need to put its foot forward towards realizing disability mainstreaming and ensuring the meeting of the sustainable development goals by not living persons with disabilities behind.

Quadriplegic explore article by Wacianya with Additions from Mugambi Paul #CDS

HARSH INSPIRATION

Of course everybody is not going to love you,
With or without your disability,
Not everybody is going to like you,
Appreciate you,
Understand you,
Accommodate you,
Encourage you,
others may hold your assistive device,
others will talk much about you,
It’s your journey, come on!
Others may accompany you,
stare at glance,
Or choose not to,
Does it mean you terminate your journey?
You see even if you choose to terminate it,
Others will continue with theirs,
The hands of time will not stop,
Neither will they slow down,
It’s a jungle out there for everyone,
So don’t just sit in your pity potty,
Angry at life and fate,
Angry at everyone and everything,
Angry at your family, friends, strangers,
Goats, dogs, wind, rain, leadership, poor infrastructure sunshine….
Angry at you, come on!
It’s a race against time,
In pursuit of joy,
In pursuit of love and happiness,
In pursuit of fulfillment,
So rise up from your pity potty,
Go out there and live,
That’s the only life you have,
Love it,
Love yourself and love others,
None of us are getting out of here alive,
so please stop treating yourself like an after thought.
Eat the delicious food.
Walk in the sunshine.
Jump in
the ocean.
Say the truth that you’re carrying in your heart like hidden treasure.
Be silly.
Be kind.
Be weird. There’s no time for anything else.

Na uache ujinga,
Kumbaff!
#b the change
arise and shine
be out of the box.

Why Disability Representation In Kenyan Politics Matters More Than Ever

In the upcoming election 2017 in Kenya year,
how do we decide who to vote for? What issues are most important to us? I believe most of us seek a candidate
and a party that represents us. We want to see ourselves reflected not just in the candidates, but the ordinary people who support and represent them at
deligations, rallies, and commentaries. Yet for many people with disabilities, seeing someone on TV or at a political rally who looks like us, whose life
is like ours, is an unusual event. We have rarely been given a voice in national politics. Until now.

When I was a little boy, I had about a Blind man DR chomba who was trying to seek election post and was denied.
in history I have read a biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. I learned he had polio and that he was the first and thus far only
President with a significant physical
Disability in the world.

I also learned he felt he had to hide the extent of his disability, using braces and carefully staged photo opportunities to conceal the fact that he
couldn’t walk. He refused to be photographed in a wheelchair, to the point where very few photos of him using one survive. Although I understand his decision
in the context of the times, it doesn’t exactly make me feel pride as a person with a disability. He was one of the strongest leaders in U.S. history,
yet feared being perceived as weak because of stereotypes about disability.
I also Remember very well at the university those days of ours we celebrated the passage of the persons with disability’s act 2003 not because it was enacted but because retired president Kibaki had to be on a wheelchair for the nation to realize that we exist.
It had taken 10 years to happen even if some top government officials had children with disabilities who they hide.
Some years later, not long after the Kenyan With Disabilities Act became law, I visited ministry of education Jogoo house and found lifts.C. I remember marveling that the bathrooms in
the jogoow house building were wheelchair accessible, since that was unusual at the time. I asked one of our staff about it, and she said it was
because of
a staff with a physical disability
I had never heard of her before, but I felt immediate solidarity and pride. If she
could be a ministry official with a disability, I could accomplish anything I chose.
This was the time when we actively fought for the affirmative action on entyry to the university for the young generation who are wnjoying the fruits of our labor.
Many years after that, I have watched Representative
Mwaura
giving a speech on TV, proudly advancing the Albinism agenda.
the NCPWD Chair David sankok Politically championing issues
he usually strides across the stage on. There words are powerful, and there personality are dynamic. They inspire the public in that moment. They make many believe someone in our government might actually understand our lives and care about us. They all seem like someone who might
one day be President and do so while embracing there disability without shame.
Since then, politics have taken a turn for the nasty. We have a major party’s candidates talking about ableism tendacies “who can not see the development, who can not hear the development, holding forums in inaccessible stadia, mocking of persons with disabilities”
Persons with disabilities were being carried up the stairs.
All this are not acceptable in this era.
Most of the uttered statement in mother tongue do not get in to the media and leave the disability community talking about it.
am yet to see Jubilee party, CORD collition and other smaller parties having a person with disability from the tribe address the deligate conferences qualitatively. but it seemed no one else cared.

It seems we are known on paper.
Mwaura, David, Mutemi speech have been hard within us its high time they became viral and which can lead to interviews, appearances, and most importantly conversations about disability. We need to keep having those
conversations. It’s easy for politicians to throw a big party for themselves and say all the things they believe, but how often do they actually accomplish
what they promise to do? I appreciate the fact that the all mainstream TV now a days have the sign language interprators. If KSL on TV is quality that’s a story for another day.

people with disabilities have more opportunities than they did in the past. we have more opportunities than we had. But we also still have a long way
to go since we should stop enjoying good will and go for the real deals by stopping the politicians from using us as bargaining tools.
Supporting people with disabilities is about more than including us in deligate conferences speeches. It’s about passing important laws like the
Persons with Disability bill 2016 which am not sure if it will see parliament this year, having adoption of the marakesh treaty, having a carers legislation, KSL regulation, Sighted guide regulations, Adaptive technology legislation
Having a inclusive social protection security for all persons with disabilities

It’s about fighting for jobs for people with disabilities;
our unemployment rate
is far worse than other groups we talk about more. It’s about reforming “work incentives” that are supposed to help people with disabilities to work and
still receive essential health benefits like Medicare and in-home care, but actually make being employed overly complicated.
It’s about adding more teeth to the
disability act 2003 WDA
and pursuing change in cities behind the times and still have many businesses with basic access barriers like a single step at an entrance.

It’s about creating more affordable housing and accessible apartments and homes, so people with disabilities can find a place to live and older adults
can remain in their homes as they age.

It’s about investing in technologies of the future, such as self-driving cars, robotic limbs, and fully-featured powered wheelchairs, and ensuring they
are affordable to people with disabilities.
It’s about reforming our justice system, where people with developmental and mental health disabilities are disproportionately harmed, and promoting education,
treatment, and rehabilitation for nonviolent offenders.
It’s about recognizing that the disability rights struggle intersects with the struggles of other groups. Many people with disabilities, includingme ,
also belong to minority racial or ethnic groups..
When
we have conversations and learn to understand each other, we’ll find out how much we have in common and realize we shouldn’t let people try to divide us.
As voters, we have to decide which party and candidate we feel will best accomplish these goals. For me, ,persons with disabilities should not be put in to one basket.————
If the current 12 parliamentarians and the 72 Members of county assemblys have delivered to us or not that’s a story for another day.
With that said, I acknowledge that many important disability rights laws, including the Kenyans With Disabilities Act2003, were bipartisan efforts. I will
always be willing to have a dialogue with any respectful person, regardless of party affiliation. We can only accomplish change for people with disabilities
if we work together.

Follow this voyage
@mpofunamba1
#chief disability soldier
www.mugambipaul.com
#N.b the views here do not represent any organization but are personal.

How Dennis Itumbi Digital director statehouse wants you and me to celebrate his birthday

Aside

Pastor’s Moment
:
#Dennis Itumbi
Today I write to invite you to share my birthday with me on 19th March, at The Moi Avenue Primary School in Nairobi.

My invite, which I post today will be a long essay. Kindly read along.

Sometimes what we preach is best practiced.

The sermon on that day, is what Paul wrote to the Galatians 2:10 “….Only, they asked us to remember the poor, the very thing I was eager to do.”

On that day, we will do something different.

We will cook Chapatti’s (Chapos) for street children.

I am asking you to come with a rolling pin, a packet of Unga if you can, but most importantly, energy and passion and let us cook together.

#ChapatiForum
led by
Roman Kariuki
and
Anna Anne
will be in the house coordinating the cooking and the mentoring. Ann has been working with street kids for the last few months and will bring on board
a lot of insights

If you have old clothes, blankets, shoes, please come with them and let us interact and add a little warmth and smile to someone we do not know.

Now I know all those questions, why food for one day? why street children is that not encouraging them to flood the city instead of clearing them?

I considered those questions at length before deciding to share my birthday and to mobilise my friends and all of you to be part of the initiative, offering
your friendship to that group of people is to offer my best resource to strangers, I therefore got have answers for those deep questions.

I value your time and friendship, I will never mobilise you to service for the sake of it – let me therefore explain.

Out of all possible groups like children homes, the aged and all, I consider Street Children and the homeless as the best challenge, without good challenge
we rarely stretch ourselves to the limit.

I have never heard a comprehensive solution for this group of people. However, one of the first steps we can take is be friends to them as a people and
share the values of humanity with them.

My experience on this matter changed one day, when a young girl walked to me, not nagging me for some cash, instead she told me, ” brathee usinifukuze,
tomb tu ni kama naomxa peas nitakuambia halo mbelee….” (My brother do not chase me away, just keep walking as if am pestering you for cash)

Skipping the details, she explained that she needed to get away from the eyes of the mother who was hiding somewhere watching her and that all she wanted
was to go to school and get her family out of the streets.

I did not buy her story. but I handed her cash some for the mother and some for her and the younger bro.

Before walking away, I asked her if she knew any school in Nairobi. She mentioned xxxx Primary School. “Sisi hulala kwa kachorochoro hapo karibu..” (we
sleep in a pathway next to the school)

I told her we meet there the next day if she was serious. I did not give a time. To be sincere I did not even turn up the next day.

Many weeks later, the same girl approached me near I&M building and before i could employ a popular strategy blaming her for not turning up, she told me,
“usijali, naelewa umekuwa kazi, tuma mtu ama upige simu shule..”(Do not worry, I know you have been working, please send someone or call the school)

She had turned up for our school date, she sat at the stage the entire day and waited unsuccessfully for me, admiring different children as they carried
their school bags to school.

But the mistrust accumulated fairly over the years, filled my view with smoke, i could not see the sincerity in her eyes and the passion in her heart only
stopped by lack of resources and an upbringing that had taught her she could only make it in life by begging for favours.

At her age she had decided she was not going to live a life of begging by choice, she was going to try and rewrite her narrative and curve a new path for
her destiny.

“Mimi ndio najua hii maisha, mimi ndio nitamaliza mambo ya chokora nikisoma,” (I understand street life, I will deal with it and finish it if I go through
school)

Anyway, she was admitted to school and since we have free primary education the cost was minimal, 40 bob a day for Lunch in school. and other administrative
costs came to less than 15,000 for the whole year plus uniform costs.

But after school it meant she was going to sleep along family on a pathway. Thats not all the mother supplements family income by engaging in prostitution
with drunkards – i will not go to the details of that for now.

A teacher offers to get a house for the family near the school to avoid transport costs, we pay 6 months rent, but there is a problem they have a brother
who also needs to go to school, that too is sorted.

But a bigger problem is yet to be resolved, the mother now has a location for her prostitution and the children we come to learn from the young girl is
firmly exposed.

I will tell the rest of the story someday, including the other initiatives that have to be employed to have this children both who are doing well remain
in schools and the problems associated with it.

The bottom line is, we can change the story of street children by letting them access the tools and means that can empower them to participate i the solution
about them.

Most importantly we do not have to wait to strategic plans to come to life, someday they will, but we can change their lives, one street child at a time,
by just sharing love and listening to them

It is on that ground that I am providing a platform for you to spend a day with them, for you to cook Chapos for them (as we see if you really can cook
what you claim unakalia ama umekaliwa) and I must say there is no better place for me to mark my birthday than with those great kids and their families
too.

It is scripture that records that, “The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine,
you did for me.’

“… For I was hungry and you gave me nothing to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, I was a stranger and you did not invite me in, I
needed clothes and you did not clothe me, I was sick and in prison and you did not look after me.’ …

If you can do any of those please do.

I dedicate my 2016 birthday to Street children and the homeless

God Bless You and Keep You
#be counted
#if I will be present why not you