Will the “Disabled” Kenyans cry foul after being left in Coronavirus conversations? Author Mugambi Paul

In order not to live the disabled Kenyans who are the largest minority, who make up 15 % of the population.
I opine, disabled Kenyans they deserve not to be left behind.
There is an urgent need for Ministry of health in Kenya to address the rights and needs of disabled person throughout all COVID-19 planning and response.
In other words, for maximum community results in the recent updates from the national and county governments there is the need to close the glaring gap of inclusivity.

Available facts:
Children and adults with disabilities and older adults are 2-4 times more likely to be injured or die in a disaster due to a lack of planning, accessibility, and accommodation. Most people with disabilities are not inherently at a greater risk for contracting COVID-19, despite misconception that all people with disabilities have acute medical problems.
Kenyan government Actions taken now can make a big difference in COVID-19 outcomes
Additionally, the disability sector from both the state and non state actors need to raise the voice not just to remain mum.
Are disabled persons represented at the national emergency committee established by the president?
Are the needs of the disabled catered for in the contingency plans?

Lessons learnt:
One of the greatest lessons in the fight of HIV aids in Kenya is that the disabled persons were not involved nor consulted in the plans strategies for combating the menace.
It took few disability stakeholders to get the national aids control council to ensure inclusivity is realized.
When shall the disabled stakeholders learn not to be left behind?
Should the disability society be involved after the rest of the population? we
Moreover, USAID was very critical in supporting disabled stakeholders in achieving active disability engagements.
Worst still, many disabled persons weren’t aware of how to prevent themselves from the HIV AIDS infection. Many disabled Kenyans died, and many being taken advantage of by the society perceptions and behaviours [HI 2007]
This is because of the late response to the needs of disabled persons.
Several studies showed the greater involved of disabled Kenyans in awareness, contributed to reduction of stigma and discrimination associated with disability and HIV aids.
It also ensured representation in National aids committees, and prevention promoted reduction of spread of the disease. [NACC 2008, Liverpool 2007 HI 2007[.

Role of the disability sector:
Needless to say, disability stakeholders can play a crucial role by facilitating support to the ministry of health on inclusive strategies which will address the needs of the disabled Kenyans.

Legal Obligations and Training
On the other hand, Public and private agencies that provide services to persons with disabilities must be aware of their legal obligations and must train their employees appropriately. When public and private agencies and businesses are unclear about their legal responsibilities, there are no limitations in providing greater than minimum levels of support and services to persons with disabilities. Lack of understanding is NEVER an acceptable reason for failing to meet legal obligations, including throughout emergency circumstances.
Furthermore, the ministry of health has a has a legal obligation to provide equal access to public health emergency services to disabled Kenyans, including throughout a pandemic since our president issued an executive order
Coupled with the support one of the pillars of the big 4 agenda, of Kenyan 2010 constitution on right to access to health services and international conventions.

Needs of disabled Kenyans:

I observe disabled Kenyans require the same resources and assistance that all citizens deserve.
in other words, adequate information and instructions, social and medical services, and protection from infection by those who might contracted the virus. However, some disabled Kenyans may have needs that warrant specific reasonable accommodation by the public and private sectors that may not be necessary for Kenyans without disabilities. This is not much to ask since the current strategies by both national and county governments have not addressed the reasonable accommodations.

For instance, Communications Authority has approved sending of bulk information messages on coronavirus by the Ministry of Health to all subscribers of local mobile phone operators.
I beg to ask:
Are persons with intellectual impairment, Deaf, Blind, psychosocial disabilities able to consume this information?
1. Can the government provide alternative formats of communication in awareness raising? Disabled Kenyans need to be informed of why Ministry of health believe that certain actions are warranted, to be given an opportunity to ask questions and receive answers in an accessible format, and to be afforded the opportunity to object and propose alternative solutions.
2. Another example, the Bagathi hospital has been designated to be the official self-quarantine place.
Has it met accessibility standards?
Are the beds easily accessible and user friendly to Kenyans with mobility impairments?
Moreover, in some places, the distribution of protective equipment, food, and medical supplies might be warranted. If Point of Distribution locations are established, government and private stakeholders must address how these supplies and equipment will be distributed and accessed by disabled Kenyans, elderly and others who have difficulties in movement and lack means of travel. Disabled Kenyans have the right to receive services in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs.
All in all, the existing legal protections of disabled Kenyans remain in effect under all circumstances. These protections are not subject to waivers or exceptions, even during public health emergencies or declared pandemics.
I Hope there will be no contrition on this journey of ensuring disabled become part of the solutions.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Celebrating our super parents: Guest Author Odumbe Kute

It occurred to me yesterday after something I posted that prejudice and discrimination, whether conscious or sub-conscious is a very big deal in our lives.
I’ve been a disability and human rights activist for over 24 years and the one thing that rings true through all the work I’ve done around the world is
this. No amount of legislation, education and advocacy will ever cover for ignorance and prejudice about disability that is experienced every single day
by those affected.

It’s not just the general public. The worst offenders are family, close relatives and people who masquerade as friends. The thing is this. Most people
act the way they do, discriminate like they do, judge like they do, say really stupid and very hurtful things like they do, gossip like they do, show their
prejudice like they do because they’re afraid. You’d like to think that they’re just ignorant, but the truth is that they’re afraid. Afraid of what is
different, afraid of their own insecurities, afraid of how they would cope if they were ever in a situation where they would acquire a disability, give
birth to a child with a disability, have a spouse who acquires a disability or have to care for someone with a disability.

They go around calling themselves “normal”, whatever the hell that is. Here’s a wake up call. At least 1 of every 5 people in the world has a disability
of some sort, most of them hidden and not visible to people. It could be mental health, it could be chronic back pain, it could be sickle cell, it could
be a neurological condition ranging from autism to ADHD, it could be any number of debilitating conditions that people are shit scared to talk about for
fear that they might get labelled or judged. They refuse to look at it as a disability. They only choose to consider disability as a physical and medical
thing.

I haven’t even begun to talk about the hundreds of thousands of parents who have a differently abled child. Our society is brutal. Take the mothers of
kids with a disability from autism to CP, from physical to sensory disabilities. Those who stay in relationships and marriages after giving birth to a
differently abled child are considered the lucky ones. But are they really? Most mothers of children with a disability are single because they’ve been
abandoned at the traffic lights. They’ve been ostracized and become outcasts in their own families, in their marital families, amongst their friends and
relatives. They are seen as vessels of witchcraft, accused of bringing forth defective offspring that sully the gene pool of the family. They not only
have to deal with the challenges their child or children face, they are also as individuals, totally discriminated against and judged for every move they
make.

Let me tell you something about these women. They are amazing. They are Ninjas. They are super women, most of whom have to give up their entire lives,
their hopes and dreams and they sacrifice everything to give their differently abled children the best chance they have in life. They live isolated lives
because of the open and mostly hidden discrimination they face by people closest to them. But the one thing that will never be taken away from them is
their resolve, unconditional love, determination and sheer stubbornness in not giving up their default role as primary care givers to their children.

Most if not all these women go through hell every single day to make sure that their children have the best they can have in life, despite their individual
means. Some can hustle and get a shilling here and there, some don’t have that opportunity. Even for families who would ordinarily be financially stable,
the cost of therapy, medication, education, nutrition – you name it, is capable of bringing them to their knees. Some of these women cry themselves to
sleep every single night praying to their God and asking why he or she has forsaken them. And yet, the next morning, they wake up and do it all over again.

I submit to you that you “normal” people as you call yourselves; you people who have perfect lives that allow you to pass judgement over those who have
a different life; you people who stare and shake your head in disgust at a mother whose autistic child is having a melt-down in a supermarket and saying
that “what is wrong with that mother, her child is spoilt”; you people who have the luxury of not knowing the pain of a mother with a non-verbal autistic
child who is in unbearable pain and distress and unable to express themselves; you people who judge and come out with ignorant and stupid comments like
“that one was bewitched”, “that one’s dowry wasn’t paid and that’s why they have a disabled child”, “that one must have done something in a previous life”
– I submit to you that whichever God you pray to is kind enough to have spared you and gave you the right to be ignorant and stupid. Because if you were
ever in the situation that others are in, society has to be lucky that your not one of the ones who will be able to cope with the burden and responsibility
of caring for and loving someone who is different. Pray to that God of yours to never put you in a situation that you become disabled, a spouse or child
of yours becomes disabled, or you give birth to a child with a disability.

Why have I written this post you may ask. It’s because of the sheer amount of in-box messages I’ve got from parents of children with a disability, mostly
those on the autism spectrum, who were absolutely furious that I had to explain that my son is autistic to parents that commented on my post and took the
“your child is bloody spoilt” view. There is a parallel here to real life where the constant need to explain to those who are discriminatory and prejudicial
has become tedious for them and enough is enough.

Let me conclude with a simple example. A couple of weeks ago, a distressed mother on one of the support groups posted a question asking what they can give
their autistic child to calm them down when she has guests. Let me first say, many kids on the autism spectrum will be on medication, and this should only
be for their benefit and if it improves their development. But the thought of having to medicate your autistic child to make it easier for guests? I was
like – Fuck that. The only intervention needed is to bitch slap those guests out of your house. If your own guests cannot come to terms with the fact that
your child is autistic, they have absolutely no right to be guests in your home, let alone friends.

The Outrage of the missing data of women with disabilities in Kenya “where are you my sisters?” Author Mugambi Paul.

The upcoming international women day’s gives scholars, practitioners and other public policy stakeholders to ask ourselves the pertinent question.
Has Kenya done well in advancing the rights of women and girls with disabilities?
Has Kenya broken the barriers of inclusion of women with disabilities?
Has the disability space been accommodative of women with disabilities?

As a public scholar I join in the reflection of the Kenyan disability public space.
Absolutely not, this is one of the debates which the stakeholders in the disability sector need to engage.
Are women with disabilities actively engaged?
I live that to other analysts. As a matter of principle, I say representation matters.
On the other hand, I thank the president of Kenya having appointed Madam MUkhobe at the highest decision-making organ in the country since 2013.
Where is the Data and statistics of the disabled?
Numbers don’t lie.
Globally disabled persons are at 15 %.
3.8 of the are persons with moderate to severe impairment.
5.1 % of the children with disabilities are below the age of 14.
0.7 % have severe functional impairment.
19 % are women with disabilities world report 2011.
To put matters into perspective, In the latest 2020 national council of population report has no data of women or girls with disabilities.
Does this mean that women and girls with disabilities do not get pregnant?
Are women and girls with disabilities not sexually active?
Different media channels on a weekly basis in Kenya have been reporting of how women and girls with disabilities have been experiencing gender-based violence in the hands of family members or even under the institutions mint to support them.
I believe This is another big blow to disabled persons in Kenya after the release of Kenya bureau of statistics 2019 census report. Which in essence reduced the data of disabled Kenyans.

Will disability sector continue with the same old ways of addressing this challenge?
Will the disability sector move out of board rooms and actualize the dreams of girls and women with disabilities?
Does the national council of population have a disability mainstreaming committee?
The lack of disability desegregated data will obviously affect planning and service delivery for girls, boys, men and women with disabilities.
In other words, the national council of population affirms that women and girls with disabilities have never experienced gender-based violence nor gotten pregnant.
Let me remind the disability stakeholders women with disabilities are more likely to experience sexual violence than women without disabilities.
This is also coupled with disabled Kenyans who face barriers to accessing services in both public and private sectors.
Most disability policy stakeholders know the barriers that disabled Kenyans face but have refused to actualize them.
Disabled Kenyans persons have been left chanting in the social media as a tool of advocacy.
Am not surprised to note in March 4th, 2020 a person with physical impairment was begging for a wheelchair on in one of the social media platforms.
Which system works for disabled Kenyans?
Will the Big four agenda be realized for disabled persons?
When will Kenya declare begging an economic enterprise for disabled persons since the constitution provisions aren’t working for disabled Kenyans?
several studies show Women and girls living with disabilities often face additional marginalization in their experiences of abuse as well as specific barriers to accessing services, due to:
• economic and/or physical dependence on the abuser, which challenges efforts to escape (particularly within family and sometimes institutional set ups. Several research in Kenya have indicated women with disabilities have suffered from forms of abuse specific to women living with disabilities (e.g. withholding of right medications, like the case of national children council exposed by NTV Kenya in 2019.
research done by women with disabilities organizations in Kenya show denial of assistive devices is also rampant.
Additionally, there is also refusal to provide personal care), which are less documented and may not be explicit within legal definitions of abuse.
For instance, Menstrual Health in Kenya: Landscape Analysis published in May 2016 never showed the extent to which women and girls with disabilities can’t access sanitary pads.
As Well lack of or limitations in physical accessibility of venues for women with disabilities still remains one of the barriers.
Furthermore, perceptions by service providers like health continue to plague the system in place.
This is because many believe that they cannot provide services for women with disabilities given their resource or capacity limitations. Mainstream women organizations and women service providers have not entrenched any inclusive measures of engaging or consulting women with disabilities.
In other words, lack of programming informed by and implemented in consultation with Kenyan women with disabilities or misinterpretation of their needs in escaping and overcoming the abuse they have experienced. Thus, having gaps in collaboration between disability organizations and service providers supporting survivors, as well as assumptions by each group that survivors are served by the other. A study by Kenya national human rights commission in 2015 indicated low sensitivity among law enforcement personnel or other service providers, who may not inquire about abuse by caretakers, or disregard reports from women with visual, speech/communication or motor coordination disabilities (e.g. cerebral palsy), assuming they are intoxicated or are not serious in their claims. The KAIH who have been working closely in the legal apparatus affirm that biases among judicial personnel and courts is evidently seen.
For instance, cases of provision of preferential treatment to the abuser in child custody due to the victim’s disability (

What can disability sector and stakeholders do to change the narrative?
Develop Strategies and tools to prevent violence against women with disability. E.g. have inclusive training tools on gender violence.
Ensure collection of data collected is gender, age and disability desegregated in reporting and monitoring
Share best practices of gender and disability equitable practice
develop inclusive Referral system and services which can assist in responding to women with disability who experience violence
have more role models among women with disabilities.
Collaborative initiatives with the mainstream women organizations
list end support men with and without disabilities who are supporting reduction of gender-based violence initiatives.
Conduct inclusive training to service providers in both health and law enforcing agencies.
Ensure engagement and meanful consultation with women and girls with disabilities from rural and urban set up.
This will actualize the slogan not living any one behind as the sustainable development goals advocate.
global commitments 2018.

In conclusion:
The truth of the matter is Kenya is known to have progressive disability
related laws and policies but poor implementation is the order of the day.
As a result the dire state of affairs of women with disabilities is not due to lack of new ideas. The biggest problem is lack of capacity to take up and implement the new ideas in existing policy documents.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Disabled Kenyans outcry of the elusive accessible housing plans: Author Mugambi Paul

According to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities it recognizes the right of persons with disabilities to adequate housing and their right to social protection (article 28). The Convention was adopted in 2006 and ratified by 180 countries, where Kenya is one of the earliest countries to do so.
more importantly in 2017 Kenya adapted the big 4 agenda where affordable housing is one of the key issue.

Where are we:
Arguably, there have been back and forth debates on how the public will be entitled to the affordable housing schemes in Kenya.
There has no been any agreeable way between the 3 arms of government and the public at large.
The lack of public participation in the affordable housing seam to have reached rock bottom.
This is coupled with lack of clear policy frameworks which could ultimately have guided the process.
In Jamuhuri 2019 the president of Kenya seem to have soften the stand on involuntary housing contribution. This has led to treasury in 2020 February budget policy estimates to the Parliament to say that it will allocated 0 budget for housing plan.
Although the private sector is investing on the housing agenda.

What’s happening at the National level?

In 2015, the UN Member States adopted the Sustainable Development Goals which call for access for all to affordable housing and implementation of appropriate social protections systems for all, including persons with disabilities (Goals 11 and 1).
But Kenyans with disabilities remain largely invisible in the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of these commitments. Notably, Lack of reliable and timely data, evidence and research on persons with disabilities continue to pose challenges to the inclusion of persons with disabilities and the full implementation of Sustainable Development Goals, including Goals 1 and 11.
This is affirmed by the latest Kenya bureau of statistics 2020 where disabled numbers dwindled.
Lessons for policy makers in the disability sector:
Mobilization of expertise on disability inclusion in housing agenda needs to be considered.
Disabled persons organizations need to participate in public participation forums to ensure their issues are hard by the ministry of housing and transport.
The disability sector policy makers need to resource and facilitate disabled Kenyans to this process of ensuring inclusive measures are observed.
The disability sector should demand 15 % of the housing units being constructed to be accessible and owned by disabled Kenyans.
The UN report 2018 shows that despite the progress made in recent years, persons with disabilities continue to face numerous barriers to access affordable and adequate housing and a disproportionate number of persons with disabilities are homeless. They face many barriers that prevent them from enjoying their right to adequate housing, including higher levels poverty, lack of access to employment, discrimination and lack of support for independent living.
On the other hand, On 19th February 2020 the gavel fell on the
58th session of the UN Commission for Social Development,
which agreed the text of the historical first United Nations resolution on homelessness. A serious violation of human dignity, homelessness has become
a global problem. It is affecting people of all ages from all walks of life, in both developed and developing countries.
Relevance of data:
Globally, 1.6 billion people worldwide live in inadequate housing conditions, with about 15 million forcefully evicted every year, according to UN-Habitat,
which has noted an alarming rise in homelessness in the last 10 years. Young people are the age group with the highest risk of becoming homeless.

The UN Commission’s resolution recognizes that people are often pushed into homelessness by a range of diverse social and economic drivers.

“It could happen to anyone. It’s not always drugs, alcohol. It’s not always something external. Life happens. And life can happen to a whole lot of us.
It did during the great financial crisis, and it could very well happen again”, said Chris Gardner, who had described his experience of homelessness in
his bestselling book, “The Pursuit of Happiness”.

“We, as a great human society, we are diminished, we lose the gift of their creativity, the gift of their curiosity, the gift of their potential when it
is marooned by all downstream consequences of homelessness”, said Mary McAleese, Former President of Ireland.

“I will never forget my first experience with homelessness. I, unfortunately, was born into a family plagued by a chain of events which included domestic
violence”, added Chris Gardner. “My one regret about being here today is that the two most important people in the world to me couldn’t be here today‐‐‐I’m
referring to my granddaughter and my goddaughter. One of them says that she wants to become the President of the United States and the other one says
that she wants to become an astronaut and go to the moon. And you know what I say to both of them every day? Let’s go!!! THAT’S THE POWER of ONE!”

In its resolution of the UN Commission for Social Development calls for a response by all sectors within Governments and societies. The Commission recommended
the resolution for adoption by the UN Economic and Social Council later this year.

The Commission also celebrated the
25th anniversary of the World Summit for Social Development
and its Copenhagen Declaration. Stakeholders and experts from all over the world expressed strong support for the work of the Commission, noting that
the outcome of the Copenhagen Summit remains relevant today and continues to guide social development in their countries.
Kenya ministry of social protection was recognized on this event.
All in all with the current trends in Kenya it remains a pipe dream for having accessible housing in place.
This is because there are no adequate measure or regulation in place to ensure real inclusion is achieved in housing agenda.
What remains is the low confused undertones among the Kenyan disability community without knowing which direction to take!

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

The Deep Crises in the Kenyan disability sector Author Mugambi Paul.

Kenya is a country faced ultimately by many challenges as a developing nation.
Issues of disabled persons seem to be hanging in the Kenyan movie of activities.
No one or any institution seems to understand how to handle the first pace changes taking place in the global disability sector.
The disability sector seems to be blaming each other for the failures and the inadequacies felt by the wanjikus with disabilities.
Issues ranging from lack of representation in the building bridge initiative, lack of adequate data from the Kenyan bureau of statistics to delayed
Service delivery.
Let me not dwell on the Corana virus.
As a public policy scholar let be engrain me to the importance of collecting desegregated
data for disabled. Persons.
According to standard media, the release of additional census data by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS) should be a wake-up call to policy makers in both the county and national governments. The numbers present valuable information on trends and patterns within the country’s demographic that should inform policy decisions and resource distribution
This was after the realise of the numbers byt the Kenya bureau of statistics. Unfortunately, for disabled person it was a bitter peal to take having lots of expectations.
The data presented seem to have reduced the numbers of persons with disabilities.
What happened?
The reality check indicates the lack of proper representation and lack of technical knowhow of disability data desegregation took place.
did the disability sector participate in the cycle of activities at the Kenya bureau of statistics?
The data released seems to be negative.
Reasons?
First application and training of the use of the Washington group of questioners was not properly conducted.
Secondly no pilot activity was done on how to collect disability desegregated data.
Thirdly the training of enumerators was a second thought.
Fourthly, were the organization of disabled persons involved in the process?

Facts for consideration:
It is well known. That
An estimated one billion people worldwide live with disabilities. Of the world’s poorest people, one in five live with disabilities.
Notable, in developing nations like Kenya conditions where we lack material resources as well as opportunities to exercise power, reach our full potential, and flourish in various aspects of life. (WHO and World Bank, 2011).
Globally, People with disabilities were not listed as a priority in the Millennium Development Goals. This is also true in the Kenyan context where disabled persons are not listed in the big 4 agenda. As a result, there is exclusion from many development initiatives, representing a lost opportunity to address the economic, educational, social, and health concerns of millions of the Kenyan’s most marginalized citizens (UN, 2011). In contrast, for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, United Nations member states pledged to leave no one behind, recognizing that development programming must be inclusive of people with disabilities.
Expected irreducible minimum:
To ensure disability-inclusive development, disability data must capture the degree to which society is inclusive in all aspects of life: work, school, family, transportation, and civic participation, inter alia. Disaggregating disability indicators will allow us to understand the quality of life of people with disabilities, towards developing programs and policies to address existing disparities.
Opportunity for Kenya disability movement:
Kenyan disability movement should stop board room meetings among themselves and join where the cake is being mashed and prepared.
At the Global Disability Summit in July 2018, the World Bank announced new commitments on disability desegregated data support to countries.
Specifically, the Bank pledged resources to strengthen disability data by scaling up disability data collection and use, guided by global standards and best practices.
This commitment is aligned with the World Bank’s October 2015 pledge to support the 78 poorest countries in conducting household surveys every three years. Regular household surveys are an excellent option for disability measurement, as they can be stratified to oversample people who are more likely to experience limited participation in society. In multi-topic household surveys, disability data can be collected along with other socioeconomic data, enabling a richer analysis of the experiences of people with disabilities. Finally, regular household survey programs can measure the change over time and space in key indicators such as the frequency of types of disability, severity of disability, quality of life, opportunities and participation of people with disabilities, and rehabilitation needs. For example, the recently launched 50×30 initiative may offer a good opportunity to collect disaggregated farm- and rural-related indicators by disability status
The Kenyan disability sector should stop ghetorization of disability issues and we shall realize real mainstreaming when we speak to where barriers exist.
It is encouraging that more disabled persons in the social media are demanding a specific census for persons with disabilities.
Weather this will be executed time will tell.
All in all, we need a model survey for disabled persons in order to have proper planning and ensure we get the Kenyan national cake.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Will you Be my Valentine? “Tips for an extra special day with your blind partner” Author Mugambi Paul

Friendship, love, and romance are in the air with Valentine’s Day in Nairobi..

Whether you’re on your first date, or it’s your tenth with your true love, planning the right date night, getting the right flowers, a gift, dinner reservations,
etc can be a bit stressful.

And you may imagine that going on a first date with someone who is blind or visually impaired can even be more awkward.

But in reality, going on a date with someone who is blind or low vision is no different than dating any other person.

Here are a few tips for sighted companions or partners to help make your date memorable.

#1 Sighted Guide

Consent is key! Once you’ve selected a place, made a reservation or planned an activity, don’t forget to brush up on your sighted guide technique.

There is an etiquette to offering sighted guide assistance to a blind person. Always ask first, don’t grab or push.

Now a days I combine my White cane experience with Sunu Band
to navigate indoor spaces like restaurants and cafes. Moreover, it has aided me with the line like at theaters, so I know when it’s my turn to move up in the queue.

The Sunu Band is also great for when you are doing a sighted guide as the blind or low vision person being guided retains awareness and more control.

#2 Be descriptive

But not overly so – allow your partner the chance to soak in the ambiance.

Now that you’ve arrived at that fancy, romantic restaurant or place, offer a lite description of where you are to your partner.

Allow your blind partner the chance to ask about his/or her surroundings.

#3 Don’t just read the menu

make it conversation instead of reading a list.
You know Nairobi hotels and restaurant do not offer braille, or large print menus, you have to check with your partner their preference.

If those aren’t available, you can start by asking what are they’re in the mood for drink and food? If it’s a place you know well, make a recommendation
or mention the specialty of the house.

But whatever you do, don’t order or speak for your blind or low vision partner. Especially, don’t allow waiters or staff to ask you to speak for your blind
partner.

In the event it happens, tell your waiter to direct the question or comment to your partner.

#4 Table manners are still king

And throw away the messy stereotypes. Enjoying a meal with someone who is blind or low vision is just like eating or drinking with anyone else. Again being
a little bit more descriptive is good.

When the meal arrives, you may offer a quick description of where things are on the table. For example, your wine glass is to your left or at your 9 O’clock.
Sometimes using the clock reference is helpful.

Remember, don’t overdo it and stress about the vision impairment. Just be yourself and enjoy each other’s company through great conversation, drinks, and
food. At the end of the date, the most important thing is that you both have fun.

Additionally, everyday should be a valentine.
You should even practise self-love.
Self-love means allowing yourself to be happy. Too often, we manipulate ourselves instead of increasing the amount of joy we bring to our lives.

So, every day, do things that make you feel good. Even 10 minutes of self-care can add up and make you feel much better in the long run. But you’re worth
more than 10 minutes. You are the most crucial person in your life. Act, accordingly, show love, and be open to receive love.
All in all, do things that fulfill your soul. Get rid of people who don’t make you feel good.
What others say or think about you has nothing to do with reality. It’s just their perception.

Sure, we’d all like to be around people who are kind and loving, but the harsh reality is that rudeness exists. Yet, it doesn’t need to affect you and
especially not your wellbeing.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

“DISABILITY LENCE” The unspoken truth of the Kakamega school tragedy! Author Mugambi Paul

In the recent past more schools in Kenya are reporting deaths and newly disabled pupils in unclear circumstances. Yet we have lots of resources’ and commitments towards achieving sDG number 4 and meeting the Kenya 2030 vision.
Kakamega school is not the last in this zero-game played by lack of observation of accessibility standards.
Kenya has lots of different pieces of legislations which needs harmonization and have a clear state organ to lead in implementation.
In September 2019 a classroom crushed at Precious Talents Top School in Nairobi killing 8.
Up to now no one has been convicted nor a report produced.
How many more should die or get disabled?
I opine that Schools have become death traps for future leaders and different influencers.
The unspoken truth is that the lack of observation of built accessibility standards seems to be the major setback towards this issue.
How many more will die or get disabled so that policy makers will protect the innocent lives?
Schools are meant to be safe heaven away from the harsh times in Kenya.
I believe the different policy makers seem not to grasp what is ailing lots of buildings in the country.
Kenya seems to be mark timing on the root course of collapsing of buildings and stampede in build environment.
The voice of the disabled:
the disability sector in Kenya have maintained the traditional tune of wait and see who will blink first.
I observe that more persons have become disabled in search kind of disasters.
How are disabled persons included in disaster management?
How are the newly disabled persons included in the new club membership?
What are the support measures put in place to ensure the persons who have acquired disabilities have a smooth ride of inclusion?
According to different studies, it is moment like this when the disabled persons organizations and allies of the disability sector are needed to raise the voice of accessibility.
It would be prudent to see policy makers within and without the disability sector setting record stay straight on having national accessibility standards.
One of the commitments made by the Kenyan government is about inclusive education in July 2019.
Could the stakeholders in the disability sector stand up and make a statement?
Shall we continue to be left behind?
Disability media reporting:
This is one of the major gaps in the media industry.
The exact desegregated data of the newly disabled persons is not given nor reported.
Recommendation:
The national construction authority needs to conduct an accessibility audit of all schools.
This will aid the non-compliant schools to be shut down by the ministry of education.
The national construction authority has the capacity in resource mobilization and expertise in built environment.
Moreover, what they might need capacity on is technical support on conducting inclusive audits.
When will the ministry of education issue a decree on accessibility standards in school just like the way the Cabinet secretary ordered pregnant girls to be admitted in form one?
All in all, as a public policy scholar I believe disability mainstreaming will be achieved when all institutions take responsibility and not to wait for a policing unit to actualize inclusion.
When we make built environment accessible for all it benefits everyone not the disabled only.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

The cost of remaining mum on Kenyans living with disabilities and individuals with chronic illness Author Mugambi Paul

Research shows that most chronic illnesses can affect every single part of individuals life, but it doesn’t really look like it. Some chronic illnesses have constant pains and fatigue among individuals [WHO 2011].
On the other hand, I have engaged several individual in the social media platforms.
This has led me to learn several lessons
You might not know a person is suffering if you don’t communicate ]HI 2011].
I classify some of these individuals as having invisible disabilities.
This is to say invisible disabilities mean that often times,
people don’t believe that actually individuals can be sick. This leads to people saying common things that, despite usually having good intentions, can come off as rude,
dismissive, and ableist.

The one I’ve heard the most is something that has undoubtedly been said to every person with an invisible disability or illness – the dreaded ‘but you
don’t look disabled nor sick!’. This happens all too often as an offhand comment, but it’s also been followed by heartbreaking situations like eventually losing friends
who haven’t believed that chronic illness or having impairment was real because people don’t look or act sick in the way they think one should be?
So, to give you a bit of a crash course, here’s some examples of what NOT to say to people with chronic illness.

‘But you don’t look sick!’

Yep, I know – but I am. These five words reduce health down to appearance, which is not the case at all. You might be saying this with the best intentions
(hopefully shock, because someone look ~too stunning~ for someone who’s actually very ill) but what it actually does is hits on one of the biggest fears of chronically
ill people – that people don’t believe them.
Actually,
Personally, whenever someone says this, it just reminds me of the many times people haven’t believed I can’t see because I didn’t *look* Blind. You might mean it supportively,
but all I hear is doubt.
This is because am super in mobility and orientation especially in familiar territories.
Sometimes it’s an anxious moment for me when individuals with out disabilities just plainly discuss behind my back “look at him, he is just pretending, he is comfortable” not knowing I have to go an extra mile to orient myself, secondly he or she doesn’t know that I have to do it since I don’t have alternative.
Additionally, I note that Not all illnesses are visible.
I can guarantee you; every chronically ill person has tried absolutely everything they physically and financially can. I cannot think of one person who’s
simply said, ‘ah bugger, I’m chronically ill. I’m not going to bother trying things to feel better!’
Trust me, some have tried it all; all the doctors’ and specialists’ suggestions, and yes, a bunch of the tinfoil hat ones too (desperation and lack of medical
answers make for strange bedfellows).

Examples of suggestions of what my friends the blind community and other persons with disabilities have tried including: various supplements, Chinese herbs, marijuana, LSD, ketamine, essential
oils, drinking their own urine, crystals, B12 shots, spirulina, charcoal, detoxes and juice fasts, prayer and religion – the list goes on,
as a blind fellow you can guest which one of them, I have tried I’ll let you ponder on which).

And before you ask, yes
You have seen many disabled persons, the chronic ill persons going to work, or you saw a photo of one catching up with a friend on the weekend. That’s irrelevant to whether he or she look ‘okay’ to you now
He or she still remains ill, and he or she maintains his or her impairment since they do not disappear.
According to several studies they indicate the nature of chronic illness is, sadly, extremely can be unpredictable. One can have totally manageable levels of pain and fatigue one day, and barely able to
walk the next. Sometimes it’s because one accidentally overexerted himself and went over my limits, but sometimes symptoms flaring can be completely random.
If you find it annoying, just try to imagine how frustrating it is for individuals with chronic illnesses. Regardless, some have always sick and in pain – some days some are just able to manage
it (and hide it!) better than others.

‘You just need to snap out of it and push through.’

‘Pushing through’ actually makes someone, and many others with chronic pain and illness, worse.
In Kenya and other developing countries there is no particular policy framework addressing concerns of persons with chronic illnesses although a mention here and there on different framework.
Most families carry the burden of taking care of chronic ill individuals and this affects the economic and social wellbeing of the society at large. The resources used to trat could have been used for other functions [ILO 2017, undp 2016].
Its high time we have particular social protection measure to address persons who have chronic illnesses.
Moreover, one of the major experientials in the disability world and chronic illness which seems to be similar is the way the society expects us to push ourselves beyond our limits
Obviously its so great to push beyond limit but this doesn’t apply to all persons. What the society doesn’t understand persons with disabilities and individuals with chronic illnesses are not a homogenous group.
one is sick or disabled every single day, and know their body and their limits better than anyone – so telling one to ‘push through’ is actually
the worst possible advice. When you’re talking to someone with disability or a chronic illness, remember just because you’d be able to manage something, doesn’t mean
they can or should. Don’t assume someone’s health and limits for them. It totally removes their agency as a human being.
Besides having a disability some individuals might also be having chronic illnesses.
‘You’re too young to be sick!’ or sometimes for disabled persons they say woyee woyee how comes he is blind?

Yep! He or she is young! And sick or having a disability! It sucks. But sickness and chronic illness isn’t exclusively the domain of the elderly; people of all ages can get sick. The society needs to understand that Doesn’t
make their experiences less valid, or their identities abnormal. They just sick in a cool young person way, I guess. I don’t know – it’s a weird thing to
say, so just don’t.

‘If you stopped talking about it all the time and looked on the bright side, you’d feel better.’

I do! To be totally frank, as a blind fellow if I didn’t look on the optimistic side, I wouldn’t be alive right now. Being blind for 23 years now it’s not a walk in the park.
It takes strong will to be in this unjust society.
This also applies to other fellow disabled persons.
Needless to say,
Being chronically ill is also tough as hell, and many chronic
illnesses have strong ties to mental illness. One has to look on the bright side A LOT, otherwise their depression and just the daily battle of being sick
would drag one down and some can’t be able to get out of their beds.

All in all, people should be able to talk about their lived experience as much as they deem appropriate, and disability and chronic illness is not spoken about
enough. Let them vent, let us explain, let them talk about their day!

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.

Why the disability movement in Kenya should stop crying faw

Over the years the Kenyan disabled haven’t got enough opportunities in many spheres of life.
This is because of overreliance of the old tricks and lack of change of tact in the advocacy engagement processes.
Unfortunately, it’s true, many disability private and public initiatives have taken place either as a second thought or organized by the few politically correct individuals.

So, if we know this to be true, what are we doing about it?
Most of the time Kenyans with disabilities have not grabbed the recent social, economic or political opportunities.
For instance, after the 2007 post-election violence there was no representation nor disability mainstreaming agenda in the Kofi anaan initiatives.
This scenario has been repeated once again in the building bridge initiative.
The disability
movement is not represented and right now is when the disability keyholders are trying to unmask the already cooked food.
The disability movement in Kenya forgets so easily if you were not on the table in preparation of meal.
You don’t have manors to demand for the cake.
It’s prudent to say the Kenyan disability sector will just get the breadcrumbs.
This is seen by upcoming mobilization of groups of disabled persons to play to the gallery even when the building bridge initiative report is yet to be made public.
The reality of the day there is not a living systematic structural engagement of disabled persons.
The barriers to public participation are either because of financial reasons or even a few individuals who have held the disability sector on ransom.
Am not surprised that currently we have an amorphous body called
Caucus on Disability Rights Advocacy.
Additionally, we still have another platform still championing on the global commitments made in July 2018.
All of these platforms still have the same individuals and agencies.
Does the common Wanjiku with disability aware of these platforms?
Is the voice of rural disability hard in these forums?
What are the tangible benefits to the change of the implementation of legal or policy frameworks?
What are other alternatives to ensure real and proper public participation and engagement of many disabled persons can be achieved rather than the few elites in the disability movement?
I opine that in article 2 of the constitution of citizen participation and article 54 should be made a reality and mandatory.
Moreover, the movement needs emancipation from the tired narratives and demand what is rightful.
For example, why do the mentioned platforms do not engage in the recent happenings as reported in the media like how children with disabilities were mistreated.

Why has the disability movement kept mum on the gazettements done by government of Kenya?
The jury is out there!
This is evidenced by below article.
http://www.mugambipaul.com/2019/09/03/why-the-disabled-kenyan-man-missed-the-land-comission-job/land
The young and vibrant individuals with disabilities have a role to play.
Do not mind the lack of mentorship in the sector.
Rise up and contribute to the transformation.
Through this the youth can reduce social media lamentations.
Research shows 80% of disabled are between the ages of 18 and 64 – the workforce age.
This can have creative and innovative outcomes for the disability movement.
Additionally, the legal processes in Kenya have not favoured the disability sector.
As penned in my past articles we should await 2021 to have the repeal of the 2003 persons with disability act.
Moreover, we still have the 2006 disability policy still in draft form.
Does that sound an alarm?
Historically in Africa Kenya is admired for having best practises in disability sector but this tale is being overtaken by Rwanda and other African countries.
For instance, Kenya disability sector has been agitating for improved accessible public transport.
This hasn’t taken place and now Rwanda is boasting of implementing accessible transport by acquisition of accessible buses and subsidized fairs for disabled persons.

What more can be done?
It’s been my experience that disability sector wants to be seen as benevolent, accepting of all disabilities, and up to date in compliance. The reality is that
many don’t want to bother as long as their image is intact.
As illustrated in many forums organized by the disability sector and non-disability sector members, they don’t provide alternative formats of information or observance of reasonable accommodation.
If the disability sector made it mandatory to preach water and Drink water, I believe things will not be the same for future disability generations.
As a public scholar and a person with lived experience of being disabled.
I have a dream that one day the sector will stand tall and read declaration.
“We the disabled of Kenya from across our great Country;
Recognising the sovereignty of the Constitution of Kenya and of the great people of Kenya, 15 % of the Kenyan largest population.
Appreciating that the Constitution of Kenya is the consensus document that reflects the ‘voice of the People of Kenya’ and has ring-fenced and protected Clauses for all including disabled and other marginalized groups through various provisions.”
We express our disappointment in the lack of leadership and strong commitment by the duty bearers to ensure the implementation of the article 54 provisions.
We therefore have the following Irreducible Minimum

————

I passionately believe that If Kenyans with disabilities think everybody has value, everybody can be capable, and no one should be excluded. I make an appeal go and Tell your CEOs, board of directors in the disability sector and allies of the disability movement to join and rise to the occasion and change tact.
Why should the disability movement be singing to the second fiddle?

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Why the Kenya Revenue Authority should partake responsibility of tax exemption for the disabled Kenyans!

During the past 3 decades in Kenya there have been numerous changes in our society with respect to the management and treatment of people with disabilities.
Of course, there ar numerous success stories of actual improved disability mainstreaming.
How did the changes occur?
Many legislative and societal changes have taken place for instance, the disability act of 2003, the UNCRPD 2006 and the 2010 constitution and several disability related regulations. Furthermore, these gains have been necessitated by the lobbing and advocacy by disabled persons and their organizations.
On the other hand, Disability mainstreaming and work to end discrimination against disabled persons have been on both government and non-state actors’ agendas for decades. Why is disability mainstreaming still important?
Some of us feel that “everyone” in government and non-state actors who include development and human rights organisations are well aware of the issues. But the truth is that in organisations without
any explicit focus on disability mainstreaming or disability social justice, the levels of awareness for disability-based discrimination (and the need to end it) tend to be uneven.
Am not surprised by the inaccessible built environment, inaccessible information or the negative attitudes which still exist among the Kenyan society.

Efforts to promote disability equality remain limited and often isolated. Some would prefer to drop “disability” altogether, busy as they feel with all those other
issues that must be “mainstreamed” – good governance, environmental protection, HIV/AIDS prevention, “you name it!”

most government and private entities normally pass on the back when dealing with disability matters!
I opine that ignorance in the Kenyan society is very expensive for disabled persons.
Why should and institution require permission to offer disabled person a service?

As citizens we do not require permission to get a passport, when one has Malaria a disabled person doesn’t require permission.
Why does Kenya revenue authority run away from its responsibilities?
As long as one has uploaded the right documentation there is no need of putting more barrier for the disabled persons.
Why are policy makers silent on this injustice?
Most top government policy makers and stakeholders have done benchmarking of disability services in other countries and they know how good and proper systems work for the people.
Why are they not actualizing simple and impactful solutions to the disabled persons?

. But there are at least five reasons why “disability mainstreaming” must continue:
list of 5 items
1. Organisations that are committed to universal human rights have a responsibility to ensure their work respects and promotes human rights. Disabled rights
are human rights, enshrined in widely accepted international treaties as the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities UNCRPD 2006.

Any rights-based approach that neglects disabled persons rights is inadequate.

2. International movements and campaigns rally large numbers of disabled people. Disabled persons make the largest minority group in the world

if government institutions who are the planners, implementers and evaluators ignore disabled interests and needs, and refrain from
engaging disabled persons as interlocutors, collaborators and allies.
They will never get it right!
3. Many development and human rights agencies are into education and campaigning – i.e., they attempt to spread ideas around, and to mobilise others to
join them in their cause. The messages they convey, implicitly or explicitly,
influence people’s minds: research has shown that campaigning can reinforce or weaken people’s value systems – broadly speaking, what they consider to
be “good” or “bad”, “right” or “wrong”. (See for example the gender mainstreaming angle.
Hence, it is important to avoid reinforcing values that condone discrimination and other violations against disabled persons
which would be in stark contradiction with the development and human rights goals most of us defend.
The disability organizations need to take lead in voicing what needs to be don on tax related concerns.
Disabled persons should not just be raising concerns on the social media but take the demands to the Kenya revenue authority.
The Kenya revenue authority need to work along side disabled persons in order to ensure smooth and faster process is achieved.
4. disability -based violence is not only one of the most pervasive human rights violations, it also jeopardises development. For example, large numbers of disabled persons have experienced delayed service delivery due to the bureaucratic processes. For instance, delayed in tax exemption renewal, with
dire consequences for their physical well-being, their mental health and their social status. Getting tax exemption is right, but y risk their
lives because of high cost of transport, psychological wellbeing. The Kenya revenue authority should know that most disabled persons are unemployed and for those who do not get access to the service
are likely to feel abused, something is deeply wrong.
Additionally, the Kenya economy is highly affected by wastage of hours on the road.
The tax exemption should have been simplified through decentralization of Kenya revenue authority services at the county.
In other words, if the digitalization process ways actualized the staff at Kenya revenue authority would be able to automatically issue exemption certificates without delay.
The disability mainstreaming focal point person at Kenya revenue has to actualize the dreams of disabled persons by ensuring the system works beyond himself or herself.
Are there government institutions, private sectors who have been given tax relief by the Kenya revenue authority for promoting disability employment and improving access for disabled persons in Kenya?
5. In terms of efficiency, any organisation has a responsibility to serve the disable persons who need their service.
Disabled persons should not be treated as second class citizen in government services.
Siting an example in 2019 May the Kenyan government in collaboration with world bank launched the braille version of the 2030 vision which in essence non blind persons read a decade ago. Is this fair?
The Kenyan policy makers need to stop the mancantile policy process and adapt solution-oriented policy and procedures.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

am I a indigenous disabled person Retracing my roots: Author Mugambi Paul.

As I joined the cultural exchange activity during the triple A assembly in Brisbane.
Many thoughts came to my mind.
When one of the tour guides gave me one of the traditional instruments to test.
It reminded me of my indigenous roots as a disabled person.
The tour guide and fellow Australian African award team were mesmerized how I blew the wind instrument with ease.
The thoughts which were in my mind were the lack of water access in 2019 in my rural village while have seen sufficiency of water through out in may stay in Australia.
The land where they don’t have enough water sources like Kenya.
Secondly, I thought of how my community has eroded the culture activities and materials.
I resolved to start a Canberra cultural center which will defiantly bring back my indigenous culture.
I remembered I never so my grandfather whom am named after.
He died as a hero fight for the rights of the people during the colonial era.
Stories are being told of how he never entertained colonial rule.
He was a strong defender of women rights.
Could I have inherited his traits?
I sometimes run away from my passion of advocating for the rights of disabled persons, but I find myself back.
Could this be my purpose of life?
Grandpa just whisper to me!
If he was alive, I believe the Kenya gender story would have been different.
All is not lost.
We as the exposed energetic and intellectually grown up have to rise to the occasion and bring back our culture alive.
For once I thought the aboriginals are related to my indigenous culture.
As a public policy expert am now duty bound to restore the history for the sake of future generation.
Australia celebration of the indigenous cultures and the multicultural events and activities have really restored hope and faith that we can live together and enjoy every one’s cultures.
I believe other expertise is needed to initiate restoration of indigenous culture. More so I will be digging out the indigenous disability culture.
How many fellow Africans are ready to travel the unchartered roots of our cultures?
We need to tell our story no matter the decades and the distorted narratives that have prevailed.The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

The Blocks to Disability Leadership and the mercantile economy of Kenya Author Mugambi Paul

Should disability leaders give up their work?

What world you do when you are in an office and all documents are inaccessible?
What would you do if you turned up for work and you had to climb a 3-meter brick wall to get into the office?
Ask the Nyeri law courts.
What about if everyone conducted team meetings
using PowerPoint and print materials?
How would you feel if you complained and nobody seemed to care?
The Kenyan public space has basically normalized this habit.
Yet, Kenya is the signatory and has domesticated the UNCRPD.
Kenya is known worldwide to have progressive laws and policies.
Imagine if we would have at list 10 % implementation of accessibility!
Let me give an example of the normalcy which occurs daily.

Some contemporaries of mine went to work the other day.

No big deal, hey. Lots of people go to work every day.

The difference is these colleagues are disability leaders. They are well respected in their various fields and regularly lead the public conversation about
disability. They are somehow not tough people I know, allot much gets in their way.
They mostly forget to bring the cows home by not demanding what’s is rightfully and constitutionally there’s.
!
This is to say, most of the public and private conferences in Kenya are held inaccessible areas.
Mostly, the disability leaders aren’t able to transact their work obligations as expected because the workshops and business areas are normally inaccessible. Very inaccessible. Should I say even the Kenyan parliament is among the list?
A place where the largest minority or marginalized group are supposed to find solace.
Should we continue with boardroom discussion on how to make accessibility real?
Or just continue with our social media rhetoric discussions?
Should we wait for another Kibaki moment to actualize the dreams of our heroes and heroines in the disability world?
Where is the accessibility voice space?
Who should be bringing the sector in to order?
The government and human rights bodies in Kenya “hamwoni hi ni dhuluma?” What I am
particularly annoyed by isn’t the inaccessibility, well actually that does annoy me, rather I’m very annoyed that a bunch of disability leaders have continued this trend to
work expecting to perform at their usual high standard, and they are unable to do so.

Most of them can’t live the venues or have alternative mode of communication.
That’s why in Kenya we are still talking in boardrooms about accessibility.
If one day the disability leaders walked out in protest of inaccessible venues and products it will be the turning point.
Through a social media survey, I actually noted that some disabled leaders aren’t involved by public and private entities into workshops.
They are normally left out and remain in offices.
There bosses tend to claim they are stubborn when they demand for reasonable accommodation.

How many local and international conferences have taken place in Kenya and accessibility becomes an afterthought?

This is a total distress and lack of engagement.
This affirms why disabled persons are not represented in most of the forums and become last to be remembered.

How is that the answer? Should disability leaders be giving up their work, or should conferences and workplaces be more committed to ensuring accessibility?

Newsflash: accessibility isn’t an extra or a nice thing to have, its mandatory if you want disabled people in the room. If you think diversity is of any
value at all then accessibility is part of your regular processes, it’s just how you operate. You budget for it, make it happen, build it in from the outset.
You choose venues that work, and make sure there are rapid responses to any issues that arise. You don’t argue and able plain and put the onus back onto
the disability leader to get less disabled, you take responsibility for making accessibility happen and you fix it quickly when it doesn’t.
which government building in Kenya is accessible for the disabled persons?
Most importantly, you make sure the people designing the access are those who know about access and have professional experience in accessibility.
This means they will also be disabled people. These access experts should be paid for their work, just like your sound technicians and caterers.
Obviously, lack of recognition of disabled experts has been normalized by the system, which we need to break.
and that makes it unusual. Most incidents of inaccessibility happen to individuals, often in workplaces that aren’t supportive or have managers who think
they know better, or they are single barriers affecting individuals at offices, seminars rather than everyone, so we never hear about them.
Mostly when organizers realize their mistake.
They normally result in a formal apology during the final plenary. Unfortunately, most of the disability leaders accept and move on.
Additionally, most apologies do not include a commitment to recruit disabled people onto the organising committee in the
future, nor did they include a reference to the same situation happening at the previous conference and this incident being a repeat.

There are still significant barriers to disability leadership.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

OFF MY CHEST: What dating with a disability is really like Guest Author Nicole Mballah

In a world that’s technically built for the able bodied, dating as a differently abled person is doubly hard.
Trust me; I’ve had my fair share of troubles finding love.
Physical limitations are a part of a disabled person’s life, facing countless barriers every day.
We often have a routine to make things easier. When it comes to dating, minor things can require major planning and preparation.
Usually these are the questions that follow suit; where do we get an appropriate taxi? Does the building have an elevator? Does the restaurant have a ramp?
Is it too noisy or crowded to move around freely? All these things and more have to be taken into account.
But it’s not all gloom. I once went on a memorable date with this guy where not once did it fell like my disability played a part or affected him. We were just two people genuinely having a good time talking and hanging out. My disability was not a topic of conversation the whole night; I was simply a woman he was interested in.
BIGGEST OBSTACLE
In my opinion, the biggest obstacle to dating is social perceptions; I always find that people think that those of us living with a disability are either asexual or ‘undateable’.
People often think about how our disability will inconvenience them, rather than trying to consider if the relationship will work. I wish people knew that we‘re like everyone, with just a few barriers.
I’ve done my fair share of online dating and while it was fun at times, I’ve also experienced rejection.
I always try to be upfront about my disability, sometimes disclosing it on my dating profile and including a picture with my crutches into the mix.
In the words of pop singer Anne Marie:
“Love every single part of my body, top to the bottom. I’m not a super model from a magazine, I’m okay with not being perfect cause that’s perfect to me.”
My dating life has been bitter sweet. I sometimes meet men who are uncomfortable with my disability, stopping conversations once they find out or having to answer strange questions about having a disability, like ‘Can you have sex?’ and the outright weird that go ‘You’re too pretty to be disabled’, to potential dates who thought it was weird if they liked me.
While also meeting guys who accepted my disability, assisting me whenever I needed it, simply moving chairs out of the way at restaurants, just being helpful without it being too much.
Even if those dates didn’t turn out to be long term relationships I learnt valuable lessons, for every person that rejected me for my disability there was a person who didn’t.
If you reject someone with a disability, you might be forgetting that we all might have a disability in some way, it might not be visible so don’t assume to be superior.
Dating with a disability is always a challenge, whether it’s online or going on a blind date.
Don’t be afraid to make a connection. There is no correct way to do it. Don’t let the rejections get you down that’s just a part of life.
If you’re honest about who you are and what you want; there is always a door full of possibilities waiting to be opened.

Why the disabled in Kenya should stop reading lamentation Author Mugambi Paul.

Generally speaking, Kenya is facing deteriorating standards an alarming trend and of service delivery to persons with disabilities.
Of course, Recently, there has been lots of reports of rights violations of disabled and more so among girls and women with disabilities. Some of the atrocities have ranged from rape, inflicting gross bodily harm, to murder.
Noticeably, Disabled persons organizations and social media users have broadcasted the information.
What next?
Another example is a case of
a lady 20 years, made National News after she gave birth at Uhuru Park. The previous night having been kicked out of her lodging in Muthurwa for failing to pay half US dollar. She could not even afford a tenth of a US dollar to use a public toilet when she resorted to be at the park and there, she had her baby. All heathy as the dailies in Kenya reported.
How did we find ourselves here?
For how long shall we have the broken system in place?
Disability policy makers should have an ardent call to adjust their belts and raise the alarm.
This is by fastening the legislative agenda and pushing for real implementation and oversight of the current laws.
Additionally, in our pursuit to champion for the rights and equalization of opportunities for persons with disabilities, ensuring their safety in the society
must always take predominate position.
This is well articulated in the ]UNCRPD 2006[which Kenya has signed and ratified.
Historically, I can vividly remember the great promises that successive governments have made since I was newcomer in the movement. Thus far we are still advocating for the same. For instance, we were told in the early 2000 inaccessible of buildings will be a thing of the past.
Yet many infrastructure projects still do not observe the standards even after the gazettement 2015.
theoretically speaking Kenya has great policies but poor implementation.
This is not to say attempts have not been done to save the situation.

However, it seems the government and the disability policy makers are still engaging in pull and push game.
Why aren’t we represented in the building bridge initiative?
Why aren’t we represented at the independent election and boundaries commission?
This clearly shows the low expectation exhibited by policy makers on the capacities of disabled persons.
Its high time the disabled persons enjoy the national cake not just to take the crumps
Should the disability policy makers change tact?
I observe that during 2018 global London summit Kenya marketed itself as a leader on disability mainstreaming and inclusion.
Nevertheless, the top brass leadership din’t take the lead like the UK counterpart.

Observers expected the Kenyan presidency to take the lead.
It is imperative that the disabled persons and policy stakeholders stands firm and retrieve the lost glory and dreams of the founders of the disability movement in Kenya.
In most developed nations there is a cabinet secretary assigned to handle the exclusively the disability docket.
The latest entrant is Australia.
Where the Liberal MP Stuart Robert will enter cabinet as the minister for the NDIS after the scheme was taken out of the social services portfolio.

Should the disability sector be moved to the presidency?
The jury is out there.
Should the policy makers become innovative and engage more disabled persons?

Apparently, the lack of factual information among the disabled population leads to misinformation and low demand of actual rights.
Furthermore, most decision makers are based in the Nairobi city thus lack of involvement of the rural disability sector.
Most Kenyan policy makers use top bottom approach in decision making.
Moreover, the lack of economic resource has made disabled persons to be vulnerable.
Thus, often taken advantage of.
This is by either accepting to receive poor services or suffer in silence.
Its high time disabled persons in Kenya stopped lamentation.
The focus should be on self-advocacy and knowing the rights.
As individuals and institutions, we all are aware of the barrier’s persons with disabilities face.
They include lack of support systems in place. Poor resourced government services. Lack of representation in the workforce, private sector, low literacy rates among disabled persons,
Inaccessible building and infrastructure.
Lastly,
Low legislative agendas among parliamentarians with disabilities. Etc.
Kenya is arguably, the most unequal society.
According to world bank report 2018 43.6 of persons in Kenya live below the poverty line.
Obviously, disabled persons are triple affected.
It is high time we restored dignity and decency among disabled persons.
One way is by adopting universal basic income to all persons with disabilities.
This will promote economic independence among the largest minority group in Kenya.
This is because it will be a game changer by restoration of dignity on lives of disabled persons.
instead of the current cash transfer system which targets a few individuals with severe disabilities.
As a scholar I believe Inclusion of people with disabilities creates a strong economy by enabling a diverse community contribution which drives future growth.
Why do we have well written policies with poor implementations?
This can happen when disabled persons realize that it’s not the disabled leaders who are the problem.
The problem is individual disabled persons who doesn’t want to take responsibility of self-advocacy and engaging in systematic advocacy.
Of course, This is what the disability leadership has taken advantage of.
The disability leadership knows that the true liberation of disabled community will happen when many more self-advocates have taken their positions
Meanwhile the disabled persons organizations have to live to the promise of transparency and accountability in order to be the real watchdog of government institutions serving persons with disabilities.
This agenda should start among the disabled persons organization membership and structures.
Additionally, the legislators with disabilities have to change by living to the call of being leaders.
Being a leader calls for constant interaction with the disabled people. Listening to the citizens forms the basis of representation and legislation.
This will aid the parliamentarians to lobby and advocate for economically viable legislations to reduce the economic inequalities experienced by 99 % of the disability population in Kenya.
Together we can create new opportunities for inclusive economic growth with benefits for everyone in the community, as well as the person with disability, who may become a customer, client, employee, student, team member or holidaymaker at your organisation, sports club, business, shop, restaurant or rental property.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Scientists Discover How Blind People Know So Much About Appearances guest author Sarah Sloat

The philosopher John Locke, who believed that true knowledge of the world could only stem from sensory experiences, thought that blind individuals could never understand the concepts of light and color. Locke, it turns out, was wrong. In a recent PNAS study, blind people demonstrate that they do understand what sighted people process through vision, proving that “visual” ideas don’t actually require sight.
In the study published Tuesday, scientists demonstrated how blind people make visual sense of what they cannot see. While previous studies suggested that the most efficient way for a blind person to know that, say, a flamingo is pink, is to memorize that fact, this study demonstrates that blind people instead look at the world like scientists and make sense of the visual world through a catalogue of clues.
“First-person experience isn’t the only way to develop a rich understanding of the world around us,” co-author and Johns Hopkins doctoral candidate Judy Kim explains. “People often have the intuition that we can’t know what we can’t see.”
This intuition is wrong, as Kim and her colleagues showed by testing 20 blind and 20 sighted adults, all around 30 years old, about their knowledge of animal appearances. The participants were asked to order a variety of animals by size and height and to sort the animals into groups based on shape, skin texture, and color. They were also presented with a group of animals and asked which one was not like the others.
The study design.
In most cases, the sighted and blind people performed equally well on the test. They sorted the animals in predominantly the same way, and both agreed on which physical features comprised the predominant description of each group of animals. For example, both blind and sighted people described dolphins and sharks to be of similar shape.
What the two groups disagreed about the most was, strangely, the factor that the researchers hypothesized would be the most agreed upon: Color. Sighted participants sometimes had trouble describing the shape of an animal, but they always readily provided its color. Blind people did not. This outcome refuted the “learn-by-description” hypothesis, which posits that blind people learn about objects by hearing the way other people describe them. If this were the case, then the blind participants should have been able to identify color easily, since sighted people seem to always include color in their descriptions.
But color is what blind individuals were least able to identify. And so, the researchers argue that the “learn-by-description” hypothesis must be incorrect and that blind people must gather visual information in a different way: By deducing it from existing knowledge about an object and details related to it.
“In the absence of direct sensory access, knowledge of appearance is acquired primarily through interface, rather than through memorization of verbally stipulated facts,” the scientists write.
How would you describe “pink” without having seen pink?
In other words, blind people take the scientific approach and infer appearances through other properties like taxonomy and habitat. This strategy works well for features like shape and textures; for example, birds have feathers and wings, so it’s implied that this holds true across bird species. Color is less easy to infer. Since there are a lot of animals that are the same color, it’s hard to deduce that, say, bears and ravens are black, based on the other things you know about animals.
But color inaccuracies aside, the research proves what blind people already know: You can have a rich and accurate sense of the world without actually seeing it.
And sometimes, the approach blind people take actually helps them be more accurate. Here, 55 percent of the blind participants and 20 percent of the sighted participants said that sharks have scales; the majority of that group said they have skin. In reality, sharks have fine scales — they are just difficult to see.
Abstract:
How does first-person sensory experience contribute to knowledge? Contrary to the suppositions of early empiricist philosophers, people who are born blind know about phenomena that cannot be perceived directly, such as color and light. Exactly what is learned and how remains an open question. We compared knowledge of animal appearance across congenitally blind (n = 20) and sighted individuals (two groups, n = 20 and n = 35) using a battery of tasks, including ordering (size and height), sorting (shape, skin texture, and color), odd-one-out (shape), and feature choice (texture). On all tested dimensions apart from color, sighted and blind individuals showed substantial albeit imperfect agreement, suggesting that linguistic communication and visual perception convey partially redundant appearance information. To test the hypothesis that blind individuals learn about appearance primarily by remembering sighted people’s descriptions of what they see (e.g., “elephants are gray”), we measured verbalizability of animal shape, texture, and color in the sighted. Contrary to the learn-from-description hypothesis, blind and sighted groups disagreed most about the appearance dimension that was easiest for sighted people to verbalize: color. Analysis of disagreement patterns across all tasks suggest that blind individuals infer physical features from non-appearance properties of animals such as folk taxonomy and habitat (e.g., bats are textured like mammals but shaped like birds). These findings suggest that in the absence of sensory access, structured appearance knowledge is acquired through inference from ontological kind.

The two Sleeping blind giants in Kenya: author Mugambi Paul

Reading the annual general meeting invite by the Kenya society for the blind gives a familiar script.
The process and conduct of doing things seem to be usual.
No logical or pragmatic turnaround of event.
The Kenya Society for the Blind is a statutory charitable organization established in 1956 by an Act of Parliament this institution is meant to guide, offer technical support to matters Blindness and vision impaired to the government and stakeholders.
Has Kenya society for the Blind lived to its promises envisaged in the 1956 at?
What is the role of government in ensuring the Blind and vision impaired persons live to exploit their potentials?
Did the government escape duty and obligation to the blind and vision impaired persons?
When shall we have the updated Kenya society for the blind act to meet the current issues faced by the blind and vision impaired persons?
The act needs to be aligned with the Kenyan constitution 2010, UNCRPD, Public ethics act and public participations act.

This is not to say that nothing is happening.
As a matter of fact,
Kenya society for the blind has held several charity activities geared towards education of the blind pupils.
Additionally, there are many grey areas on matters Blindness and vision impairment in Kenya.
Its either the Kenya Blindness sector has decided to be dormant or the system has refused to change.
For instance, in matters governance even with known lawyers we aren’t able to differentiate the roles played by board members and staff.
This is totally uncalled for and review needs to be done urgently.

This seems to be a common practice among the disabled persons organization in
Kenya. With this notwithstanding, in matters programming several issues can be raised.
What are the pros and cons of having car garages in the premises?
How many blind and vision impaired persons have gainfully been absorbed by the new ventures?

Several studies and social media posts have continuously demonstrated this behavior.

https://m.facebook.com/groups/782290015159886?view=permalink&id=1860411574014386&refid=46&__xts__%5B0%5D=12.%7B%22unit_id_click_type%22%3A%22graph_search_results_item_tapped%22%2C%22click_type%22%3A%22result%22%2C%22module_id%22%3A8%2C%22result_id%22%3A%22100000309023349%3A1860411574014386%22%2C%22session_id%22%3A%2294af8b3a8130b8cd80ffb146320fa7d7%22%2C%22module_role%22%3A%22FEED_POSTS%22%2C%22unit_id%22%3A%22browse_rl%3Abab2c8d9-58c6-03bb-6970-555f4984237d%22%2C%22browse_result_type%22%3A%22browse_type_story%22%2C%22unit_id_result_id%22%3A1860411574014386%2C%22module_result_position%22%3A0%2C%22result_creation_time%22%3A1539597936%7D&__tn__=%2As
secondly on face value the Kenya union of the blind is supposed to be the voice of blind and vision impaired in Kenya.
theoretically, Kenya union of the blind is mandated to be bold and grant the self and systemic advocacy initiatives among the blind and vision impaired persons.
It’s an institution where the blind and vision impaired persons can be able to become self-advocate.
It is also a platform
For engagement with government and stakeholders.
Can we claim the blind and vision impaired persons are self-advocates?
Is there a mentorship and leadership practice?
Where is the status implementation of marekesh treaty??
In matters governance Kenya union of the blind stand to be condemned for its status.
Am not surprised that the largest blindness organization in Kenya has the same chairperson for the last 30 years.

To make the matters worse
The chairperson was appointed as a commissioner in a state organ which is also supposed to play an oversight role on disability matters in the country.
This is a true example of conflict of public interests!
This discussion is held in low tones in the disability sector.
Am not flabbergasted when the Kenyan blindness sector has not experienced significant reforms for its current and future generations.
The barriers faced by blind and vision impaired persons have been compounded by the sleeping advocacy organ.
It seems the mediocre practises are in the Kenyan DNA.
Several researches have shown how many blind and vision impaired persons have low esteem combined with the restrictive environment they have lived.
This affirms why most individuals with disabilities are not able to advocate for themselves.
On the other hand, the disabled persons who seem to advocate for themselves are treated as riles or individuals who are outcasts.
Its high time the Kenyan blindness sector arose from slumbered and demonstrate with collective and unifying voice life will be better for present and future generation of the Blind and vision impaired persons. A clarion call is be stalled upon individuals to show the light.
As Martin Niemöller a prominent Lutheran pastor in reference to the Nazi regime, once said;
“First, they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out; because I was not a socialist. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out; because I was not a trade unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out; because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me, and there was no one left to speak for me.”

Furthermore, there has been rise of new entrants in the Kenyan blindness sector.
In other words, the new kids on the block in the blindness and vision impaired sector need to take lessons from the 2 sleeping giants.
This will aid effective engagement and bring the blind and vision impaired persons to their rightful place.
The Kenyan government needs to establish an oversight agency to ensure the Blind and vision impaired persons do not become vulnerable under this circumstance.
Its clearly known that there are no support mechanisms in place to support blind and vision impaired persons.
The 98 % of the blind and vision impaired individuals are just survivors in Kenya.

some recommendations to the Kenya society for the blind and Kenya union of the blind.
1. Put the house in order by reviewing the ACT of 1956. By public participation and engaging policy makers.
2. Review the governance and regulation policies.
3. Conduct a self-surgery before the reforms take place. To demonstrate this, we Kenya used to have telephone booths later on Mobile took over. We used to have tined cooking oil now we have rapped and plastic cooking oils.to bring matters to perspective, Kenya society for the Blind used to advocate for persons with albinism. Things changed drastically and now persons with albinism left the Blind and vision impaired wagon for better tides.
All in all, the future is bright for the blind and vision impaired persons.
As a public policy scholar on diversity and inclusion I will strive to contribute by rearing many more disabled persons to be their own best advocate
I have recognized that as a blind person, if you know the laws and understand your rights you are the most authentic spokesperson for yourself. Thus, much of my work is now cut out
It doesn’t matter the time, but we are heading there.
Advocacy is one of the most important reasons for me to connect with disabled people and their families. When I do, I will teach them that they are not alone,
I will empower them with the tools to raise their own expectations, and I will connect them with an unparalleled network that will be a lifelong resource for them
to continue to be strong advocates for themselves.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Living with low vision Advocacy Story

At a recent low vision group meeting I attended a woman came and spoke with us about self advocacy. What made her talk so interesting and unique is that
instead of providing specific tips or talking legalese she told her story. As she talked it occurred to me that we all have an advocacy story of our own
to tell. Here’s mine.

I learned how to advocate from my parents. When they were told that I would be taught Braille because I am blind my Mom and Dad insisted that it was
important for me to learn how to read print first. Because of their persistence I am able to read large print today. That was the right choice at the
time however, I will say this, if my parents had encouraged me I might have decided to try reading Braille at an earlier age.

I wish I could say that as I grew into a teenager I was less stubborn and more thoughtful regarding my needs and wants. But sometimes what we want isn’t
what we need. When I turned 13 my mobility instructor decided it was time for me to acquire my first cane. I hated it. I didn’t want my friends to see
me using it and I didn’t think my vision was bad enough to need it. Of course this meant I began advocating to the detriment of myself. My instructor realizing
this knew there was only one solution. Let me learn the hard way. So she scheduled a night lesson and told me I could decide whether or not to bring
my cane. Of course I chose not to. The lesson did not go well and my instructor was impatient and angry. But it was because of that night I was able
to grudgingly accept using that cane for travel after dark.

When I graduated from High School I really wanted to attend college and become a teacher or journalist. The state of PA had other ideas. They wanted
to fit me into their little mold which at that time meant I’d either work in a sheltered workshop or I’d be sent away to become a vending stand operator.
Those were the only options I was given. Not being satisfied and expressing my displeasure I began my own crusade to find work. Because I didn’t let
those in charge of the money tell me how they wanted me to live my life I was able to work in a variety of jobs within the disability community. Most
of these jobs involved me teaching or writing in some form or other. I was even fortunate enough to provide peer support to some individuals along the
way.

When most people hear the word advocacy they probably think about demonstrating or trying to be heard above everyone else. Self advocacy isn’t always
that way. Sometimes it’s assessing the situation you find yourself in, learning all you can about your various options, then making a decision and sticking
to it as I did regarding employment.

Now I face my greatest challenge yet. Since I have a hidden disability it is more important than ever that I self advocate. People don’t understand my
sensory over load issues and attempting to explain them is sometimes interesting. For instance when I tell someone that the fire siren or vacuum cleaner
is too loud they always want to point out that I must have more sensitive hearing because I am blind and that they understand it must be louder for me
then for them. What they don’t realize is that it isn’t the volume, tone, or pitch of the sound it is how my brain is processing it. It is the same with
my other senses. I’m learning to speak up in a new way. I have to alert people when I need to change my environment to accommodate my needs.

When I’m faced with a major life decision I do a lot of research to determine all of my options. Then make a pro and con list to help decide which option
is best. I stick to my decision. Family and friends mean well but I am the one who has to live with the results of my choices. I speak up if I need
help. I don’t assume those around me will know what my needs are.

I hope sharing my story and strategies will inspire you to advocate for something you may need or want in your life.
by Guest
Donna Williams.

Why the Kenyan Disability sector is yet to celebrate Uhuru in 2019: Author Mugambi M. Paul.

Why the Kenyan Disability sector is yet to CELEBRATE Uhuru in 2019:
Author Mugambi M. Paul.

The third eye on Disability policy implementation in Kenya 2019
In recent past, Kenya has been a global leader in developing and advocating for better disability policy framework. This is well articulated on the contributions made to the African disability policy framework, UNCRPD resolutions etc
Yet much is to be achieved in local policy development and implementation.
background:

In a chronology of events demonstrates that it has not been an easy ride for Kenyans with disabilities.
This is because the enactment of the
persons with disability act 2003 took place after the 3rd president was involved in a grisly road accident and took oath of office on a wheelchair.
Furthermore, the Kenyan disability policy has ever remained in draft formats.

All these indicators show It has been a tumultuous journey to have a repeal of the act or even actually develop a strategy of ensuring the realization of the rights of disabled persons in Kenya.

Actually, more than 20 versions of the amendment bills have been put across for the last 14 years.
This is not to say some sort of change has not taken place though it’s a snail pace.
, some piecemeal amendments have been achieved.
For instance, the sign language recognition.
With this notwithstanding, several questions policy makers have to ask themselves.
Who will actualize the implementation of beautiful disability global policies in Kenya?
When will persons with disabilities in Kenya receive and access services without overburdening them? when will the Wanjiku with disabilities stop facing surmountable of challenges in accessing services?

Short term reforms
Some of the actions taken after advocacy include:
Development of
action plan on accessibility 2015
gazettement of adjustment orders, participation on Kenya report on the implementation of UNCRPD 2015etc.
Additionally, in 2018 the ministry of labour has an interagency implementation of the resolution of the global summit held in London 2018

All these actions by the different policy makers are aimed at creating a more inclusive society that enables Kenyans with disability to fulfil their potential as equal citizens.
It is also the main way Kenya implements the United Nations
Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Kenya, making sure people with disability can participate in all areas of Kenyan life.
As a public scholar I suggest the interagency organ of the ministry of labour develops a strategy which can address the existing gaps for policy implementation and enactment of 2020 disability act. It will be a great relive for many persons with disabilities.
If the interagency is offered the necessary resources and support, it can have development of a long-term strategic plan which can become a shared commitment by national and county government to work together to improve the lives of Kenyans with disability.
The interagency can guide governments and
other organisations to build the wellbeing of people with disability and their care givers.
Through this process the Ministry of labour and parliamentary committee can ensure the budgeting processes are disability inclusive.

There has been a lot of change to disability policy and service delivery since the enactment of 2003 act.
Some findings from disability researchers, bloggers and experience faced by persons with disabilities have established that the current act has lots of gravy areas.
This is because of systemic failures, lack of execution and resource allocation.
It’s prudent that ministry of labour and the stakeholders bite the bull by its horn by coming up with a long term 10-year disability strategy for Kenya which can be reviewed after five years.

Consequently, we need to make sure a new strategy reflects the changing policy environment and builds on opportunities available today as well as what may emerge over
the next decade, this includes considering the findings from KNCr reports the recent UNCRpd reports,
.
Public participation

constitutionally speaking the parliamentary committee, the ministry of labour should adopt public participation models which will enable persons with disabilities to contribute to the new strategies as a way forward.

This will ensure Consultation people with disability are at the centre of the design of the new strategy and have a leading role in modernising policies and
programs affecting their lives.
The needs to be a clear timeline of the consultation.
The policy makers need to adopt range of options available to ensure that persons with disabilities to have a say.
Importantly, all consultation should be accessible to people will disability.
This can be through the following:

list of 3 items
• an open public survey
Since some part of the population are able to access internet and more so the social media.

• face-to-face community workshops in every county
Media awareness.
• and online forum
The ministry of labour and the stakeholders should ensure that at all times.
The Consultations should be accessible.
This is by ensuring when registering persons with disabilities
provide details of any adjustments or special requirements they might need
key responsibilities:

Obviously, nominated parliamentarians with disabilities need to rise to the occasion and speak with one voice.
Its high time they realized disability is a cross cutting issue and doesn’t know the party lines.
They need to be accountable to persons with disabilities. At all cost.
The parliamentarians with disabilities need to think outside the box and develop bills targeting different aspects on disability not just targeting the reappeal of the 2003 persons with disabilities. For example, enactment of a carers act, braille and access to adaptive technology act, mental health act etc
We have evidently not seen the top law makers with disabilities drumming support for Legislation and policies underpinned by data disaggregated by disability which can make a difference by promoting meaningful
leadership, and consistently challenging harmful attitudes and practices.
.
For instance, the much hyped Huduma number and the upcoming census.
As policy expert I also orate that the disability persons organization are not playing their rightful role efficiently.
This is to say that an alternative view for better advocacy needs to be realized.
This is through continues research, surveys and serious consultations among membership.
Its true that most disability persons organizations have restricted themselves to Urban townships when consulting with out reaching out to the rural remote areas where even basic service to a Kenyan with disability are situated.
e
Conclusion

I believe that its high time the disability persons organization developed a serious advocacy framework with all organizations that care about the human rights and wellbeing of people with disability.
The human rights bodies and agencies need to be speaking up about the broader systemic issues that
need to be confronted, to ensure that people with a disability can have a good life.
going forward, it is not just the responsibility of the disability sector to make sure people with disability were included in the
community.
as Richardson a disability advocate says,
“This is about whole of community, and whole of government working through how best to include and embrace people with disability in all aspects of life,”

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization. Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Kenyan budgeting is a failure without urgent intervention on Disability agenda. Author: Mugambi M. Paul.

Kenyan budgeting is a failure without urgent intervention on Disability agenda.
Author: Mugambi M. Paul.

To begin, as a follow up of lasts years global summit held in London.
The ministry of labor and stakeholders have started the process of ensuring the global summit commitments are implemented.
This is evidently seen by the upcoming report by development pathways and agency in UK on matters social protection.
However, taking a snapshot of the Kenyan budgeting processes and procedures this dream might not be realized.
This is because Its just 2 months towards the presentation of budget by the treasury.
Persons with disabilities have not gotten the opportunity to participate and be engaged in the budgeting processes.
As a public scholar I affirm that Kenya government will remain to fail the disability community by not fixing this abnormally.
The Kenyan government can ensure proper disability budgeting procedures are implemented in all its plans, policies and regulations.
The Kenyan government should at list plan for one % of its budget on disability matters.
This will ensure the social protection systems become disability-inclusive.
Through the ministry of labor, they can present a memorandum of understanding to the ministry of treasury and the parliamentary budgeting committee.
This should be executed by both national and county governments.
On the other hand, persons with disabilities need to claim their public spaces.
This will enable enhancement of participation and increase of there voices being hard by policy makers.
This can take place in the local chapters of budgeting review processes.
It’s a proven fact that the bottom to top approach has necessitated lots of changes in the public sector agenda making processes.
For this to be well articulated the disability persons organizations need to up their game.
This is by mobilizing resources towards a budget campaign
Through media and engaging the parliamentary committees.
campaign in the lead-up to the reading Budget to call on the government and opposition to deliver on their bipartisan promise to actualize the disability mainstreaming agenda a reality.
All in all, when disability budgeting is implemented it will ensure Kenya moves out of the current charity model of delivery of services thus realizing the social reformative agenda.
This is well articulated in the 2010 constitution and the UNCRPD
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Twelve Crimes of being disabled in Kenya Author: Paul M. Mugambi.

Twelve Crimes of being disabled in Kenya
Author: Paul M. Mugambi.

Twelve Crimes of being disabled in Kenya
Author: Paul M. Mugambi.

1. Only in Kenya where most government documents are written “physically challenged” in reference to persons with disabilities.
2. Only in Kenya both Government and private sector demand for a driving lisence even when they know Blind and Deaf-Blind persons will never drive on the Kenyan roads. Thus, denial of employment opportunity.
3. Only in Kenya we pay for the long and dreary processes of acquiring the disabled card while the national identity card is readily available and its free.
4.
Only in Kenya where government service providers one has to explain his or her disability before service is offered or denied. I wonder if other non-disabled citizens undergo this trauma.
5. Only in Kenya where Kenya revenue Authority demands renewal of tax exemption certificates to the disabled persons as if the permanent disabled persons got a miracle. You wonder why Kenya claims to be an IT herb while the KRA system can’t just update itself.
6. Only in Kenya where the invisible disabled persons are not recognized and lots of explanation is done.
7. Only in Kenya persons with disabilities have to organize themselves to educate service providers of their roles and responsibilities in service delivery to disabled persons.
8. Only in Kenya where most government offices are either inaccessible or located in inaccessible places.
9. Only in Kenya most government websites are in accessible and do not offer alternative formats in documentation.
10. Only in Kenya where most public and private adverts are written “Persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply” but they don’t take any extra measure to ensure disabled persons are brought on board.
11. Only in Kenya where disabled persons pay for the “disabled car sticker” for packing and even the disabled packing is already occupied by the non-disabled individuals.
12. Only in Kenya where disabled artists, musicians, sportspersons beg for government or private sector sponsorship to participate in both local and international events and obligations.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Paul Mugambi is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.