What James Macharia and the building industry need to know about housing for all Author Mugambi Paul

What James Macharia
and the building industry need to know about housing for all

When CS of transport and infrastructure James Macharia grabbed headlines, last week claiming to implement the 1.5 % housing levy. Several questions came to my mind as a public policy expert on diversity and inclusion.
Will the housing plans be accessible, how many persons with disabilities will benefit from the scheme? No regulations regarding accessible housing have been put across.

, it showed a clear lack of awareness about the situation facing people who need accessible housing.
A quick and random call among persons with disabilities soon clarified that accessible housing is a rare commodity in Kenya.
Housing finance and real estates in Kenya have not taken any concrete measure to ensure even at list wheelchair accessible houses.
A negligible
Number of persons with disabilities have modified and customise an existing home if they need accessibility features.
Homes in the area are often high-set, or have stairs to the entries, or might have a feature like a sunken lounge.
I opine that It’s all about the space inside, and whether it is possible to navigate it easily.
When policy implementors put in mind the accessible needs, they aren’t doing for persons with disabilities but it’s for all. this is because the accessibility features will help in future. policy implementors need to plan for mobility-friendly home for
present and future occurrences. Some suggestions include:

As well as a level path to the entry, step-free entry and wide doorway, they look for features like a place under cover outside or inside near the front door to park and charge an electric mobility scooter. This is also not always easy to find in homes on the market.
Sadly, the situation in Dickson is not abnormal
But Nairobi is not unusual in having a dearth of dwellings suitable for those with accessibility requirements such as disability, age-related health issues, being on crutches following injury or grappling with infernal contraptions for conveying small children in and out of their property.
Nairobi is typical – and that is a major problem.
There are some moves afoot to change the way new homes are built – and more on that shortly – because the bottom line is that more inclusive and user-friendly housing that incorporates basic universal design would ensure homes work for just about anyone.
For people with disability, the lack of dwellings that meet basic Livable Housing Design Guidelines can compromise full participation in both economic and social life.
Importantly, the Kenyan disability sector has been silent on this critical concern. Notability, housing it’s one of the big 4 agenda by the president.
This shows how the disability stakeholders have not engaged sufficiency with the government and the building stakeholders.
There is lack of existing data on accessible housing and also ownership of homes by persons with disabilities.
Moreover, there are no guidelines or regulations on accessible housing nor available information on the current Kenya disability strategy.
The challenge is to policy makers to rise to the occasion and guarantee basic and accessible housing for all.
Additionally, there are specific difficulties and barriers created by the lack of affordable and appropriate housing near employment.
A lack of affordable, accessible housing directly affects employment opportunities including where a person can work, hours that they can work, access to training and promotion as well as all the social activities that come with being part of a workplace.
According to the United Nations, over three quarters of Africa’s population is under 35. Kenyan youth is over 20 per cent of the population — higher than
the world (15.8 per cent) and Africa (19.2 per cent) averages.

Kenya has the highest youth unemployment rate in East Africa. Youth inclusion into construction is imperative not only to employment security, but also to curb
the increasing social spiral into crime that unproductive and disenfranchised youth are vulnerable to.
It is prudent for policy makers and stakeholders realize that People with disability, like everyone else, need to have easy access and proximity to their places of employment.
“This includes ensuring there are strong and well-planned links between accessible housing, accessible public transport and an accessible built environment such as footpaths, premises and availability of accessible facilities such as toilets.
This is a challenge to the legislatures in both national and county governments to take the bull by its horn and ensure accessible housing policies are being developed and executed.
There are even barriers to engaging with the property market.
“Where employed or not, whether housing is being sought for purchase or in the private rental market, people with disability face numerous barriers to have our housing needs met.
“It is extremely difficult to find rental properties that are both accessible and affordable.” A blind client
Informed us. The county governments need to zero rate taxes for persons with disabilities in order to uptake ownership of property and building houses.

This is because It is also difficult to access funding and/or approval to make the necessary modifications to rental properties.
“The appalling experience by the Blind client is sadly a common experience for many people with disability.
“Many of us face difficulties in finding accessible housing in close proximity to our work and we often face highly restricted choices in where we can live. The experience also highlights the poor attitudes and a lack of understanding that still exists within the community as we navigate and negotiate our way around a largely inaccessible environment.”
How far off is industry on delivering accessible housing for all?
This is still a pipedream to attain the 500.000 houses by 2022.
I believe if the government and policy makers can have a consensus from government, property developers, and advocates for older people and people with disability for basic access features to be rolled out in all new homes by 2025.
We are likely we will get there.
The basic design features for minimum universal design features such as a level point of entry to the dwelling; step-free showers that allow for seated use and toilets in a ground floor bathroom with room to manoeuvre; wider doorways and corridor widths should have a focus of establishing a Kenyan Building Codes Board.
The board should pursue research and endeavour to produce quarterly reports on accessible housing for all.
While wheelchair users as a specific group of people with disability are a small proportion of the population, I affirm that the accessibility features are also important for people to age in place.
Social housing is not the answer for all people with disability, as there are those who have well-paid jobs. Parliamentarians with disabilities, for example, are often in full-time employment and earning incomes that allow them full independence. There are also many livings with other family members in a family home
All in all, the house building industry has not “come to the party” of its own volition on delivering universal design features as a standard product.
Hence the need for changes to the construction code to make it happen.
Real estate is generally resistant
Private Real estate are reluctant to include access features even when asked.
“If you engage an architect for a custom build then yes, you can get level access to the alfresco,” she says.
The reality is accessible housing ready to move into simply isn’t easy to find – and even when a home is accessible, there is no easy way for buyers to identify those properties.
I also take note that Many builders also see providing disability-friendly housing as a Kenyan government responsibility.
There are also an attitude older people should be moving into specifically back to the rural places not expecting the mass market to cater for their changing needs.
However, with the statistics showing that around 35 per cent of households include a person with a disability, this is a mass market need.
“That’s a big chunk of the population.”
The lack of accessible housing also impacts who can visit a dwelling. many people “just put up with it” when they realise a family member or friend cannot visit their home due to an un-navigable entry or internal features.
The lack of interest in delivering accessible housing also means there are few putting thought into design for accessibility.
Good design doesn’t mean there will be “ugly” grab bars everywhere as many people think.
“It doesn’t need to look like a person with a disability lives there.”
The reluctance to make accessible design a basic and universal part of dwellings is not an outrageous demand on the industry.
I observe that We already have so many universal features such as walls, roof and windows.
It is not a stretch from these types of universal features to making accessibility standard so that more homes are useable by more people across their lifespan.
“It’s not rocket science. [These features] are already included in many high-class homes in Kenyan surbabs. technical problems have already been overcome.”
As to the argument the accessibility features will cost more – which was a feature of the builders–Any added cost is due to the need for subtrades to change the standard practices, and in going back and undertaking re-work where they have done things in the usual “cookie cutter” fashion and failed to deliver specified universal design features.
I call it the “hump cost” – the initial adjustment required to get the industry onboard with doing things slightly differently.
Ultimately, accessibility in housing is just about “thoughtful design and useability for the maximum number of people.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Living with low vision Advocacy Story

At a recent low vision group meeting I attended a woman came and spoke with us about self advocacy. What made her talk so interesting and unique is that
instead of providing specific tips or talking legalese she told her story. As she talked it occurred to me that we all have an advocacy story of our own
to tell. Here’s mine.

I learned how to advocate from my parents. When they were told that I would be taught Braille because I am blind my Mom and Dad insisted that it was
important for me to learn how to read print first. Because of their persistence I am able to read large print today. That was the right choice at the
time however, I will say this, if my parents had encouraged me I might have decided to try reading Braille at an earlier age.

I wish I could say that as I grew into a teenager I was less stubborn and more thoughtful regarding my needs and wants. But sometimes what we want isn’t
what we need. When I turned 13 my mobility instructor decided it was time for me to acquire my first cane. I hated it. I didn’t want my friends to see
me using it and I didn’t think my vision was bad enough to need it. Of course this meant I began advocating to the detriment of myself. My instructor realizing
this knew there was only one solution. Let me learn the hard way. So she scheduled a night lesson and told me I could decide whether or not to bring
my cane. Of course I chose not to. The lesson did not go well and my instructor was impatient and angry. But it was because of that night I was able
to grudgingly accept using that cane for travel after dark.

When I graduated from High School I really wanted to attend college and become a teacher or journalist. The state of PA had other ideas. They wanted
to fit me into their little mold which at that time meant I’d either work in a sheltered workshop or I’d be sent away to become a vending stand operator.
Those were the only options I was given. Not being satisfied and expressing my displeasure I began my own crusade to find work. Because I didn’t let
those in charge of the money tell me how they wanted me to live my life I was able to work in a variety of jobs within the disability community. Most
of these jobs involved me teaching or writing in some form or other. I was even fortunate enough to provide peer support to some individuals along the
way.

When most people hear the word advocacy they probably think about demonstrating or trying to be heard above everyone else. Self advocacy isn’t always
that way. Sometimes it’s assessing the situation you find yourself in, learning all you can about your various options, then making a decision and sticking
to it as I did regarding employment.

Now I face my greatest challenge yet. Since I have a hidden disability it is more important than ever that I self advocate. People don’t understand my
sensory over load issues and attempting to explain them is sometimes interesting. For instance when I tell someone that the fire siren or vacuum cleaner
is too loud they always want to point out that I must have more sensitive hearing because I am blind and that they understand it must be louder for me
then for them. What they don’t realize is that it isn’t the volume, tone, or pitch of the sound it is how my brain is processing it. It is the same with
my other senses. I’m learning to speak up in a new way. I have to alert people when I need to change my environment to accommodate my needs.

When I’m faced with a major life decision I do a lot of research to determine all of my options. Then make a pro and con list to help decide which option
is best. I stick to my decision. Family and friends mean well but I am the one who has to live with the results of my choices. I speak up if I need
help. I don’t assume those around me will know what my needs are.

I hope sharing my story and strategies will inspire you to advocate for something you may need or want in your life.
by Guest
Donna Williams.

Why the Kenyan Disability sector is yet to celebrate Uhuru in 2019: Author Mugambi M. Paul.

Why the Kenyan Disability sector is yet to CELEBRATE Uhuru in 2019:
Author Mugambi M. Paul.

The third eye on Disability policy implementation in Kenya 2019
In recent past, Kenya has been a global leader in developing and advocating for better disability policy framework. This is well articulated on the contributions made to the African disability policy framework, UNCRPD resolutions etc
Yet much is to be achieved in local policy development and implementation.
background:

In a chronology of events demonstrates that it has not been an easy ride for Kenyans with disabilities.
This is because the enactment of the
persons with disability act 2003 took place after the 3rd president was involved in a grisly road accident and took oath of office on a wheelchair.
Furthermore, the Kenyan disability policy has ever remained in draft formats.

All these indicators show It has been a tumultuous journey to have a repeal of the act or even actually develop a strategy of ensuring the realization of the rights of disabled persons in Kenya.

Actually, more than 20 versions of the amendment bills have been put across for the last 14 years.
This is not to say some sort of change has not taken place though it’s a snail pace.
, some piecemeal amendments have been achieved.
For instance, the sign language recognition.
With this notwithstanding, several questions policy makers have to ask themselves.
Who will actualize the implementation of beautiful disability global policies in Kenya?
When will persons with disabilities in Kenya receive and access services without overburdening them? when will the Wanjiku with disabilities stop facing surmountable of challenges in accessing services?

Short term reforms
Some of the actions taken after advocacy include:
Development of
action plan on accessibility 2015
gazettement of adjustment orders, participation on Kenya report on the implementation of UNCRPD 2015etc.
Additionally, in 2018 the ministry of labour has an interagency implementation of the resolution of the global summit held in London 2018

All these actions by the different policy makers are aimed at creating a more inclusive society that enables Kenyans with disability to fulfil their potential as equal citizens.
It is also the main way Kenya implements the United Nations
Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Kenya, making sure people with disability can participate in all areas of Kenyan life.
As a public scholar I suggest the interagency organ of the ministry of labour develops a strategy which can address the existing gaps for policy implementation and enactment of 2020 disability act. It will be a great relive for many persons with disabilities.
If the interagency is offered the necessary resources and support, it can have development of a long-term strategic plan which can become a shared commitment by national and county government to work together to improve the lives of Kenyans with disability.
The interagency can guide governments and
other organisations to build the wellbeing of people with disability and their care givers.
Through this process the Ministry of labour and parliamentary committee can ensure the budgeting processes are disability inclusive.

There has been a lot of change to disability policy and service delivery since the enactment of 2003 act.
Some findings from disability researchers, bloggers and experience faced by persons with disabilities have established that the current act has lots of gravy areas.
This is because of systemic failures, lack of execution and resource allocation.
It’s prudent that ministry of labour and the stakeholders bite the bull by its horn by coming up with a long term 10-year disability strategy for Kenya which can be reviewed after five years.

Consequently, we need to make sure a new strategy reflects the changing policy environment and builds on opportunities available today as well as what may emerge over
the next decade, this includes considering the findings from KNCr reports the recent UNCRpd reports,
.
Public participation

constitutionally speaking the parliamentary committee, the ministry of labour should adopt public participation models which will enable persons with disabilities to contribute to the new strategies as a way forward.

This will ensure Consultation people with disability are at the centre of the design of the new strategy and have a leading role in modernising policies and
programs affecting their lives.
The needs to be a clear timeline of the consultation.
The policy makers need to adopt range of options available to ensure that persons with disabilities to have a say.
Importantly, all consultation should be accessible to people will disability.
This can be through the following:

list of 3 items
• an open public survey
Since some part of the population are able to access internet and more so the social media.

• face-to-face community workshops in every county
Media awareness.
• and online forum
The ministry of labour and the stakeholders should ensure that at all times.
The Consultations should be accessible.
This is by ensuring when registering persons with disabilities
provide details of any adjustments or special requirements they might need
key responsibilities:

Obviously, nominated parliamentarians with disabilities need to rise to the occasion and speak with one voice.
Its high time they realized disability is a cross cutting issue and doesn’t know the party lines.
They need to be accountable to persons with disabilities. At all cost.
The parliamentarians with disabilities need to think outside the box and develop bills targeting different aspects on disability not just targeting the reappeal of the 2003 persons with disabilities. For example, enactment of a carers act, braille and access to adaptive technology act, mental health act etc
We have evidently not seen the top law makers with disabilities drumming support for Legislation and policies underpinned by data disaggregated by disability which can make a difference by promoting meaningful
leadership, and consistently challenging harmful attitudes and practices.
.
For instance, the much hyped Huduma number and the upcoming census.
As policy expert I also orate that the disability persons organization are not playing their rightful role efficiently.
This is to say that an alternative view for better advocacy needs to be realized.
This is through continues research, surveys and serious consultations among membership.
Its true that most disability persons organizations have restricted themselves to Urban townships when consulting with out reaching out to the rural remote areas where even basic service to a Kenyan with disability are situated.
e
Conclusion

I believe that its high time the disability persons organization developed a serious advocacy framework with all organizations that care about the human rights and wellbeing of people with disability.
The human rights bodies and agencies need to be speaking up about the broader systemic issues that
need to be confronted, to ensure that people with a disability can have a good life.
going forward, it is not just the responsibility of the disability sector to make sure people with disability were included in the
community.
as Richardson a disability advocate says,
“This is about whole of community, and whole of government working through how best to include and embrace people with disability in all aspects of life,”

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization. Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Kenyan budgeting is a failure without urgent intervention on Disability agenda. Author: Mugambi M. Paul.

Kenyan budgeting is a failure without urgent intervention on Disability agenda.
Author: Mugambi M. Paul.

To begin, as a follow up of lasts years global summit held in London.
The ministry of labor and stakeholders have started the process of ensuring the global summit commitments are implemented.
This is evidently seen by the upcoming report by development pathways and agency in UK on matters social protection.
However, taking a snapshot of the Kenyan budgeting processes and procedures this dream might not be realized.
This is because Its just 2 months towards the presentation of budget by the treasury.
Persons with disabilities have not gotten the opportunity to participate and be engaged in the budgeting processes.
As a public scholar I affirm that Kenya government will remain to fail the disability community by not fixing this abnormally.
The Kenyan government can ensure proper disability budgeting procedures are implemented in all its plans, policies and regulations.
The Kenyan government should at list plan for one % of its budget on disability matters.
This will ensure the social protection systems become disability-inclusive.
Through the ministry of labor, they can present a memorandum of understanding to the ministry of treasury and the parliamentary budgeting committee.
This should be executed by both national and county governments.
On the other hand, persons with disabilities need to claim their public spaces.
This will enable enhancement of participation and increase of there voices being hard by policy makers.
This can take place in the local chapters of budgeting review processes.
It’s a proven fact that the bottom to top approach has necessitated lots of changes in the public sector agenda making processes.
For this to be well articulated the disability persons organizations need to up their game.
This is by mobilizing resources towards a budget campaign
Through media and engaging the parliamentary committees.
campaign in the lead-up to the reading Budget to call on the government and opposition to deliver on their bipartisan promise to actualize the disability mainstreaming agenda a reality.
All in all, when disability budgeting is implemented it will ensure Kenya moves out of the current charity model of delivery of services thus realizing the social reformative agenda.
This is well articulated in the 2010 constitution and the UNCRPD
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

Why the disability sector in Kenya needs a urgent transformation

Persons with disabilities in Kenya account for 15 % of the population [WHO 2011].
Yet they are the most marginalized and lack the basic services from the government.
Obviously since the independence persons with disabilities have been treated as second class citizens.
This is because of the existence of economic, social and political disparities.
on the other hand, others argue Both government and the private sector have played a critical role towards development and design of disability policies.
This is evidently seen by the persons with disability act 2003, the special needs policy 2009 draft disability policy, national accessibility action plan 2015.
All these gains are towards improving lives of persons with disabilities. Therefore, we need to have a third eye lenses to ask ourselves.
Are these policies achieving their objectives? Are persons with disabilities able to effectively participate and included in all services?
The jury is out there.
As the 47 governor’s meet in Kirinyaga for their sixth annual conference in March 2019, a time has come for them to seriously interrogate how they can enhance access to services for persons with disabilities

Basic services and functions were devolved but persons with disabilities have received a raw deal.
The lack of national disability framework where the national government offers regulation to the counties and policy guidance has rendered persons with disabilities inactive and denial of services at the county levels.
This has greatly led persons with disabilities to be left behind thus not meeting the vision 2030 and the famous sustainable development goals. SDGS.

If county governments do not properly entrench disability matters in the ‘Big Four” agenda that is defining Jubilee’s development plan, as it presently looks, desired results
will not be achieved even if the national government yields to the ongoing clamour and cedes more cash to the devolved regions.

County governments are the game-changer in two of the Big Four agenda items, namely expansion of the manufacturing sector, and food security. The central
government must be applauded for the huge infrastructure projects it has initiated to connect the counties. The question is these infrastructures accessible to persons with disabilities?
With this massive project we need to have third eye lenses and ask ourselves are persons with disabilities properly being included?
For instance, in employment what percentage of persons with disabilities were involve?
In the tenders were persons with disabilities engaged?
Its high time the county governments
shed off their wasteful and autonomous and unaccountable attitude and explain their disability mainstreaming agenda.

Devolution gave persons with disabilities hope that it would bring services closer to citizens, increase job opportunities and improve governance. Far from it, if the reports
on the impact of devolution are anything to go by.

Unfortunately, persons with disabilities affairs in the counties have been identified as a main agenda but only to be pushed at the periphery and set in to other broad areas such as social services.
Furthermore, most counties have no dedicated advisors or policies on disability matters.
This is reflected by the low service delivery a lack of mechanisms to support disability mainstreaming.
According to ILO the largest minority in the world are persons with disabilities.
They highly face discrimination, stigma and institutional barriers.
Thus, many persons with disabilities cannot afford basic necessities like food, shelter, clothing, healthcare, and education.
There is also the need to increase the participation of persons with disabilities in governance at the county level. Most of the counties have not adequately engaged persons with disabilities
in designing, planning and implementing programmes. As a result, the knowledge, skills and energy that the persons with disabilities full population harbours goes underutilised.
As a public policy scholar, I opine that its high time. The disability sector in Kenya got a transformation.
This transformation would gain more tract to the citizens with disabilities.
Some of the key areas is moving from charity to human rights in service implementation.
Provide individual choices thus promotion of respect and dignity to persons with disabilities.
The disability sector should immediately stop talking to itself.
Stop board room meetings and step in the the mud.
This will ensure bottom top approach in public participation of persons with disabilities.
This is because the county governments are the service delivery points and more resources are being devolved..
To eliminate the possibility of alienating this potentially most productive group, decision-makers and other stakeholders at the national and county level must take deliberate steps to ensure the persons with disabilities are at the centre of development plans.
This is by having a national disability framework which stipulates the role of the national and county governments in service delivery for persons with disabilities.

Paul Mugambi
Is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.

My third eye on Kenya’s disability movement

It has been argued from different quarters that the attitude of entitlement without responsibility has contributed to apathy among persons with Disabilities.
Kenyan persons with Disabilities should be encouraged to become proactive in ensuring good governance practices and use their creativity to ensure that they find their rightful
space in policy and decision making.
Failure to do this will mean that they have accepted to continually be marginalised.
Accountability is critical in ensuring that political leaders and all duty bearers honour their commitments and shows how different programme actions and
investment of public funds translate into tangible results and long-term outcomes that directly benefit persons with Disabilities . Accountability mechanisms should allow for grievances to be voiced and remedies provided and, as a responsive function, should help to improve how policy
or service delivery can be adjusted to make it more effective.
Efforts should be made to build capacity for persons with Disabilities to claim their rights and engage as active citizens.

An effective accountability mechanism is one that has the ability to transparently show the linkages between national and county levels with strong feedback
information loops.

This accurate and timely information has the potential to help in supporting national and county recommendations, actions and approaches aimed at reaching
the goals that support persons with Disabilities meet their aspirations and live a prosperous life.

Working with persons with Disabilities , especially in complex processes like planning, budgeting and monitoring, is crucial if development policies are to be truly
relevant to those they are meant to serve.
Sometimes participation and collaboration becomes difficult when review processes are complex and hard to interpret.

Persons with Disabilities should demand leaders to provide information in alternative format that is interactive and language that they can understand. All this is enshrined in Kenyan constitution and the UNCRPD.

An environment in which feedback is shared should also be considered.

If possible it should be easy to access without necessarily incurring costs.

Political leaders can only be said to be accountable if they listen and respond to the needs of persons with Disabilities people in a clear manner, explain action taken to
rectify whatever recommendations made and a guarantee that it will not be repeated.

This can be through actions like legislative reforms, innovative planning processes and prioritised funds allocation.

In conclusion, non-discriminative feedback mechanisms and effective follow-up processes is a means of verifying that an effective accountability mechanism
is in place.
The Constitution of Kenya has already defined duties, responsibilities and rights, so what is critical is to create strong linkage and integration both
at national and county levels because decisions are made through a network of actors.
For instance in the recently held general elections the Disability community was duped by the independent electro commissionin many ways.
There were no braille ballots at all. To make matters worse 17 counties left out the nominees with disabilities and for the 30 counties that had still had anomalies. Its still gloomy for women with disabilities as history has shown us they are often left out by women with out disabilities as they champion the women agenda and more sore the 2 third gender rule.
Never the less its important to note at the high level UNCRPD forum in August 2015 Kenya nation proclaimed that they provide free legal service when the rights of persons with disabilities have been ignored plus they provided accessible ballot in 2013.
We are yet to see the steps in which the state law office takes this matter in to consideration.
The litmus test that Kenyan persons with Disabilities should use is whether political leaders have put accountability mechanisms and pathways in place that are inclusive,
accessible, collaborative and responsive clearly showing how they will be structured and work in practice.

NB The views expressed here do not represent any agency or organization they are based on 17 years experience as a disability practitioner and human rights defender.

Few Discrimination experiences at its best In Kenyan context

Every Day:

1) Store employees assuming we’re stupid:Go to the grocery
store, the movie theater, a store in the mall, a restaurant or any
public-type place that has
employees, and five times out of ten you’ll run into an employee who
will automatically assume you’re ill-equipped mentally because of an
obvious visual
disability.

2) buses and matatus passing us by:If you live in a big outscuts like
Umoja, Rwai, Gidhurai, eastlands chances are you’ve experienced buses and matatus
passing you by quite often. People with disabilities
constantly complain that buses pass them by when they’re out on the
road trying to hail a cab.
3) Stairs in public spaces.You go to grab a coffee or meet a friend
for lunch, visit some office but wait – you can’t get in. This is architecture
discrimination at its
finest and we encounter it every day. Despite the misguided notion
that certain buildings are grandfathered-in to the persons with
disability act and do not need to be accessible,
umm no, they do. Any public space must. crossing most roads for us is a night mare.

4) Doctors not really listening.Out of all the people we encounter
each day who may possibly discriminate against us, you’d think medical
personnel would
not be on the list, however doctors and nurses can be some of the most
discriminatory people when it comes to how they treat people with
disabilities.
some one asked my tribe mate when she was pregnant “which animal did
this to you” you can imagine how it sounds when spoken in swahili! 5)
Wheelchair “quotas.”“Sorry, no more wheelchairs allowed.” Concert
venues, airplanes, city buses, amusement park rides – quotas on how
many wheelchairs
are allowed in certain places are a reality of disabled life. They’re
instated for safety, but they’re also highly limiting, generally only
allowing a
half dozen people with disabilities or so into an event or two people
who use wheelchairs on a city bus.

6) Strangers pretending they don’t see us.Once in awhile you’ll run
into someone who’s not very pleasant. Maybe they’re budding in line in
front of you,
or avoiding your gaze when you’re looking for someone to help you grab
something from the shelf. These folks like to pretend they don’t see
us, thinking
it’s easier to do that than just interact with us.

7) People taking our parking spots.It happens all the time –
able-bodied individuals parking in disability parking spaces. The
convenience is just too
hard to deny. And while this is all fine and dandy when it’s in the
middle of the night and there’s no one else at the store, they
generally take our spots
in the daytime, especially the good ones that have extra room for our
ramps. some government offices have turned the unisex accessible
toilets to be stores.

Don’t Believe the Media’s Lies: Disability and Beauty Are Not Mutually Exclusive By medicarepublic.com Additions by Mugambi Paul

This isn’t a feel good story. It’s not an essay on the virtues of strength and bravery, neither is it an attempt to inspire you with tales of overcoming
adversity. It’s not a lesson on looking past disability and discovering some inner beauty bullshit. This is a call to action. This is about acceptance
and inclusion, about seeing and celebrating. Like all diversity, disability can be beautiful.

Diversity is a hot topic. It means recognizing our differences, seeing what distinguishes us from the majority and then throwing a party hat on it and
embracing it. In recent decades, Western society has made great strides in challenging stereotypes and acknowledging diversity in skin color, size, age,
race, sexual orientation and gender. We’re still far from equality on any of these issues but the conversations exist and progress continues. We see these
identities depicted in media and when we don’t, or when we see false, corrupted versions of them, we are justifiably outraged because we understand that
representation matters.

What we observe in television, film and advertising is critical to our understanding of all aspects of society. Media has a direct and profound impact
on how we think about ourselves and others. The inclusion of disability into our socially acceptable model of diversity is an area where we still have
a lot of work to do. Across multiple media, disability is underrepresented, misrepresented, or just plain ignored. In fact, where disability is concerned,
mass media is telling us a big, ugly lie.
#In Kenya we are not yet in existence in the great media and entertainment scenes. Most artists with disability are used us charity objects. Our music royalties are not paid on time and we lack actual marketing and promotion.
I wasn’t born with a disability. But as an adult, I find myself needing to create a new identity that includes it. My search for positive examples to inspire
this acceptance of a new way of being has as much to do with how I feel about myself as it pertains to how others perceive me. In the absence of representation,
the message can only be that disability cannot be beautiful and I refuse to accept that. Fashion and beauty are where we look to see the heightened, idealized
versions of ourselves that help shape our style which is so critical to identity. Yes, fashion is fantasy but in a world where none of us are perfect,
we should all be able to find something recognizable, something that reminds us we belong.

I’m looking for the people who look like me, who look better than me. I need more than just Iris Apfel or vintage Madonna to show me how to style a cane.
I need to see the cool girl with the walker so that I can think, wow. She looks hot. I can look hot too. I’m just as vain and superficial as everyone else.
This frivolous, materialistic, self-obsession is part of my North American birthright and I want in.
In Kenya at most we don’t have artist to look upto just the short stature of Likobe and Mwala we can talk about other disabled artists are either not in existence or never granted the opportunity.
So, just where are these pretty people? In movies and TV, disability is almost always used as a plot point and not as something a real person happens to
live with. In the world of entertainment, disabilities are turned into stereotypes of victims and burdens, heroes or freaks; lazy tropes that are used
to make us feel specific emotions. These careless characterizations are not just hurtful, they’re dangerous. They inform how we see disabled people in
real life and lead us to believe they are low status individuals who cannot be happy, lead productive lives or be self-sufficient. This sucks. It’s also
wrong.

The Victim stereotype is meant to elicit pity with stories about the plight of the disabled that reinforce the idea of how awful their lives must be. Dickens
did it with Tiny Tim in such an overt characterization that even the boy’s name evokes pity. Victims can also be packaged as burdens whose lives aren’t
worth very much. Or at least not as much as that of the burdened person. By contrast Heroes elevate the status of disabled persons, putting them on pedestals
for simply living their lives. Their accomplishments tell us that if disabled persons just try hard enough, they can triumph, overcome their obstacles
and live ‘normal’ lives.
In advert we are not involved even in courses which we can advocate for ourselves the ableism mentality is spearheaded by even those we think are with us in this agenda. Cmpanies in Kenya have now followed soot on this non empowering agenda.
Daytime talk shows and reality TV have become modern day freak shows. Disability is the spectacle and as it turns out, we haven’t evolved since the days
of PT Barnum’s biological oddities. Meanwhile, physical deformities are used to portray super villains driven to crime or revenge through their unfortunate
fates. From Captain Hook to Darth Vader, movies have us socializing children to fear and associate negatively with disability. From a young age we can
be convinced that disability is a punishment for being evil, or that disabled people probably want to kill you.

All of this is, of course, crap. These are not my people. Like most disabled persons, I don’t see myself reflected in any of these stories. While I would
love to blame my chronic bitchiness on Multiple Sclerosis, people tell me I was bitchy well in advance of my diagnosis. And while it’s true that some children
are afraid of me, doctors tell me ‘super villain’ is not actually a symptom of MS.
These stereotypes are not how the majority of the disabled population experience disability or life in general. But these ideas are so pervasive and powerful
that they’ve become normalized. We believe these harmful lies without questioning them.

Part of the problem is that disabled people have little or no influence on how stories are told. It’s a population that is under-employed in every sector
and media is no exception. Stories are most often not written by disabled persons and the number of actors in leading roles with disabilities is not a
number that exists. Even when the story is about being disabled. Imagine if this were still true for other marginalized groups. Our false convictions are
so strong and so deep that most of us don’t even see a problem with this.

In addition to what we think disability is, we are left with what we think disability is not. The media wants us to believe that persons with disabilities
cannot be considered attractive, desirable or sexual.

In the fashion and beauty realm, there is no narrative. Disability is altogether ignored, as if it doesn’t exist; as if we don’t also have budgets for
things like lipstick and lingerie. We are lead to believe that disabled people are not also girlfriends, boyfriends, lovers, parents and partners, workers,
travelers and friends. We don’t recognize disabled persons as contributing, participating members of society.

It’s thus become accepted that disability disqualifies you from being beautiful. When someone does describe a woman with a disability as attractive, it
can feel like a loaded statement. Maybe it’s being said with shock and surprise. Or perhaps it’s qualified with something like “You’re pretty, for a disabled
chick” or “What a waste of such a pretty girl to be in a wheelchair”. The people saying these things actually think they’re doling out compliments. When
I was in the process of being diagnosed, someone who thought she was being supportive said to me, “Don’t worry. Pretty people don’t get MS.”

WTF? Wherever did we get that idea?

Society would have us believe this demographic doesn’t matter anyway because it doesn’t affect that many people. But according to the 2009 US census, 9.9%
of working aged Americans had a disability. That means 1 in every 10 Americans aged 18-64 reported significant difficulty with hearing, vision, cognition,
ambulation, self-care or independent living. Yet we don’t tend to think of this population as visible minorities worthy of accurate and careful representation.

If we don’t truly see the diversity, we don’t see the injustice. In race or gender this translates to things like discrimination and income inequality.
In disability this can mean lack of accessibility, or issues of employability. Transgender bathroom rights are in the news every day recently but despite
the ADA (American’s with Disabilities Act) having been around since 1990, PWD act of Kenya 2003 of NO. 14 there are many public spaces in both North America and more worse in Kenya that don’t have accessible bathrooms
at all. While we are arguing and passing laws about who gets to pee where, there is a whole segment of the population that has nowhere to pee. Why aren’t
we outraged about that?
In Kenya we get free county toilets which at most a time are not even accessible.
It’s time to get real about the stories we tell about disability. Why is it that we’re more comfortable seeing the undead eat brains than we are hearing
about an actual human with a colostomy bag? Disability is a normal part of the natural diversity of the world. It’s not going anywhere and we need to make
room for it. Increasingly positive media examples have lead to the rising status of several diverse groups over recent years. The acceptance of disability
should be no different. Media not only influences societal trends, it practically dictates them. The arts are by nature forward thinking and innovative
and have a real opportunity to change ideas in a massive and meaningful way. People with disabilities live full lives and are many things, including beautiful.
It’s time to tell these stories.

Quadriplegic explore article by Wacianya with Additions from Mugambi Paul #CDS

HARSH INSPIRATION

Of course everybody is not going to love you,
With or without your disability,
Not everybody is going to like you,
Appreciate you,
Understand you,
Accommodate you,
Encourage you,
others may hold your assistive device,
others will talk much about you,
It’s your journey, come on!
Others may accompany you,
stare at glance,
Or choose not to,
Does it mean you terminate your journey?
You see even if you choose to terminate it,
Others will continue with theirs,
The hands of time will not stop,
Neither will they slow down,
It’s a jungle out there for everyone,
So don’t just sit in your pity potty,
Angry at life and fate,
Angry at everyone and everything,
Angry at your family, friends, strangers,
Goats, dogs, wind, rain, leadership, poor infrastructure sunshine….
Angry at you, come on!
It’s a race against time,
In pursuit of joy,
In pursuit of love and happiness,
In pursuit of fulfillment,
So rise up from your pity potty,
Go out there and live,
That’s the only life you have,
Love it,
Love yourself and love others,
None of us are getting out of here alive,
so please stop treating yourself like an after thought.
Eat the delicious food.
Walk in the sunshine.
Jump in
the ocean.
Say the truth that you’re carrying in your heart like hidden treasure.
Be silly.
Be kind.
Be weird. There’s no time for anything else.

Na uache ujinga,
Kumbaff!
#b the change
arise and shine
be out of the box.

Why Disability Representation In Kenyan Politics Matters More Than Ever

In the upcoming election 2017 in Kenya year,
how do we decide who to vote for? What issues are most important to us? I believe most of us seek a candidate
and a party that represents us. We want to see ourselves reflected not just in the candidates, but the ordinary people who support and represent them at
deligations, rallies, and commentaries. Yet for many people with disabilities, seeing someone on TV or at a political rally who looks like us, whose life
is like ours, is an unusual event. We have rarely been given a voice in national politics. Until now.

When I was a little boy, I had about a Blind man DR chomba who was trying to seek election post and was denied.
in history I have read a biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. I learned he had polio and that he was the first and thus far only
President with a significant physical
Disability in the world.

I also learned he felt he had to hide the extent of his disability, using braces and carefully staged photo opportunities to conceal the fact that he
couldn’t walk. He refused to be photographed in a wheelchair, to the point where very few photos of him using one survive. Although I understand his decision
in the context of the times, it doesn’t exactly make me feel pride as a person with a disability. He was one of the strongest leaders in U.S. history,
yet feared being perceived as weak because of stereotypes about disability.
I also Remember very well at the university those days of ours we celebrated the passage of the persons with disability’s act 2003 not because it was enacted but because retired president Kibaki had to be on a wheelchair for the nation to realize that we exist.
It had taken 10 years to happen even if some top government officials had children with disabilities who they hide.
Some years later, not long after the Kenyan With Disabilities Act became law, I visited ministry of education Jogoo house and found lifts.C. I remember marveling that the bathrooms in
the jogoow house building were wheelchair accessible, since that was unusual at the time. I asked one of our staff about it, and she said it was
because of
a staff with a physical disability
I had never heard of her before, but I felt immediate solidarity and pride. If she
could be a ministry official with a disability, I could accomplish anything I chose.
This was the time when we actively fought for the affirmative action on entyry to the university for the young generation who are wnjoying the fruits of our labor.
Many years after that, I have watched Representative
Mwaura
giving a speech on TV, proudly advancing the Albinism agenda.
the NCPWD Chair David sankok Politically championing issues
he usually strides across the stage on. There words are powerful, and there personality are dynamic. They inspire the public in that moment. They make many believe someone in our government might actually understand our lives and care about us. They all seem like someone who might
one day be President and do so while embracing there disability without shame.
Since then, politics have taken a turn for the nasty. We have a major party’s candidates talking about ableism tendacies “who can not see the development, who can not hear the development, holding forums in inaccessible stadia, mocking of persons with disabilities”
Persons with disabilities were being carried up the stairs.
All this are not acceptable in this era.
Most of the uttered statement in mother tongue do not get in to the media and leave the disability community talking about it.
am yet to see Jubilee party, CORD collition and other smaller parties having a person with disability from the tribe address the deligate conferences qualitatively. but it seemed no one else cared.

It seems we are known on paper.
Mwaura, David, Mutemi speech have been hard within us its high time they became viral and which can lead to interviews, appearances, and most importantly conversations about disability. We need to keep having those
conversations. It’s easy for politicians to throw a big party for themselves and say all the things they believe, but how often do they actually accomplish
what they promise to do? I appreciate the fact that the all mainstream TV now a days have the sign language interprators. If KSL on TV is quality that’s a story for another day.

people with disabilities have more opportunities than they did in the past. we have more opportunities than we had. But we also still have a long way
to go since we should stop enjoying good will and go for the real deals by stopping the politicians from using us as bargaining tools.
Supporting people with disabilities is about more than including us in deligate conferences speeches. It’s about passing important laws like the
Persons with Disability bill 2016 which am not sure if it will see parliament this year, having adoption of the marakesh treaty, having a carers legislation, KSL regulation, Sighted guide regulations, Adaptive technology legislation
Having a inclusive social protection security for all persons with disabilities

It’s about fighting for jobs for people with disabilities;
our unemployment rate
is far worse than other groups we talk about more. It’s about reforming “work incentives” that are supposed to help people with disabilities to work and
still receive essential health benefits like Medicare and in-home care, but actually make being employed overly complicated.
It’s about adding more teeth to the
disability act 2003 WDA
and pursuing change in cities behind the times and still have many businesses with basic access barriers like a single step at an entrance.

It’s about creating more affordable housing and accessible apartments and homes, so people with disabilities can find a place to live and older adults
can remain in their homes as they age.

It’s about investing in technologies of the future, such as self-driving cars, robotic limbs, and fully-featured powered wheelchairs, and ensuring they
are affordable to people with disabilities.
It’s about reforming our justice system, where people with developmental and mental health disabilities are disproportionately harmed, and promoting education,
treatment, and rehabilitation for nonviolent offenders.
It’s about recognizing that the disability rights struggle intersects with the struggles of other groups. Many people with disabilities, includingme ,
also belong to minority racial or ethnic groups..
When
we have conversations and learn to understand each other, we’ll find out how much we have in common and realize we shouldn’t let people try to divide us.
As voters, we have to decide which party and candidate we feel will best accomplish these goals. For me, ,persons with disabilities should not be put in to one basket.————
If the current 12 parliamentarians and the 72 Members of county assemblys have delivered to us or not that’s a story for another day.
With that said, I acknowledge that many important disability rights laws, including the Kenyans With Disabilities Act2003, were bipartisan efforts. I will
always be willing to have a dialogue with any respectful person, regardless of party affiliation. We can only accomplish change for people with disabilities
if we work together.

Follow this voyage
@mpofunamba1
#chief disability soldier
www.mugambipaul.com
#N.b the views here do not represent any organization but are personal.

Nairobi Memoirs Part 8

#a mile in my shoes
25th March 2004
Two of my clan mates “Blind” had gone to shop for shoes at an exhibition in town.
The Indian trader refused to attend to them. He began to punch blows left right and centre that they forgot the entrance. An ensuing running battle began in the exhibition. It was the mercy of other clients who saved my brothers from being sent to the creator.
The trader thought being blind equates one to being a beggar not knowing that we can also be clients. This happened when they were new to Nairobi and being “freshers” they were quite traumatized by the experience.
If the trader and the customers sympathized or empathized that’s a story for another day.
Nairobi memoires
Copyright 2015

Nairobi Memoirs Part 7

As I walked downtown on Latema road where the Transline vehicles are located.
I heard a soft spoken charming voice say “Mlete huyo ni customer wangu!”
My guide and I were on the move. With no hesitation my guide was caught unaware from the shouting and tap on his shoulders.

“Unapeleka wapi customer wangu?” “Wow! Hujui namjua? ata alikuwa kwa gazeti”

Nairobi you are teaching me a lot. You are making me miss the desert! There is no attention there. I responded politely “I am not travelling to Kericho today”
I am wondering….

If she empathized or sympathized with me, that’s a story for another day.
Nairobi memoires
#copyright 2015

Nairobi Memoirs Part 6

As I entered the lift today, a beautiful lady asked me?
“Are you going to the 6th floor?”
I responded “Yes” not knowing she will follow me as Gloria Muliro sings.
After reaching my floor, I decided to visit “The John” and to my surprise she almost entered!”
“Where have I seen you?” She asked.
“Wow, Wow! You are the activist of the year, I saw you in the newspaper last week!”
If she sympathized or empathized with me
That’s a story for another day
#Nairobi Memoires
Copyright 2015

Nairobi Memoirs Part 5

no

As I walked downtown past the ICEA building we were chatting with my friends on how we could contribute towards the reduction of poverty (A story for another day). An elegant and smartly dressed lady was in front of us. Fortunately or unfortunately I happened to step on her! (You know what happens on Fridays’ in Nairobi)

She quickly began to throw tantrums at us!
Once I had not unfolded the “Fimboyangu!,” I decided to tell her am sorry three times. The gentleman in me repeated again and again!.
She adamantly shouted “Why have you stepped on me?”
As the crowd began gathering around us
I told her politely
“Madam you decided not to see like me?”
She was surprised her heart almost jumped out of her chest!
She began to almost hug me and give me a lot of sorries.

If she sympathized or empathized with me it’s a story for another day!
Nairobi memoires
Copyright 2015

Nairobi Memoirs Part 4

A Deaf client had visited me. I know what comes to mind.
How can a blind man and a Deaf person communicate?
since most channels of communication we have been taught have locked us out of communication.
By now my reader of this post you are wondering
“OOOH my Goodness? what happens?”
I live you to ponder on that!
If you sympathize or empathize that’s a story for another day.
#ask me tomorrow
Nairobi memoires
Copyright 2015