Why disabled academicians in Kenya have botched the fellow disabled! Author Mugambi Paul

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Approximately 15% of the world’s population lives with some form of disability, according to a 2011 World Health Organization report.
Its expected by July 2020 the Kenya bureau of statistics will author new numbers.
Going by the world report and UN estimate we are 6 million with disabilities.
Historically, Disabled persons worldwide have become conscious
Of their rights] un 2018].
for instance, for disabled Kenyans in particular, decolonization held additional possibilities and potential. National independence promised
not just majority rule but also an all-inclusive citizenship and the commitment to social justice. Among the blind and visually impaired of Kenya, such collective
aspirations led to the birth of the Kenya Union of the Blind in 1959. In 1964, after years of futile correspondence with government officials, the Union
organized a street march to the prime minister’s office to attract attention to its grievances. The result was a government panel, the Mwendwa Committee
for the Care and Rehabilitation of the Disabled, whose published report became the blueprint for social and rehabilitation programs.
More importantly, in the early 90’s evolution of disability persons organizations led to high demand for government to put in place legislative measures.
Therefore, Kenya was not left behind and thus a formation of a taskforce in 1993by the longest serving attorney general in Kenya Mr Amos Wako.
It seems to be a torturous journey to achieve mere policy or regulations concerning disabled Kenyans.

Moreover, it took 10 years to have the persons with disabilities act of 2003.
This seemed to be an act of charity just because the then president Kibaki had joined the club [Eddy Robert 1874]

Unfortunately, even to date the national disability policy still remains in draft format!
Where did we go wrong?
Academicians with disabilities are strangely not in the scene.
To put it differently not much academic research has been conducted.
the Kenyan disability discourse need to be changed by scholars.
I observe that researchers need to establish what has worked in promoting disability right in Kenya.
What circumstances ensured change of policies or regulations?
What are lessons learnt?
The current dispensation of the disability agenda is either led by disability elitist, technocrats who are either nor committed to the realization of the disability inclusive agenda.
Other stakeholders are disabled persons who have wealth of lived experiences and who most have pursued different careers other than contributing to this discourse.
Should disabled academicians continue being at the periphery?
What’s need to be done:
As scholars with disabilities and who have lived experience of disability we need to where the academic lenses and fertilize the disability agenda in Kenya.
There exists lots of gaps which I believe can be addressed by research and can shape the public policies intended to serve persons with disabilities.
Am not surprised that Kenya has not yet understood which model of service to pursue. Either the current model of charity which has contributed to the disempowerment of disabled persons in Kenya or the social model which empowers and enables the disabled persons to make their choices and live in dignity.
Additionally, the definition of and understanding the path to pursue on it her disability inclusion or special needs is an area yet to be resolved.
As a disabled person who is a Blind and also a scholar, I wouldn’t like the notion of imagining that a certain entity or institution owns any disabled person.
The truth of the matter we us disabled person were born free it’s the society which has chained us. I am a believer in disability inclusion therefore I do not expect disabled to be directed or lamped into a single source of service delivery.
Best practise:
I assert with the new executive order by the interior ministry on issuance of passport, national identity card and birth certificate of ensuring Kenyans get within one day model,
This offers a rare of hope and should spread to all government entities for effective service delivery.
More importantly, disabled Kenyans have been marginalized in many fronts more especially in getting relevant documentation.
Are we expecting change?
The Kenyan society needs to affirm that all services need to be inclusive as much as possible.
In other words, the different stakeholders need to acclimatize with the reality that Kenyans want effective, easy and accessible service delivery.
This will aid towards meeting realization of vision 2030, sustainable development goals and the global commitments 2018.
Through search processes we can have lots of contribution in having a new dispensation of disability in Kenya.
Nevertheless, with achievement of great strides, the best practises which might arose from implementation of the new directive by the ministry of interior can facilitate the improved versions of regulations targeting disabled persons.
On the other hand, As I had said in my previous articles the reappealing the 2003 act will take place in 2021 and it seems my words will pass.
All in all, academicians with disabilities need to rise up and contribute to the direction and shape the opinions of transforming Kenya.
This can be done in different models and mediums.
The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.