What the Blind and vision impaired Kenyans can learn from south Africa. Author Mugambi Paul

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Blind SA (South Africa) is an organization of blinds for the blinds in
South Africa
as most of top functionaries are visually changed persons. Launched as the South African Blind Workers Organization in 1946 to help the blind in finding
careers of their choice, it was renamed as the
Blind SA
in 2004.

According to an estimate of the
World Health Organization
(WHO) about 15 percent of people in
South Africa
are living with disability out of which 60 percent are visually impaired. In absolute terms about 250,000 children in
South Africa
are blind or visually impaired for whom only about two dozen schools are available. The
Blind SA
is dedicated in developing
braille pages
to facilitate visually challenged persons particularly children and youths to learn and live a meaningful and productive life. Besides, it also conducts
sensitization programmes, skill training and placement facilities for the visually challenged persons.

In an interaction with Devdiscoruse, the CEO of
Blind SA,
Mr. Jace Nair tells us about the challenges for the blind people and his organization’s efforts to make their lives easier.

Q.1. What are the main areas of operation of your organization?

Nair: Empowering blind and partially sighted persons to live a meaningful and economic productive lifestyle is the main objective of Blind SA. We are primarily
engaged in advocacy which involves commenting on policy and legislation, access to ICT, access to financial services and banking, access to Education &
ECD, access to employment and
Economic Empowerment
(EE), access to government services such as health, social security, housing and public transport.

To achieve our objectives, we conduct self-representation, production of accessible publications in braille script, daisy and audio, training in braille
and orientation and mobility, entrepreneurial and small business development, placement, skills program and employment in the public and private sector.

Q.2. How, according to you, your organization is contributing to achieving any one or more SDGs?

Nair: The visually challenged people are among the most vulnerable groups in society across classes, genders and communities. We are dedicated for their
overall empowerment. In this way we are contributing to the achievement of several
sustainable development goals
(SDGs). They are No Poverty (SDG1), Zero Hunger (SDG2), Good Health and Well Being (SDG3), Quality Education (SDG 4), Gender Equality (SDG 5), Decent
Work and Economic Growth (SDG8), Reduced Inequalities (SDG 10), Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions (SDG16) and Partnerships for the Goals (SDG17).
This is achieved by the programmatic and advocacy initiatives.

Q.3. So far, what are the main achievements of your organization in line to the
SDGs
set up by the United Nations for the year 2030?

Nair: We have produced over 1.4 million
braille pages,
trained over 400 facilitators in braille, trained over 100 persons in orientation and mobility and trained 14 persons in small business development. Besides,
we also held 4 events for accessible, safe, affordable and integrated public transport for blinds in association with the SA’s national Department of transport,
four municipalities and Gauteng Province to create awareness for blind commuters and the use of the white cane.

Q.4. What are the recent initiatives of your organization has made in line to the SDGs?

Nair: Empowering blind and partially sighted people through programmatic initiatives are our prime focus. In the year 2018-19, we made a presentation and
conducted sensitization programs in 56 companies and four job placements. The beneficiaries of various categories include NSF project (88), Braille Training
(149), ETDP SETA (50), CoJ Projects (30), Study Bursary Project (55), World Read Aloud Day (14) and 645 learners.

Q.5. What is your strategy for further expansion of your organization?

Nair: We aspire to re-affiliate with the
African Union of the Blind,
World Blind Union
and Internal Council of the visually impaired. Besides, we are also working for a greater role in
SA Disability Alliance
and SA Braille Authority.

Q.6. Where do you want to see your organization by 2030?

Nair: By 20130, we aspire to emerge as a leading national disabled people organization in
South Africa
leading the mainstreaming of disability for blind and partially sighted persons.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy, diversity, inclusion and sustainability expert.