Kenya society for the Blind need to be led by Blind and vision impaired persons Author Mugambi Paul

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Kenya society for the Blind need to be led by Blind and vision impaired persons
Author Mugambi Paul

believe this as much today as we did in 1940. Unfortunately, too many Kenyan people
still take literally the parable that says when the blind lead the blind,
both will fall into the ditch. In 1950 our hope said that a literal
interpretation was wrong, and our experience now confirms it day after day,
year after year, decade after decade.
This is when the formation of Kenya Union of the Blind took place.
Unfortunately most never lived to see the fruits of there labour as veterans.
This affirmed by the heroes and heroines in the Blindness sector who have either gone ahead of us.
Some of these have provided great leadership and others have refused to pass on the baton to the generations to come.
I affirm that Kenya union of the Blind is one of the sleeping icons in the country.
As an advocacy organ it has not put any government institution relating to blindness to reform or become accountable to the Blind and vision impaired .
The heroes and heroines in the Blindness sector are turning in to their graves asking what happened?
As I was explaining earlier,
i but parables, stereotypes, and legal beliefs do not easily give way
even in the face of evidence refuting them. Unfortunately, the Blind and visually impaired persons have rendered the public space to be run by others who are not blind or vision impaired.
Kenya society for the Blind is one great example where the blind and vision impaired think they can find solace but it’s all in vain.
Kenya institute for the blind is facing similar predicament.
When was the position advertised?
Was it accessible to the blind and visually impaired persons?
Aren’t there Blind and visually impaired professionals.
Why are we silent on this?
In other words, many professionals who are not blind have mastered to speak on our behalf and have largely misrepresented the Blind and thus the once vibrant blind and vision impaired sector is crying for social justice to prevail.
The blind and vision impaired persons need to scrutinize the positions of the Chief executive officers of these government entities so that they do not become permanent and deny able blind and vision impaired persons from serving their own.

As a public policy scholar, I opine the blind and vision impaired persons need to rise and bring cows back home.
This is to say the blind and vision impaired need to make important decisions on how the blind related organizations ran by government and nonstate actors through having the say.
Secondly as a blind person I know the shoe since am the wearer.
No amount of professional who is neither Blind or vision impaired can understand or have the experience we have.
Thirdly, no wonder Central bank of Kenya and the Kenyan media have collaborated to cheat the public that bank notes are accessible to us the blind and vision impaired persons!
Let the Blind and vision impaired come of age and do the needful.
We are grateful for the support you have offered us,
Let now the Blind and the vision impaired persons be the leaders in the sectors.
Am not surprised that the little kid the Albinism family has been able to build away from home and has fortunately claimed the national cake at its best.
Unfortunately they left the Mother and father “Blind and vision impaired” to suffer.
Furthermore, without blind once built their identity not only on helping the blind but in speaking for us, making
all important decisions for us, and being the interpreters through which
Kenya would hear from its blind unfortunates. Thanks to Kenyan constituent which recognizes the people as the owners and proclamation of public participation and a country that encourages us to reach for our day in the sun as we
pursue the Kenyan dream.
Will the Blind and vision impaired generation not have chief executives who are blind?
Will the future blind and vision impaired generation just see us in the profession of begging and teaching?
I hope the Kenyan blind and vision impaired person now can start to speak for ourselves, direct the
programs that serve us, and tell our communities what we need and which
service providers are delivering it. We still need professionals who learn
to teach the alternative skills we need and to develop ever-more-helpful
equipment, but we do not need these men and women to speak for us but with
us, sharing in the collaboration that creates, maintains, and evaluates
quality services.

The views expressed here are for the author and do not represent any agency or organization.
Mugambi Paul is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.