Why the disability sector in Kenya needs a urgent transformation

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Persons with disabilities in Kenya account for 15 % of the population [WHO 2011].
Yet they are the most marginalized and lack the basic services from the government.
Obviously since the independence persons with disabilities have been treated as second class citizens.
This is because of the existence of economic, social and political disparities.
on the other hand, others argue Both government and the private sector have played a critical role towards development and design of disability policies.
This is evidently seen by the persons with disability act 2003, the special needs policy 2009 draft disability policy, national accessibility action plan 2015.
All these gains are towards improving lives of persons with disabilities. Therefore, we need to have a third eye lenses to ask ourselves.
Are these policies achieving their objectives? Are persons with disabilities able to effectively participate and included in all services?
The jury is out there.
As the 47 governor’s meet in Kirinyaga for their sixth annual conference in March 2019, a time has come for them to seriously interrogate how they can enhance access to services for persons with disabilities

Basic services and functions were devolved but persons with disabilities have received a raw deal.
The lack of national disability framework where the national government offers regulation to the counties and policy guidance has rendered persons with disabilities inactive and denial of services at the county levels.
This has greatly led persons with disabilities to be left behind thus not meeting the vision 2030 and the famous sustainable development goals. SDGS.

If county governments do not properly entrench disability matters in the ‘Big Four” agenda that is defining Jubilee’s development plan, as it presently looks, desired results
will not be achieved even if the national government yields to the ongoing clamour and cedes more cash to the devolved regions.

County governments are the game-changer in two of the Big Four agenda items, namely expansion of the manufacturing sector, and food security. The central
government must be applauded for the huge infrastructure projects it has initiated to connect the counties. The question is these infrastructures accessible to persons with disabilities?
With this massive project we need to have third eye lenses and ask ourselves are persons with disabilities properly being included?
For instance, in employment what percentage of persons with disabilities were involve?
In the tenders were persons with disabilities engaged?
Its high time the county governments
shed off their wasteful and autonomous and unaccountable attitude and explain their disability mainstreaming agenda.

Devolution gave persons with disabilities hope that it would bring services closer to citizens, increase job opportunities and improve governance. Far from it, if the reports
on the impact of devolution are anything to go by.

Unfortunately, persons with disabilities affairs in the counties have been identified as a main agenda but only to be pushed at the periphery and set in to other broad areas such as social services.
Furthermore, most counties have no dedicated advisors or policies on disability matters.
This is reflected by the low service delivery a lack of mechanisms to support disability mainstreaming.
According to ILO the largest minority in the world are persons with disabilities.
They highly face discrimination, stigma and institutional barriers.
Thus, many persons with disabilities cannot afford basic necessities like food, shelter, clothing, healthcare, and education.
There is also the need to increase the participation of persons with disabilities in governance at the county level. Most of the counties have not adequately engaged persons with disabilities
in designing, planning and implementing programmes. As a result, the knowledge, skills and energy that the persons with disabilities full population harbours goes underutilised.
As a public policy scholar, I opine that its high time. The disability sector in Kenya got a transformation.
This transformation would gain more tract to the citizens with disabilities.
Some of the key areas is moving from charity to human rights in service implementation.
Provide individual choices thus promotion of respect and dignity to persons with disabilities.
The disability sector should immediately stop talking to itself.
Stop board room meetings and step in the the mud.
This will ensure bottom top approach in public participation of persons with disabilities.
This is because the county governments are the service delivery points and more resources are being devolved..
To eliminate the possibility of alienating this potentially most productive group, decision-makers and other stakeholders at the national and county level must take deliberate steps to ensure the persons with disabilities are at the centre of development plans.
This is by having a national disability framework which stipulates the role of the national and county governments in service delivery for persons with disabilities.

Paul Mugambi
Is a public policy and diversity and inclusion expert.