The Road Map to Canaan for the disabled Kenyans after the Global summit

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Global Disability Summit’s commitments need to be reflected in governments’ national policies.
The persons with disabilities in Kenya have seen a new dawn.
This is after the Kenyan government endorsed the Charter for Change during the Global Disability Summit, a “first of its kind” event organised by the UK Department
for International Development (DFID), along with the Government of Kenya and the International Disability Alliance. This is now a clarion call to the Kenyan government to ensure
that their strong stance and work on disability in international cooperation is reflected in our own national policies.
The Global Disability Summit, which took place on the 24th July in London, gathered over 700 representatives from Disabled Persons’ Organisations, Civil
Society, Governments, and the Private Sector. It aimed to mobilise new global and national commitments on disability, especially in regard to international
cooperation and development. It was preceded by the Civil Society Forum, which provided an opportunity to highlight current issues relevant to the global
disability movement and work on the realization of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) [1]
I opine that the disabled persons in Kenya have not achieved much from the 2003 ACT, draft national disability policy 2006, national action plan 2015 concluding observations 2015 made at the UNCRPD.
Despite the policies, regulations and constitutional provisions protecting persons with disabilities, marginalization and lack of voice continue to engulf the disabled person in Kenya.

Other policy makers argue that Kenya doesn’t lack good written policies but poor execution. This is also accompanied by due to slow pace of implementation and lack of capacity.
For instance, disabled musicians, sports men and women play to the second fiddle when being supported by the government.
Another example is the inaccessible government offices.
history all over the world has showed that positive change for disabled people comes when a strong and vibrant disabled people’s movement campaigns
effectively for justice. We know from experience that such change does not come from spontaneous innovation by ministers. We need development that does
not leave any disabled people – or anyone else – behind. The global summit commitments were loud and clear that the governments and development partners need to direct their energy of empowerment and strengthening the ability of disabled civil society in Kenya
this is by holding the Kenya government to account against the pledges they have made. After all Government acknowledges disability as a phenomenon that cuts across all spheres of society and which requires support from all actors.
Furthermore, the Kenyan parliamentarians with disabilities do not have any excuse of not pushing the repealing of the 2003 persons with disability act in order to aline it with the UNCRPD, the 2010 constitution, SDG and now the global summit chatter.
It is my humble submission that with the new cabinet secretary and principle secretary the Kenyan disability movement will have a disability bridge initiative in order to realize the set commitments through a tangible action plan.
Moreover, the Cabinet secretary can appoint a 5 persons task force for a period of 4 months to lay the new way of operatializing and prioritizing the disability commitments.
This can be achieved by ensuring budgeting and aligning functions to the relevant ministries and creating enabling environment for the new development partners as well as retaining the traditional partners.
. The task force can be mandated to ensure they deliver by having the public access of information which has been reviewed, assessed and published in accessible formats and on a regular basis.
This will promote transparency and accountability of the commitments made.
In addition, the plan should reflect the will of the disabled persons where they want all government and private institution to embrace disability inclusion.
The cabinet secretary can get a pull of resourceful persons from persons with disabilities.in order to enable the direct consumers who know where the shoe pinches.
“Nothing about us without us”

the CS and the principle sectretary should join the
International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt of the UK who stated:

“It is fantastic to see such ambitious commitments made from countries and organisations from around the world at today’s Global Disability Summit.

“But, if we are going to help people with disabilities to fulfil their true potential, today cannot just be about words – it has to be about action.

“That’s why we need to hold ourselves and our partners to account and make sure these commitments produce genuinely transformative results for people with disabilities world

Paul Mugambi is a senior public policy consultant and a social discourse commentator.